Heath tunnels

Moderators: edfrank, dbhguru

Post Reply
User avatar
jamesrobertsmith
Posts: 906
Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 5:32 am

Heath tunnels

Post by jamesrobertsmith » Thu Feb 14, 2013 12:04 pm

Brief bit about hiking through various heath tunnels in the southern Appalachians (mainly in North Carolina).

http://tilthelasthemlockdies.blogspot.c ... nnels.html

http://youtu.be/WkEPblcn8Aw

User avatar
edfrank
Posts: 4217
Joined: Sun Mar 07, 2010 5:46 pm

Re: Heath tunnels

Post by edfrank » Thu Feb 14, 2013 12:57 pm

JRS,

Interesting subject. This is one of those things that people encounter, but don't normally think about. Upon reading your blog, I started thinking about other similar shrub tunnels I have encountered. Perhaps look up some photos. A couple came immediately to mind. There are nice rhododendron tunnel atop the hill on the Seneca Trail at Cook Forest. There is another rhododendron passage along the Allegheny Front Trail in Moshannon State Forest in central PA.

Edward Frank
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

User avatar
jamesrobertsmith
Posts: 906
Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 5:32 am

Re: Heath tunnels

Post by jamesrobertsmith » Thu Feb 14, 2013 4:58 pm

You can't really hike the Appalachians without encountering heath tunnels.

User avatar
dbhguru
Posts: 4550
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 9:34 pm

Re: Heath tunnels

Post by dbhguru » Thu Feb 14, 2013 7:54 pm

obert

Very good treatment of the subject. As a youth growing up in the southern Apps, rhododendron and laurel thickets were places of intense interest and one where my friends and I prided ourselves in wading through. Of course, we limited our incursions.

The sheer amount of rhododendron in many areas of the southern Apps and in particular the Smokies is hard to fathom.

In my early youth I recall people calling laurel by the name ivy and rhododendron was called laurel.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

User avatar
jamesrobertsmith
Posts: 906
Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 5:32 am

Re: Heath tunnels

Post by jamesrobertsmith » Fri Feb 15, 2013 3:38 pm

dbhguru wrote:obert

In my early youth I recall people calling laurel by the name ivy and rhododendron was called laurel.

Bob
Thus place names like "Big Ivy" and "Laurel Gap", "Laurel Knob", etc.

Post Reply

Return to “North Carolina”