Tanglewood Park, NC revisited

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pdbrandt
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Tanglewood Park, NC revisited

Post by pdbrandt » Wed Feb 29, 2012 9:31 pm

I found myself in Clemmons, NC earlier this week and remembered that Will had suggested Tanglewood Park as a place of interest for tree lovers. Will was nice enough to point me to an area with tall tulip poplars between the cottages and Mallard Lake (see http://www.forsyth.cc/parks/tanglewood/ ... rk_map.pdf). I only had about 45 minutes to explore the park, but I went straight to the shore of Mallard Lake and found the tulip forest Will mentioned. There are at least 10 tulips with CBHs of 8-10 feet. I would say they are all about 120-150 feet tall. The notable trees are all marked with numbered tags.


Click on image to see its original size


Click on image to see its original size

In the same area are plenty of beech trees and a tall tree along the shoreline with darker bark than a tulip. It had mistletoe in its upper-most branches. Here are a few pictures. Can anyone tell me what it is?


Click on image to see its original size


Click on image to see its original size


Click on image to see its original size

On my way out of the park I checked on an amazing 20.5” CBH oak that I couldn’t help but notice on my way in. Here’s the plaque in front of the tree. The pictures will speak for themselves.


Click on image to see its original size


Click on image to see its original size


Click on image to see its original size


Click on image to see its original size

Tanglewood park also has a restored steam engine on display. There are more pictures of the engine and the trees at: https://picasaweb.google.com/1041699910 ... directlink[/url]


Click on image to see its original size

Here are some past posts on tanglewood park:
Will Blozan 2004 http://www.nativetreesociety.org/fieldt ... d_park.htm
Jess Riddle 2007 http://www.nativetreesociety.org/fieldt ... _park2.htm
I hope I didn’t leave any out.
Patrick

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bbeduhn
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Re: Tanglewood Park, NC revisited

Post by bbeduhn » Thu Mar 01, 2012 10:17 am

I should leave this to the experts but I believe that is a black oak. It does have some semblance of the lines created by northern red oak but is more deeply furrowed than red oak typically is at that stage of life. Either way, it's likely one or the other. Check out the leaves lying around or look for an acorn or other seed or fruit, but you can't always find a match.

Tanglewood is on my list to see. The stats there are quite impressive. The white oak appears to be in excellent health.

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Will Blozan
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Re: Tanglewood Park, NC revisited

Post by Will Blozan » Thu Mar 01, 2012 7:13 pm

Patrick,

I know s. red oak is in that area and does occasionally get mistletoe. Scarlet oak seems to get it the most but the bark isn't right.

Tanglewood is awesome but the damn earthworms have destroyed the soil. I think the trees will from now on go downhill... Many of the n. red oaks are dead or dying and there is no soil structure or herb diversity to speak of. Sadly, this will be the ecological fate of most of our eastern woodlands.

Our work in NTS is all the more important as we witness the current state of our woodlands and document them before further decline.

Will

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pdbrandt
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Re: Tanglewood Park, NC revisited

Post by pdbrandt » Thu Mar 01, 2012 9:24 pm

Will,

I just read up on the impact of invasive earthworms on North American forests. I had no idea that this was a problem. I always thought earthworms were good (and maybe the non-invasive ones still are). If others are interested, I found this article quite informative http://www.sciencenewsforkids.org/2011/ ... ig-impact/
Patrick

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bbeduhn
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Re: Tanglewood Park, NC revisited

Post by bbeduhn » Tue Jul 02, 2013 8:01 am

I finally got the chance to stop by Tanglewood. There wasn't enough time to traverse the trails and doing so would have been an exercise in frustration anyway, since the leaves are so thick. I stopped at the Manor House, which had a number of fine specimens and an arboretum as well. The state champ walnut looked a bit weary, wearing three belts to hold the trunk together and a cable or two. A couple of others were ready to mount a challenge to the title.

Blk. Walnut Juglans nigra H CBH Spr Pts #
76.2' 161" 99.2' 262 no# state champ
94.2' 146" 92.4' 263 529
88.2' 156" 102.0' 268 no#
95.1' 113" 111.6' 236 480
-- 138" -- -- 536

South. shagbark hick 98.4' 110" 96' 232 491
125.6' -- -- -- 512

South. Magnolia -- 162" -- -- no# triple trunk

White oak -- 174" 124.6' -- 517

Tuliptree 131.0' -- -- -- 511
132.0' 200.5" -- -- no#

Dawn redwood 97.5' 119.5" -- --

The new state champ, barring other challengers, is just 60 yards from the old champ. All three big ones are
in close proximity. The Manor House was built in 1859, and I suspect these walnuts were planted in that year or shortly thereafter, making them likely 140-154 years old.

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bbeduhn
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Re: Tanglewood Park, NC revisited

Post by bbeduhn » Wed Jul 03, 2013 2:59 pm

Old state champ
Old state champ
New state champ, barring other competition
New state champ, barring other competition

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Will Blozan
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Re: Tanglewood Park, NC revisited

Post by Will Blozan » Thu Jul 04, 2013 9:03 am

Brian,

Nice Jugs man! There is a 264 point walnut on the Swannanoa River near Biltmore that hasn't been remeasured since 2004. Seems like there have got to be larger ones out there.

Will

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bbeduhn
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Re: Tanglewood Park, NC revisited

Post by bbeduhn » Fri Jul 05, 2013 10:27 am

Will,
I imagine there are 300+ pointers out there. They have plenty more 8' and 9' cbh jugs at the manor House. I can't wait to get on the trails there during tree season. Is that Swannanoa River walnut one that we can measure in the summer?
Brian

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