Linville Falls, NC

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bbeduhn
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Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2011 4:23 pm

Linville Falls, NC

Post by bbeduhn » Tue Aug 11, 2015 9:31 am

Just after passing Linville Caverns, I noticed a small cove that looked dark and forboding, the perfect place to search for trees.

Tilia heterophylla white basswood 102.7'

Robinia pseudoacacia black locust 119.5' 122.5'

Betula allegheniensis yellow birch 78.4'

Carya ovata shagbark hickory 110.2'

Liriodendron tulipifera tulip 123.2'


Linville Falls

Linville has plenty of old growth but doesn't have the right type of soil for solid hardwood growth. The usual tall species just don't perform well but the understory hardwood species do fairly well. White pines and hemlocks dominate the area. Black birch had me guessing with their bark. A couple of them looked just like river birch. I knew they couldn't be at 3400', but I still had to question it.

Betula lenta black birch 94.3'

Magnolia fraseri Fraser mag 95.3' 91.5'

Oxydendron arboreum sourwood 79.3'

Aesculus flava yellow buckeye 108.2'

Sassafras albidium sassafras 88.2'

Alnus serrulata hazel alder 27.4'

Tsuga caroliniana carolina hemlock 75.7'

Tsuga canadensis eastern hemlock 111.8' 117.2' 118.2'

Pinus strobus white pine 136.4' 137.5' 140.0' 143.0' 143.9' 145.0' 146.4' 149.8'

I thought the pines were a bit taller. There may be a few 150's but I couldn't get them through the trees. Many hemlocks have been treated in the falls area and they look healthy. One large grove just off the trail was not treated and is a graveyard. This used to be free of undergrowth and now it has been overtaken by rhododendron and other shrubs. The hemlocks and pines appear to be very slow growing due to soil conditions but they definitely have age. the Carolina hemlock grows on a rocky precipice. Most of the Carolinas look healthy. Looking out toward the gorge, dead hemlock trunks dot the landscape.

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Linville Falls, NC

Post by Larry Tucei » Tue Aug 11, 2015 2:28 pm

Wow Brian! You have really been doing some Forest hiking! Good Job! I can't wait till Fall to get back in the Forest to Darn hot down here. 90-98 Heat index 105-117 no way jose!! Larry

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dbhguru
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Re: Linville Falls, NC

Post by dbhguru » Tue Aug 11, 2015 3:23 pm

Bryan,

Another fine report. Thanks for that 94-foot black birch. It just went into the Black Birch database. We're up to 475 total trees.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Linville Falls, NC

Post by Matt Markworth » Tue Aug 11, 2015 4:34 pm

Brian,

Good to hear the Carolina hemlocks look healthy. I'm fond of that species after seeing it for the first time a couple years ago.

Matt

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bbeduhn
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Re: Linville Falls, NC

Post by bbeduhn » Tue Mar 31, 2020 12:03 pm

Hemlocks are doing fairly well now at Linville. One spot near the waterfall had a major die off but the others that were treated have come back and many are in full foliage. I finally got a very tall white pine. I must have overlooked it last time.

Tsuga canadensis 124.5' 119.0' 117.9' 116.6'
Pinus strobus 161.5' 149.1' 145.4'

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Rand
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Re: Linville Falls, NC

Post by Rand » Tue Mar 31, 2020 6:43 pm

That's good to here that the treatment is working. Gives some hope for the Hocking Hills (Old Man's Cave) region here in Ohio.

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dbhguru
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Re: Linville Falls, NC

Post by dbhguru » Tue Apr 07, 2020 3:39 pm

Brian,

Years ago, Will Blozan, myself, and a couple of others measured a white pine at the bottom of the gorge to 168 feet in height. It is down now. I also measured a couple of bottom of the gorge white pines to slightly over 150. Both very old. As you observed, thin soils don't allow trees to grow fast.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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