Highland Park, Rochester, NY May 3, 2015

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ElijahW
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Re: Highland Park, Rochester, NY May 3, 2015

Post by ElijahW » Mon Aug 26, 2019 6:08 pm

NTS,

Since my last post in this thread, I've measured many more trees in Highland Park. I'd like to share some with you.

Additional Highland Park Trees:

Engelmann Spruce Picea engelmannii

53.8' x 3.75'

Hinoki Cypress Chamaecyparis obtusa

84.6' x 4.75'

Alaska Cedar Cupressus nootkatensis

45.3' x 2.85'

Incense Cedar Calocedrus decurrens

42.1' x 3.91'

Carolina Hemlock Tsuga caroliniana

84.4'

English Yew Taxus baccata

54.2'

Japanese Yew Taxus cuspidata

38.8' x 2.95'

Austrian Pine Pinus nigra

50.9' x 10.02'

Black Oak Quercus velutina

102.6' x 15.66'

Northern Red Oak Quercus rubra

97.4' x 13.93'

Shingle Oak Quercus imbricaria

84.5' x 12.90'

Bur Oak Quercus macrocarpa

95.1' x 11.05'
92.1' x 8.58'
90.1' x 12.17'

Chestnut Oak Quercus montana

94.1' x 11.18' (dead top)

Swamp White Oak Quercus bicolor

88.8' x 15.35' (at 3.5')

Sawtooth Oak Quercus acutissima

58.0' x 6.23'

Some Oak Hybrids:

Bebb Oak Quercus bebbiana (Q. alba & Q. macrocarpa)

85.3' x 9.55'

Schuett's Oak Quercus schuettei (Q. bicolor & Q. macrocarpa)

82.2' x 10.32'

Jack Oak Quercus jackiana (Q. alba & Q. bicolor)

71.0' x 15.49'

Maples:

Silver Maple Acer saccharinum

105.8' x 16.96'

Black Maple Acer nigrum

91.6' x 8.79'

Nikko Maple Acer nikoense

59.4' x 8.45' (at 2')

Divergent Maple Acer divergens

31.0' x 1.60'

Manchurian Striped Maple Acer tegmentosum

11.8' x 0.63'

Ashes:

White Ash Fraxinus americana

108.2' x 10.55'

Green Ash Fraxinus pennsylvanica

101.5' x 13.31'

Chinese Ash Fraxinus chinensis

50.5' x 9.76'

Everything Else:

Giant Dogwood Cornus controversa

43.2' x 2.17'

Kousa Dogwood Cornus kousa

28.3' x 2.84'

Cucumber Magnolia Magnolia acuminata

90.8' x 7.62'

Kobus Magnolia Magnolia kobus

32.8' x 2.31'

Japanese Walnut Juglans sieboldiana

44.9' x 4.76'

Yellow Buckeye Aesculus flava

75.6' x 8.90'

Japanese Horsechestnut Aesculus turbinata

73.6' x 10.96' (at 3')

Texas Honeylocust Gleditsia x texana (Natural hybrid of G. aquatica & G. triacanthos)

55.4'

White Poplar Populus alba

100.7'

Chinese Catalpa Catalpa ovata

20.1' x 1.35'

Peking Lilac Syringa pekinensis

42.7'

Northern Bayberry Morella pennsylvanica

18.1'

Chinese Chestnut Castanea mollisima

45.8' x 5.86'

Amur Maackia Maackia amurensis

36.3'

European Spindletree Euonymus europaeus

26.7'

Netleaf Hackberry Celtis laevigata var. reticulata

36.7' x 1.93'

Maidenhair Tree Ginkgo biloba

94.3'
81.6' x 12.30'

Japanese Zelkova Zelkova serrata goshiki

29.7' x 2.20 (at 1.5')

Wafer-Ash (Common Hoptree) Ptelea trifoliata

26.8' x 0.95 (largest of multiple stems at 4.5')

Carolina Silverbell Halesia carolina

26.8'

Dove Tree Davidia involucrata

24.8' x 1.50'

Caucasian Wingnut Pterocarya fraxinifolia

63.0' x 9.10' (largest of multiple stems)

London Planetree Platanus x acerifolia

99.3' x 11.20'

Japanese Alder Alnus japonica

49.4' x 5.42'

Oriental Photinia Photonia villosa

25.8'

Red Elderberry Sambucus racemosa

13.7'

That's it for now,

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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dbhguru
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Re: Highland Park, Rochester, NY May 3, 2015

Post by dbhguru » Tue Aug 27, 2019 11:43 am

Elijah,

You are a one-man tree-measuring army. Please share with us some of your greatest surprises.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Erik Danielsen
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Re: Highland Park, Rochester, NY May 3, 2015

Post by Erik Danielsen » Wed Aug 28, 2019 7:51 am

I noticed that big sugar maple girth. What was the form like? I think that's about the biggest I've ever heard of in NY state.

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ElijahW
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Re: Highland Park, Rochester, NY May 3, 2015

Post by ElijahW » Sun Sep 01, 2019 4:11 pm

Erik,

I think you're referring to the Silver Maple, at just under 17' CBH. It is a single-trunk tree, and probably has some age - definitely over 100 years.

Bob,

Thanks. I forgot to mention the AF nation champion Dwarf Chinkapin Oak, nominated by Douglas Basset and Richard Cook.
Dwarf Chinkapin Oak
Dwarf Chinkapin Oak
34' Dwarf Chinkapin Oak.  Slightly taller than 6'
34' Dwarf Chinkapin Oak. Slightly taller than 6'
The Castor Aralia was a big surprise; I had no idea what the tree was when I first saw it, and figured it was just another exotic maple.

The Manchurian Striped Maple was a beautiful little tree: very similar in appearance to our Striped Maple, but smaller with darker streaking on the bark.

The hybrid White oaks were incredible finds. They're a little over 100 years old, and excellent examples of "hybrid vigor."

Many of the mature trees in Highland Park were derived from the Arnold Arboretum collection, and have really come into their own in Western NY. The diversity of species combined with their vitality is something to behold. I'm indebted to the original architecs of Highland, Durand-Eastman, Seneca, and Genessee Valley Parks, as well as the land donors who made the arboretum possible. Their work is my enjoyment.

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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Erik Danielsen
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Re: Highland Park, Rochester, NY May 3, 2015

Post by Erik Danielsen » Mon Sep 02, 2019 7:14 pm

Yes, I misread. Still impressive as a single-trunk!

How obvious is the difference between Dwarf Chinkapin Oak and a stunted Chestnut Oak in person? There were some references to Dwarf Chinkapin Oak on the slopes of stunted chestnut oak in zoar valley from the Diggins/Kershner era, but some of the tree identifications for that area from that time still need to be confirmed.

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Lucas
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Re: Highland Park, Rochester, NY May 3, 2015

Post by Lucas » Tue Sep 03, 2019 10:58 am

ElijahW wrote:
Thanks. I forgot to mention the AF nation champion Dwarf Chinkapin Oak, nominated by Douglas Basset and Richard Cook.
DSC01234.JPG
DSC01232.JPG
This looks suspicious. Any chance it is the wrong id? The fact the sign does not have dwarf on it suggests it is mislabelled, too?
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

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ElijahW
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Re: Highland Park, Rochester, NY May 3, 2015

Post by ElijahW » Tue Sep 03, 2019 6:07 pm

Lucas,

Signs on trees, even in a good arboretum, are not as reliable as we'd like them to be. Though I've been wrong a number of times on tree IDs, I'm pretty confident that this one is correct. The leaf size, shape, and texture, the acorn size and shape, and the bark all match the descriptions given for Q. prinoides in the guides I have access to, both in print and online. What seals the deal for me, however, is the overall appearance and growth form of the tree. I'll post more photos below. Keep in mind that this tree is not young and grows on a site with very favorable conditions. You may notice a trio of Bear Oaks in the background, as well as a second Dwarf Chinkapin Oak.

Erik,

I would describe the Dwarf Chinkapin Oak simply as a Chinkapin Oak in miniature, with a stunted growth habit. The leaves, acorns and bark are all similar to Q. muehlenbergii, but the leaves and acorns are smaller. From what I've read, Q. muehlenbergii and Q. prinoides occupy different niches in natural settings, but the Highland Park tree was obviously planted on a site which it normally would not be found (this may also partly explain its unusual size, as well). My guess is that Dwarf Chestnut Oak would follow the same pattern as Dwarf Chinkapin Oak: similar in key identifiable characteristics to its larger relative, but much smaller and occupying a different niche on the landscape.

It doesn't help that many sources use both Dwarf Chestnut and Dwarf Chinkapin Oak as the common name for Q. prinoides. It seems that the confusion stems from the fact that the former scientific name for Chestnut Oak is Q. prinus. Q. prinoides would logically follow as the scientific name for a smaller version of that species. I've attached some photos below that will hopefully help my roundabout explanation. You'll notice the nearly-bristle-tipped lobes characteristic of Chinkapin Oak, as opposed to the rounded lobes found on Chestnut Oaks.
DSC01223.JPG
DSC01225.JPG
DSC01226.JPG
DSC01228.JPG
Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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Lucas
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Re: Highland Park, Rochester, NY May 3, 2015

Post by Lucas » Tue Sep 03, 2019 7:49 pm

ElijahW wrote:My guess is that Dwarf Chestnut Oak would follow the same pattern as Dwarf Chinkapin Oak: similar in key identifiable characteristics to its larger relative, but much smaller and occupying a different niche on the landscape.

It doesn't help that many sources use both Dwarf Chestnut and Dwarf Chinkapin Oak as the common name for Q. prinoides.
I assume you mean suppressed Chestnut Oak for Dwarf Chestnut Oak in the first line as like you say the names run together in the 2nd line. This would be confusing to someone not up on oaks, like me, otherwise.
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

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Erik Danielsen
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Re: Highland Park, Rochester, NY May 3, 2015

Post by Erik Danielsen » Tue Sep 03, 2019 10:01 pm

Elijah,

Thanks for the additional notes and images. I've encountered Q. prinoides in its more typical natural habitat on the atlantic coast where it's more of a ground-level scrub species, and in that setting the pseudo-bristle lobes aren't always well developed, so the leaf shape resemblance can go towards Q. montana as well as muehlenbergii. As you show, specimens attaining tree form seem to have much more distinguished traits.

I am going to go with the assumption that in the literature from Zoar, references to dwarfed Q. montana specimens as "Dwarf Chestnut Oak" were misinterpreted as referring to Q. prinoides.

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ElijahW
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Re: Highland Park, Rochester, NY May 3, 2015

Post by ElijahW » Wed Sep 04, 2019 11:37 am

Lucas,

Correct. I’m sorry for not being clearer.

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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