Theodore Roosevelt NP

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dbhguru
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Theodore Roosevelt NP

Post by dbhguru » Tue Jul 26, 2011 7:48 am

NTS,

Here are a few miscellaneous images from Theodore Roosevelt NP. I failed to post on Teddy when we were visiting that amazing place.

1. Wild horse. We saw many.
TR-Horse-1.jpg
2. Bison. We saw many. They once blocked our path for a while. Unnerving.
TR-Bison.jpg
3. Butte.
TR-8.jpg
4. Little Missouri. Undamned.
TR-LMR-1.jpg
TR-LMR-2.jpg
There are ancient cottonwoods in the Park, although I was not aware of their ages until I later talked to Dave Stahle.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Theodore Roosevelt NP

Post by Larry Tucei » Tue Jul 26, 2011 11:54 am

Bob, Wow! Your photographs have been outstanding these last few weeks and I have enjoyed them very much. Its so refreshing to see such wild things in this day and time. Thanks for sharing them with us. Larry

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edfrank
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Re: Theodore Roosevelt NP

Post by edfrank » Tue Jul 26, 2011 11:58 am

Bob,

When I was there a few years ago, I was impressed by the gnarly trees growing on the site. it is very beautiful as well. Under normal circumstances many of the clay/rock outcroppings are pretty colorless, but after a brief shower the color bands really stood out. There are some good sized herd of buffalo at the park. It is a worth a visit and certainly one of the moist under-visited parks in the system. Most people go to the Black Hills, the Badlands, Jewel Cave, and Wind Cave directly south in South Dakota and bypass Teddy Roosevelt NP. The badlands here at TRNP are simply more vegetated than their equivalent n the Badlands. The park service website http://www.nps.gov/thro/index.htm reads:
The topography of the badlands in Theodore Roosevelt National Park provides for a surprising diversity in plant life. From the sunny and drier south faces of buttes to their forested and cooler north slopes, from floodplains to grasslands, and in prairie dog towns, over 400 species of plants have been identified within the park. As many as 500 species of plants may inhabit the park.
Forests are not the dominant habitat type in Theodore Roosevelt National Park, but they form an important component of the park's habitat diversity. There are primarily two types of forests in the park: juniper woodlands and hardwood forests.

Rocky Mountain juniper woodlands are the most common forest type in the park because the junipers benefit from a microclimate created on the north face of the buttes. There, the sun's heat is less intense and water evaporation is lower. Conversely, the south faces of the buttes are hotter and drier, and junipers are less common. Juniper woodlands on the north faces of buttes also slow the effect of erosion, and the north faces of the hills are not as steep as the south faces where junipers are not prevalent. Elk prefer juniper woodlands where they can escape the heat of summer and the cold winds of winter. The berries produced by junipers are a critical food source for birds including Townsend's solitaires, cedar waxwings, bohemian waxwings, and American robins.

The dry climate of the North Dakota badlands limits the amount of hardwood forests. Hardwoods including green ash, American elm, box elder, and cottonwoods cling to the riverbottoms and draws where water is more available. These larger trees allow shrubby vegetation to grow beneath them, and the habitat favors some animals such as white-tailed deer, porcupines, and forest-dwelling birds.
There are two separate units of the park - one farther north than the other. They each have their own unique character. Which did you visit on your trip, or did you hit both of them?

Ed

.
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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dbhguru
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Re: Theodore Roosevelt NP

Post by dbhguru » Wed Jul 27, 2011 9:03 am

Ed,

Only got to the lower section, but spent a fair amount of time there. Two more scenes.
TD-Badlands.jpg
TD-Prairie.jpg
Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Don
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Re: Theodore Roosevelt NP

Post by Don » Thu Jul 28, 2011 4:28 pm

Bob-
You must be using a pretty nice camera! Great grass scenes~
-Don
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
Restoration Forester (Retired)
Science Center
Grand Canyon National Park

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View my Alaska Big Tree List Webpage at:
http://www.akbigtreelist.org

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dbhguru
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Re: Theodore Roosevelt NP

Post by dbhguru » Thu Jul 28, 2011 5:08 pm

Don,

I git lucky. Those scenes are with the old Coolpix 5400.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

earlecj
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Re: Theodore Roosevelt NP

Post by earlecj » Sun Aug 17, 2014 12:45 pm

Visited this area, both north and south units, this July. Besides the cottonwoods, the arborescent flora appears to consist of of green ash, Fraxinus pennsylvanica, and three junipers: Rocky Mountain, Common, and Horizontal. The latter two, of course, are debatably arborescent. In fact... attached photos are taken from the alpine zone in the south unit of the park (high atop Buck Hill, which is a bit under 3,000 feet elevation). One shows the general environment, one shows all three junipers growing within one square meter of soil; the Rocky Mountain is only a sapling but the others are sexually mature. The third shows a mature plant of J. horizontalis bearing cones, with on overall height of about 4 cm. This is the shortest mature individual of any conifer I have ever seen or heard reported, so I suppose you could call it a height record.
J. horizontialis and and Potentilla fruticosa on Buck Hill, in ND's alpine zone
J. horizontialis and and Potentilla fruticosa on Buck Hill, in ND's alpine zone
J. horizontalis on Buck Hill, mature and 3-4 cm tall.
J. horizontalis on Buck Hill, mature and 3-4 cm tall.
140701-71 Jun scopulorum, Jun communis and Jun horizontalis
140701-71 Jun scopulorum, Jun communis and Jun horizontalis

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