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Long Point State Park

Posted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 4:43 pm
by Erik Danielsen
Long Point State Park in Chautauqua County is a big-tree site known to NTS, thanks to previous visits by Dale, Bob, and others. I've visited previously with Chris Merchant, to see the big cottonwoods and an interesting patch of old woods disjunct from the main old growth in the northeast corner. I made a trip to Long Point again on Sunday August 13 to measure a few specific trees and then did a bit more scouting in the deep canopy. It's not feasible to do much serious measuring in here until the leaves are off, but this session did turn up some exciting numbers. Here's the full sheet:
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The 129.2' black cherry is near or at the geotag Dale provided for the 130.1' tree in 2006, and its increased girth seems appropriate for 11 years growth, so it may be the same tree- however there are at least a half dozen of similar stature all around it, so it may be one of those instead. This was not measured at this time as the stand's tallest- just the only one I could get a view to the top of. It seems probable that Long Point still has 130+ cherries to show us.
The 129.2' tall black cherry, not exactly a monstrous tree but it sure does stretch up there!
The 129.2' tall black cherry, not exactly a monstrous tree but it sure does stretch up there!
The 17.1'cbh 109.5' tall Northern Red Oak is undoubtedly the same tree that was measured to 16.8'cbh and 111.3' tall in 2006. It may measure taller after leaf-off. It is honestly the most impressive red oak, subjectively, I have ever met. From a distance I was sure it was a tulip. Speaking of tulips, I didn't get satisfying windows on any but one or two should get over 130'.
The 17/1'cbh forest-grown Red Oak, an incredibly impressive tree! I'm at the base for scale if you look closely.
The 17/1'cbh forest-grown Red Oak, an incredibly impressive tree! I'm at the base for scale if you look closely.
None of the ash are in great shape, but they're still there. The tallest bitternut is in a different location than the one Dale measured to around the same height in 2006, but I think I also encountered that specimen and failed to measure it. Cukes may top 120'- there are a lot of them in very good shape. One of the biggest discrepancies from the 2006 measurements are sugar and red maples and red oak all getting to much taller heights, with a couple red oaks likely to break 120' with the leaves off.
The strange, swollen Cucumber Magnolia.
The strange, swollen Cucumber Magnolia.
I made sure to measure the bizarre hershey's kiss-looking cucumber magnolia out on the point. There was a large burl protruding right at 4.5' above midslope, so I wrapped at 4.5' from the slope's low point and again from the slope's high point and averaged the two to get the final girth of 13.25'. It's not the most attractive cuke at this site by far, but it sure is unique.
The large radiant White Oak along the road.
The large radiant White Oak along the road.
The very large spreading white oak is one of several such open-grown specimens scattered throughout the park, and was measured as a tree of interest for the Deep Roots project in particular. Its maximum spread of 120' is impressive, but its odd location on a slope just above the main road makes it surprisingly inconspicuous for such a large tree. The radiant red oak was a nice new find for me. Nearby is an interpretive sign that specifically mentions Black Oak as a typical species in the modern forest at Long Point, which is bizarre- there are no black oak that I've seen there at all.
Unexpected radiant Northern Red Oak. 16.4'cbh.
Unexpected radiant Northern Red Oak. 16.4'cbh.
I hope in the fall or winter I'll be able to take a day or two to do some serious work on this site with Elijah, Dale, Chris, and/or anyone else who might want to join in. I think it definitely has yet to be fully accounted for.

Re: Long Point State Park

Posted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 9:03 pm
by Matt Markworth
Erik,

Wow, that forest-grown red oak! What charisma!

It's cool that it has several substantial black cherries. I usually see the really nice ones as just one nice black cherry in a mixed forest.

Matt

Re: Long Point State Park

Posted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 6:42 am
by djluthringer
Erik,

Great job. Long Point is a really nice site, that I've only lightly sampled. The main grove you were in with the black cherries, then the associated flat near the lake to the east with the fat cottonwoods is where I've spent the bulk of my time. The fat cottonwoods is what drew me back several times. I was first turned on to the whole area by Bruce Kershner and Gerry Horowitz. What a crew we were...

Adding your new finds/re-measures, the Historical Rucker Index for Long Point State Park stands at 121.39:

Species CBH Height Measurer

white ash 4.9 130.8 Dale
black cherry 9.4 130.1 Dale
tuliptree 9.7 126.5 Dale
bitternut hickory 7.3 126.1 Dale
cottonwood 17.9 125.4 Dale
N. red oak 11.6 119 Erik
cucumbertree 7.1 117.5 Erik
sugar maple 8.9 115.5 Erik
red maple 7.2 114 Erik
silver maple 7 109 Erik

And yes, I've yet to see one black oak in the park...

Dale

Re: Long Point State Park

Posted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 9:44 am
by Bart Bouricius
Very cool post, especially the Cherry, Red Oak and Magnolias.

Re: Long Point State Park

Posted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 5:20 pm
by RayA
Erik,

Spectacular red oak! Wow!

Re: Long Point State Park

Posted: Fri Aug 25, 2017 10:03 am
by Erik Danielsen
Dale, the 115.5' tree is Sugar Maple, not Silver, so I think the historic rucker would come to 121.75 as follows:

Species CBH Height Measurer

white ash 4.9 130.8 Dale
black cherry 9.4 130.1 Dale
tuliptree 9.7 126.5 Dale
bitternut hickory 7.3 126.1 Dale
cottonwood 17.9 125.4 Dale
N. red oak 11.6 119 Erik
cucumbertree 7.1 117.5 Erik
silver maple 8.9 115.5 Erik
red maple 7.2 114 Erik
silver maple 8.4 112.6 Dale

The classic range map for Black Oak shows most of Chautauqua County as a gap in its range, and the same goes for almost every other oak except red and white- it's an interesting distribution pattern. White is sporadically distributed throughout mostly the uplands of the county, with only red oak being ubiquitous.

Matt, black cherry on the allegheny plateau really shows its stuff! Almost all old forests here have numerous columnar black cherries, with Lilydale perhaps having the most impressive collection (even if not quite the absolute tallest or widest in the area).

Re: Long Point State Park

Posted: Sun Aug 27, 2017 5:36 pm
by djluthringer
Woops,

Got it. Corrected the previous entry. Sorry about the typo.

Dale

Re: Long Point State Park

Posted: Tue Aug 29, 2017 10:19 am
by PAwildernessadvocate
Long Point State Park is beautiful.

We launched a "Viking longship" (made out of fiberglass) there last summer!
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