Historial photo by Albert Roth of American chestnut.

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Ranger Dan
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Re: Historial photo by Albert Roth of American chestnut.

Post by Ranger Dan » Tue Aug 12, 2014 3:59 pm

There is also a woody, stout shelf fungus I've noticed on black locust here in central Virginia, whose mycelia Infect mainly the heart of the tree, rotting it. I use locust in my work for structures, and it's been hard lately to find a decent locust log. I don't recall seeing the borer damage here. There's a leaf miner that arrived around 1970 which turns all the locust trees brown in early summer, then they grow some new leaves. In spite of all this it is still a quite prevalent tree, but apparently weakened.

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Don
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Re: Historial photo by Albert Roth of American chestnut.

Post by Don » Thu Aug 14, 2014 1:48 am

Will-
I contacted the American Chestnut Foundation forester, Michael French. While he wasn't familiar with the "log" photo, he did give me a lead on what the ACF purport to be the largest chestnut in North Carolina. Here's the quote:
"The largest American chestnut tree ever recorded in the United States, was in Frances Cove in Haywood County, NC, a whopping 17 foot in diameter (Detwiler, 1915)". I'm currently trying to chase that citation down...
-Don
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
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Will Blozan
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Re: Historial photo by Albert Roth of American chestnut.

Post by Will Blozan » Thu Aug 14, 2014 7:00 am

Don,

I have seen a photo and it is not impressive, really. I'm not sure where they measured it but not at 4.5 feet. It was more of a blob than a shafty beast.

Will

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Lucas
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Re: Historial photo by Albert Roth of American chestnut.

Post by Lucas » Fri Aug 15, 2014 12:41 pm

We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

greenent22
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Re: Historial photo by Albert Roth of American chestnut.

Post by greenent22 » Wed Sep 24, 2014 2:20 am

mdavie wrote:There's also this tree, which I've pointed to before...
http://books.google.com/books?id=mpBOAQ ... 357&edge=0
Gosh, that's impressive. It seems like a Redwood! Many western specimens would be jealous of that DBH!

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Lucas
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Re: Historial photo by Albert Roth of American chestnut.

Post by Lucas » Thu Sep 25, 2014 7:51 pm


Click on image to see its original size

Seen in passing
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

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Lucas
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Re: Historial photo by Albert Roth of American chestnut.

Post by Lucas » Thu Nov 27, 2014 7:06 pm


Click on image to see its original size

Fig. 4. Chestnut Tree, near the Trail to Buck Spring Lodge, Pisgah Forest, North Carolina. This tree measured eighteen feet in circumference. Photograph supplied by the United States Forest Service. .

http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Popular_S ... th_America

Nice one
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

Joe

Re: Historial photo by Albert Roth of American chestnut.

Post by Joe » Fri Nov 28, 2014 8:39 am

I planted a chestnut 3 years ago- I can't wait to see what it looks like 100 years from now (as I look down from some cosmic perspective).
Joe

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RayA
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Re: Historial photo by Albert Roth of American chestnut.

Post by RayA » Fri Nov 28, 2014 5:13 pm

Lucas wrote:http://timberturner.blogspot.ca/2014/08 ... rican.html

http://timberturner.blogspot.ca/2012/08 ... trees.html

Pictures of wood turned chestnut and natural decay results

Lucas,

That's my blog you referenced.... thanks for noticing it! The photos of weathered chestnut on the forest floor were taken in western Mass, where there are still many chestnuts surviving as stump sprouts that eventually succumb to the blight. I've found a fair amount of dead chestnut on the ground here, but it's always pretty small diameter at this point; I recently found a 10" diameter log, and that's the biggest I've seen in many years. Dead, weathered chestnut has a distinctive look, as you can see in the photos... peculiar longitudinal furrows. I don't know why the wood weathers that way, but at least it makes it easy to distinguish it from other dead wood on the ground. And even in its last vestiges, the weathered chestnut has a beauty all its own, and I always enjoy finding it. And yes, it's almost always hollow; usually all that remains is a shell of a log. But there are some that are just sound enough to turn on a lathe into a rustic vase, of which I've made several. The contrast between the outer, weathered gray wood and the glowing inner heartwood is quite appealing.

I recently posted "American Chestnut -- Once in a lifetime", about mature American Chestnuts I was fortunate enough to see this fall in northern New England; it was a thrill I won't forget... never thought I would ever see a mature, live chestnut, especially in New England! Sadly, the three trees do now have the blight, and probably won't be with us long.
Weathered American Chestnut vase
Weathered American Chestnut vase

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Don
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Re: Historial photo by Albert Roth of American chestnut.

Post by Don » Sat Nov 29, 2014 1:19 am

Ray
In my time at the Daniel Boone National Forest, one of my duties was in re-establishing District and Forest boundaries...it was not unusual to encounter vestiges of chestnut rail fencing (then considered a good use of dying chestnut timber). My father-in-law was an enthusiastic woodcarver and enjoyed any chestnut wood that I could legitimately obtain and deliver. Wonderful grain, and easy to carve (a wood carver's dream!).
Don
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
Restoration Forester (Retired)
Science Center
Grand Canyon National Park

BJCP Apprentice Beer Judge

View my Alaska Big Tree List Webpage at:
http://www.akbigtreelist.org

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