Green River in Dinosaur National Monument, UT

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dbhguru
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Green River in Dinosaur National Monument, UT

Post by dbhguru » Wed Jul 25, 2012 1:48 pm

NTS

Today Monica made it to the location where the Green and Yampa river come together. It is an awesome place, a 2,550-foot deep canyon in Dinosaur National Monument. What a sight! I'll have lots of images and narrative. The image below was taken with my iPad. It is a little over exposed but gives an idea of what's to come: ancient junipers and pinyons, dizzying heights, great views. Incredible place, and it was almost lost to a damned dam project.
dino1.JPG
dino3.JPG
Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Green River in Dinosaur National Monument, UT

Post by Larry Tucei » Wed Jul 25, 2012 4:23 pm

Bob, Hey you know what? You can always start selling postcards if you need a little extra income for Monica's new Piano that she wants. Ha hahaha! Just kidding of course! What a breath taking view. Your western trips are full of fantastic images and I have really enjoyed them along with the descriptions. Thanks so much for sharing them. Your photos are really capturing the wide open western landscapes! Larry

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dbhguru
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Re: Green River in Dinosaur National Monument, UT

Post by dbhguru » Wed Jul 25, 2012 6:05 pm

Larry,

Thanks, my friend. Here are some additional images of the canyons we saw. The maximum depth I could identify for any of the points above either the Green or Yampa Rivers is 2,875 feet. If you follow the ridge line up from the 2,875-foot spot, you can justify 3,200 feet as the maximum canyon depth. It is a game of numbers to a degree. But one can confidently say that many spots are 2,500 feet deep. That is typically the depths quoted.

There aren't many people who make the journey to the point where you see the confluence, although the hiking distance is only a couple of miles round trip. This is one scenic treasure. The maze of canyons that are created by the two rivers, the Green and Yampa, defies description. It is tortured geology.
DM-1.jpg
DM-6.jpg
DM-5.jpg
DM-14.jpg
DM-15.jpg
DM-17.jpg
DM-12.jpg
DM-10.jpg
More pictures and descriptions to follow.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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jamesrobertsmith
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Re: Green River in Dinosaur National Monument, UT

Post by jamesrobertsmith » Wed Jul 25, 2012 9:49 pm

WHOA!!! Geology rules!! The second photo in the first set is inspiring!

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PAwildernessadvocate
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Re: Green River in Dinosaur National Monument, UT

Post by PAwildernessadvocate » Wed Jul 25, 2012 10:22 pm

dbhguru wrote:Incredible place, and it was almost lost to a damned dam project.
Great pictures! Thanks for posting!

Yep, the confluence of the Green and Yampa Rivers was the site of a monumental 'to dam or not to dam' tug-of-war in the early 1950s the likes of which hadn't been seen since the great Hetch Hetchy debate. Opposition to the dam was led by David Brower of the Sierra Club and Tionesta, Pennsylvania-native Howard Zahniser of The Wilderness Society. When they won the battle and prevented the dam from going in to Dinosaur National Monument, Zahniser immediately parlayed the nationwide momentum for conservation that campaign had generated into a new campaign for the Wilderness Act, which he wrote and had introduced into Congress in 1956. That scenic site at Dinosaur NM in some ways could be considered the genesis of the campaign for the Wilderness Act!
"There is no better way to save biodiversity than by preserving habitat, and no better habitat, species for species, than wilderness." --Edward O. Wilson

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