Adirondack Discoveries

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#1)  Adirondack Discoveries

Postby dbhguru » Sun Nov 05, 2017 11:22 am

Hi Ents,

  I'll let the attachment do the talking, but to find a 16-ft circumference, single-trunk white pine any time, any place is a story. However, in 2017? That's a heck of a story! We will be pursuing this discovery with renewed enthusiasm. The super team of:

  Erik Danielsen,
  Elijah Whitcomb
  Jared Lockwood
  Rob Leverett (my son)
  Fred Breglia (hopefully)
  Ray Asselin (in future excursions)
  Little old me

  will work with the Adirondack Wild folks and maybe the Adirondack Council to help bring the Adirondack old growth and big trees back upon the radar scope. They've fallen off, and the focus has been on tourism and development within (and outside) the regulatory and statutory apparatus that protects this unique park.  

  Hopefully, this will be a new mission for NTS that will help us regain some of our lost momentum. Never too late.

Bob
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Adirondack Tree Mission.pdf
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Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder and Executive Director
Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest

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#2)  Re: Adirondack Discoveries

Postby ElijahW » Sun Nov 05, 2017 2:44 pm

Bob,

Excellent report.  Congratulations to Rob for finding the stand and a "well done" to Jared and Erik for documenting and measuring the trees.  This looks to be a true gem, and an outstanding example of old, healthy forest in the Adirondacks.  I wonder just how old the Black cherries are; they're generally a pioneer species, but my guess is some of these have been around for a long time.  

Regarding 12' CBH White Pines, the Pine Orchard in Wells, NY, has two for sure, but perhaps an addition two or three.  The Pharaoh Lake Wilderness may have a couple of dozen, but I haven't found more than two or three in any one stand.  Pines exceeding 10' are common in some areas, and I've generally not documented many unless they also were over 130' tall.  

A 16' White Pine is a truly exceptional find.  I know Rob has been looking at this site for some time, and I think his enthusiasm was very much justified.

Thanks for sharing,

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks
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#3)  Re: Adirondack Discoveries

Postby dbhguru » Sun Nov 05, 2017 6:22 pm

Elijah,

 Thanks for clarifying the distribution of the 12-footers in the Dacks. It now appears that they will rule in that size category, and by a lot - a lot lot.

  As a consummate Adirondack fan, I can't think of any place that I'd rather see win the 12-footer contest.

Bob
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#4)  Re: Adirondack Discoveries

Postby Lucas » Mon Nov 06, 2017 12:11 pm

Well, I am impressed.

It blows away my misplaced impresssion, from the 80's, that the dacks are an acid rain wasteland.
Last edited by Lucas on Tue Nov 07, 2017 12:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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#5)  Re: Adirondack Discoveries

Postby Erik Danielsen » Mon Nov 06, 2017 1:28 pm

Great report. Judging by the number of 140's in some of the slightly younger stands we saw on wednesday, even where the 12-footers were sparser, I think this site will turn up at least a couple more 150' trees and definitely a few more 12-footers, who knows, maybe up to double what we've already recorded. There are multiple good-looking stands further up the Halfway Brook watershed, on both sides, including a fantastic-looking stand on an island in the bog we had just reached the west edge of on wednesday.

Right across route 3 in the Saranac Lakes wild forest, getting up towards Middle Lake, there are additional very promising stands to be seen on the aerials. I tried to reach one of them on tuesday afternoon, but dark came on too quickly- but not before I found myself in a deep, dense boggy conifer ravine with spruce and hemlock dominating the canopy but plenty of Balsam Fir and Northern Whitecedar as well, over a lush tangled ground level that looked straight out of the Olympic Peninsula. The whole area is clearly rich in beautiful habitats to explore.

I may be able to swing through again early next week after visiting a Bur Oak site up near Canton NY, to scout an additional stand or two. A couple spots that looked good from above did turn out to be nothing much, so it'd be good to eliminate some possibilities.

I am mourning the fact that Bing Maps, previously home to the very best aerial imagery for tree-hunting in their "birds-eye" view, only just in the last few days eliminated that feature to concentrate on providing an "enhanced" version for urban areas only. I wish I had taken more screenshots of the imagery for this section of the adirondacks.
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#6)  Re: Adirondack Discoveries

Postby dbhguru » Mon Nov 06, 2017 1:43 pm

Erik,

  You are a one-man army. So, I have high hopes that the Dacks will become the number one refuge for the great whites in the Northeast. If the books have to be rewritten, so be it. Can't think of a spot I'd rather be.

Bob
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#7)  Re: Adirondack Discoveries

Postby Larry Tucei » Tue Nov 07, 2017 10:26 am

Bob-   Wow that is awesome!  Reminds me more of Colorado sized trees than New England!  It's great to still be able to find such places and like you say what else lurks out there. Congratulations to Rob and the rest of the team on all of these great finds. I have only seen White Pines similar to these once at Cathedral Pines Wisconsin back in 2012.   Larry
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#8)  Re: Adirondack Discoveries

Postby Lucas » Tue Nov 07, 2017 12:50 pm

Erik Danielsen wrote:I am mourning the fact that Bing Maps, previously home to the very best aerial imagery for tree-hunting in their "birds-eye" view, only just in the last few days eliminated that feature to concentrate on providing an "enhanced" version for urban areas only. I wish I had taken more screenshots of the imagery for this section of the adirondacks.


How so? Examples?
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#9)  Re: Adirondack Discoveries

Postby Lucas » Tue Nov 07, 2017 12:59 pm

I meant to ask, is there a lot of red spruce in those pix?

Also, I was surprised Black cherry is so large there. Since conditions are similar here, maybe, I misjudged its potential of it being more than a minor species locally.
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#10)  Re: Adirondack Discoveries

Postby Erik Danielsen » Tue Nov 07, 2017 3:57 pm

Lucas wrote:
Erik Danielsen wrote:I am mourning the fact that Bing Maps, previously home to the very best aerial imagery for tree-hunting in their "birds-eye" view, only just in the last few days eliminated that feature to concentrate on providing an "enhanced" version for urban areas only. I wish I had taken more screenshots of the imagery for this section of the adirondacks.


How so? Examples?


Well, Lucas, that's the problem- the imagery set that used to be available in the "birds-eye" view simply isn't available anymore, as that view has been eliminated and reconfigured as a feature for urban areas only. Here's a link to one of the few screenshots I did save from that: https://www.flickr.com/photos/135293803 ... 6/sizes/o/

As you can see, the resolution on individual trees is much greater than usually available from google maps/earth.

There was quite a bit of red spruce, though I don't believe we saw any that exceeded 100' by much. Most seemed to be between 80-90' tall and 2'dbh or less. Height dynamics for the Hemlocks were similar but with slightly larger diameters on average.

Black Cherry is always an interesting question- why does it grow so impressive in such specific places, while being more of a "weed tree" in seemingly similar conditions elsewhere? My own tendency is to associate big black cherry with a particular confluence of precipitation, elevation, and a soil ecology heavily influenced by the presence of Hemlock. The Allegheny Plateau and its foothills leading down to Lake Erie seem to do the trick quite nicely, and apparently so do the slopes of the northeastern edge of the High Peaks leading down to Saranac and associated lakes. I don't know if this casual correlation holds up in any respect if applied to the big cherry sites in Ohio or some of the specimens the southern appalachians can put up.
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