Whitewater River NC

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Jess Riddle
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Re: Whitewater River NC

Post by Jess Riddle » Thu Jan 24, 2013 1:34 pm

My favorite book for bark photographs is Trees of the Central Hardwood Forest of North America by Leopold and others. For most species, they include a series of three bark photographs of trees of different ages/sizes, so you can get a good feel for how bark changes as the tree matures.

Jess

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edfrank
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Re: Whitewater River NC

Post by edfrank » Thu Jan 24, 2013 2:14 pm

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Will Blozan
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Re: Whitewater River NC

Post by Will Blozan » Thu Jan 24, 2013 6:15 pm

pdbrandt wrote:Brian,

I admire your ability to ID so many trees during the winter. Just getting into measuring, I am only able to ID a handful of deciduous trees during the winter - tulip poplar, sweet gum, red maple, beech, white oak by its scaly bark up high, etc. Do you have any suggested resources for winter time tree ID?

Thanks for your posts and pictures!
Patrick,

It's simple- spend more time in the woods with seasoned eNTS!

Will

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Whitewater River NC

Post by Matt Markworth » Thu Jan 24, 2013 7:30 pm

Thanks for the tip, I just reserved Trees of the central hardwood forests of North America : an identification and cultivation guide from the library.

-Matt

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pdbrandt
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Re: Whitewater River NC

Post by pdbrandt » Thu Jan 24, 2013 7:44 pm

Thanks for all the great book suggestions! I have four of them on reserve at the UNC library for pick up tomorrow.

Will, I look forward to spending time in the woods with you and other ENTS sometime soon!
Patrick

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bbeduhn
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Re: Whitewater River NC

Post by bbeduhn » Mon Jan 28, 2013 10:34 am

http://www.americanforests.org/magazine ... e-of-bark/

This is from the author of "Bark", Michael Wojtech.

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Whitewater River NC

Post by Matt Markworth » Wed Jan 30, 2013 6:15 pm

Jess Riddle wrote:
My favorite book for bark photographs is Trees of the Central Hardwood Forest of North America by Leopold and others.
I've watched a lot of Don Leopold's videos about tree species. Here is his Dendrology playlist, there are 135 separate videos each focusing on one species . . .

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLBE1197A3397CAE00

- Matt

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bbeduhn
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Re: Whitewater River NC

Post by bbeduhn » Mon Apr 13, 2015 9:50 am

Since I was at Winding Stairs, not too many miles away, at Will's suggestion, I stopped at Coon Branch to remeasure the red oak champion and the white oak SC champion. I'd been on the trail once before and was dazzled by the towering white pines, thus missing the champion oaks. The pines appear to be in 160-170' range when looking straight up at them but they're considerably shorter than that range. I resisted measuring most of them but some I simply had to. The end of the trail hemlock is now a 50' snag. All of the large hemlocks have been dead for years. Midsized hemlocks are hanging on but they are not full and lush, defoliated on the bottom halves.

Pinus strobus 156.0' 151.8'

Pinus echinata 123.4' across river

Tsuga canadensis 119.8' 119.3'

Betula lenta 100.4'

Carya cordiformis 125.8'

Carya alba 135.2'

Quercus rubra 154.7' SC record (challenger needs remeasure) 132.8' 128.9'

Quercus alba 145.2' SC record, possibly 2nd tallest overall
138.1' 129.5' 125.4' 123.8'

The oaks are all pretty close together. I thought I'd found the red oak @ 132.8', as it had breakage in all of it's top limbs with regrowth sprouting from them. This oak looked pretty tall but when I got to the 150 footer there was no doubt this was the champ. The white oak has one big branch that broke off at about 50' but the crown is solid all around. It took some serious searching to find the highest point. Many points are over 140' so even if it loses its top, there is a plethora of contenders waiting and growing. I found the zero point at eye level and scanned. These are the results of that scan: 139.8' 140.9' 143.3' 144.2' 145.1' 145.2'. Unfortunately, I forgot to get an updated cbh but I assume it hasn't put on much girth. It continues to reach for the sky. It may well top the national champ in the Smokies, but it still has a bit to go. (147.1' officially, 148.0' estimate...fog prevented getting the very top twig)
132.8' red oak with former branch breakage
132.8' red oak with former branch breakage
10'11&quot; cbh SC red oak champ
10'11" cbh SC red oak champ
154.7' SC red oak champ
154.7' SC red oak champ
145.2' SC record white oak
145.2' SC record white oak

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