NY Rucker Height Index

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#1)  NY Rucker Height Index

Postby ElijahW » Sat Jan 16, 2016 11:05 pm

Bob, NTS,

Here are three lists, the first a historical NY Rucker Height Index, the second NY's current Rucker Index, the third a representation of what the same list would look like if the tallest tree of each species were to give up the ghost or otherwise be disqualified.
               
                       
NY Historical Rucker Height Index.PNG
                                       
               

Historical Rucker 10:  144.5  
               
                       
NY Current Rucker Height Index.PNG
                                       
               

Current Rucker 10:  144.2
               
                       
Alternate NY Rucker Height Index.PNG
                                       
               

Alternate Rucker 10:  140.5
Note on the last image:  the 139' white ash is in Cattaraugus County, not Greene County.  
Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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#2)  Re: NY Rucker Height Index

Postby ElijahW » Sat Jul 30, 2016 11:36 pm

NTS,

Attached is the update NY Maximum Height List.  Please feel free to correct if needed.
               
                       
NY Rucker 10.PNG
                                       
               

               
                       
NY Max Height List Master.xlsx
                                               
(28.53 KiB) Downloaded 17 times
               
               

As a bonus, here's a list of known NY 150' trees (30 right now):
               
                       
NY 150 Club.PNG
                                       
               

               
                       
NY 150 Club.xlsx
                                               
(16.72 KiB) Downloaded 28 times
               
               

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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#3)  Re: NY Rucker Height Index

Postby dbhguru » Sun Jul 31, 2016 11:33 am

Elijah,

  Thanks from all of us for the work you've put in to build the 150s list for NY. I have no doubt there are many more in the Empire State, and probably they are scattered very widely. However, I do believe that there are quite a few more in the Adirondack region, though widely scattered.

   I often think about why we're building these big/tall tree lists. Does it really matter? To many people, the answer, of course, is no. Big and/or tall trees are not their passion, as opposed to ourselves. But beyond it being a strong interest of ours for the sheer sport of it, are there other reasons to pursue the lists?

   Speaking for myself, I see them as a way of reminding the public of what is truly exceptional for each tree species and what could be lost without reminders and action. Even so, it is an uphill battle. I have been beating the drums for places like Mohawk Trail, Monroe, and Kenneth M/ Dubuque State Forests, William Cullen Bryant Homestead, and Ice Glen literally for years. Others of you beat the drums for places in other states. The job is far from over though - for all of us. Apart from the general public, that part of the community interested in places, such as listed above, that deals professionally with forests from whatever perspective remains small, and often miniscule. So, we must continue beating the drums.

Bob
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#4)  Re: NY Rucker Height Index

Postby ElijahW » Sun Jul 31, 2016 7:27 pm

Thanks, Bob.  I spend time in the woods and measure trees because I enjoy doing so; I make lists because that's the way my mind works through problems.  I think what I'm doing is a good thing, not just for me, but for others, as well, though I probably should cut back a little, time-wise.  I'm a poor evangelist in spreading the tree measuring gospel, but I do spread it, nonetheless.

Many thanks to you for your tireless efforts,

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks
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#5)  Re: NY Rucker Height Index

Postby ElijahW » Fri Aug 05, 2016 9:34 pm

NTS,

Erik brought to my attention an error in my 150' list.  The Tulips listed as growing in Richmond County are actually in Nassau County, or Long Island.  Oops.  Thanks, Erik.

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks
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#6)  Re: NY Rucker Height Index

Postby dbhguru » Sat Aug 06, 2016 8:54 am

Elijah, Erik,

  I like to think that building and maintaining these lists represents our collective contribution to the scientific documentation of what particular species can achieve in terms of growth and providing an accurate historical record of growth achievement. People who are not numbers sensitive may think we are wasting our time, but the information we are compiling exists no place else.

  A select group has been searching for outstanding white pines in the Granite State. I really want to get a competition going between Mass and NH. We already have a competition between Massachusetts and Pennsylvania. It would be great to extend the competition to include NY, and thanks to the two of you, I see that taking shape, nY has simply got to have more 150 white pines than Massachusetts.

 BTW, on Thursday, I drove up to MTSF and hobbled around with a walker in the Trees of Peace. My objective was to re-measure the Joe Norton white pine. It has been the biggest challenge of all the tall Mohawk pines. I don't know if I have found the highest sprig from my only decent vantage point, but I succeeded in getting 168.0 feet for Joe. Below is an image of Joe - the trunk in the center.

               
                       
JoeNorton.jpg
                                       
               


 Presently, MTSF has the 4 tallest accurately measured trees in New England;

  Jake Swamp   ------   174.1 ft
  Saheda           ------   170.0 ft
  Joe Norton      ------   168.0 ft
  Tecumseh       ------    167.0 (?) ft

 A stand in Claremont NH on private land could well have 2 or 3 pines in the above 166-foot class. I hope to eventually get back up there and update our numbers.

 But enough about New England. My son Rob believes he may have found some white pines near Paul Smith in the Dacks that could have one or two 150s. That region seems to be able to grow them. However, there is also a lot of cutting across the region. Elijah, if you are planning a trip up to that region in the near future, maybe I can hook you up with Rob.

  As a reminder, on Sept 6th (or possible Sept 1st - not sure which until next week), we will hold our 5th American Forests sponsored tree-measuring workshop at Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH. Then on Oct 15th, we'll have a workshop at Landis Arboretum in NY. These events are definitely starting to make a difference. They are attended by forestry and arborists professionals with a specific interest in big trees, established big tree hunters, state personnel who certify champions, environmental educators, a few academics, and others of varying background. The group that especially excites me these days are the forestry professionals with years of experience in the woods who are applying that experience to searching for, measuring, and documenting outstanding trees using our methods. New Hampshire is turning into a real success story.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
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Co-founder and President
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#7)  Re: NY Rucker Height Index

Postby ElijahW » Sun Jan 01, 2017 10:11 pm

NTS,

I've attached the updated NY Maximum height listing below.  In the interest of keeping the database as current as possible, only measurements made in the last 10 years have been included.  As far as know, the only significant tree removed from last year's list was Dale Luthringer's Black cherry from Long Point State Park, measured in 2006.  Hopefully that omission will be remedied this year.  Please let me know if you find any mistakes.  I plan to keep this spreadsheet up to date, but upload it once or twice per year.  Thanks,

Elijah
               
                       
NY Max Height List Master.xlsx
                                               
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"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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#8)  Re: NY Rucker Height Index

Postby dbhguru » Mon Jan 02, 2017 10:20 am

Elijah,

  Excellent list. Great job! However, I don't envy you and Erik the region you have to cover. I wish I could be more productive in helping you all out. Does Erin have a copy of this list?

Bob
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#9)  Re: NY Rucker Height Index

Postby ElijahW » Mon Jan 02, 2017 4:16 pm

Thanks, Bob.  Erin does not have this list; I haven't had any contact with her beyond the workshop, and ought to correct that.  I really hadn't thought about it.

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks
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#10)  Re: NY Rucker Height Index

Postby Erik Danielsen » Tue Jan 03, 2017 5:50 pm

Thanks for the update! As it stands I'm curious as to how many species NY can claim an overall maximum for. At present I know our Black Birch and Tamarack maximums do so, possibly gray birch, and what about that Jack Pine in Fine? And of course Zoar manages to put up sycamores that suggest they may have potential to match the previous maximums.
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