The prevalence of trees by circumference size

Moderators: edfrank, dbhguru

#1)  The prevalence of trees by circumference size

Postby John Harvey » Wed Jan 07, 2015 12:39 pm

This is sort of an odd post but I thought it was an interesting bit of information. I usually will only stop to measure a tree for circumference if I think it is over 15ft CBH. (Unless of course its a species that rarely reaches a circumference of a smaller measurement such as a 10ft CBH Atlantic White Cedar.) If I'm not sure if the tree is over 15ft CBH I don't stop regardless so I'm sure I miss quite a few trees of that circumference but at the same time have measured a few in the 14ft range.
Now to my point. I've noticed that in the north east rarity increases tremendously at 16'+. Certainly there are entire towns without a tree of this circumference. The next large drop off occurs at 18' and again above 20'. Below is a breakdown for New Jersey although PA, DE, and Maryland seem to have similar trends.


Big Trees Measured in NJ
14'     50+ trees (Not measured normally but have observed 100s)
15'     55 trees (Many, many, more passed by and not measured 20+)
16'     37 trees  
17'     31 trees
18'     16 trees
19'     22 trees
20'     13 trees
21'     7 trees
22'     11 trees
23'      3 trees
24'      4 trees
25'      5 trees
26'      2 trees
27'      2 trees
John D Harvey (JohnnyDJersey)

East Coast and West Coast Big Tree Hunter

"If you look closely at a tree you'll notice it's knots and dead branches, just like our bodies. What we learn is that beauty and imperfection go together wonderfully." - Matt Fox

For this message the author John Harvey has received Likes - 5:
Barry Caselli, bbeduhn, Larry Tucei, Matt Markworth, tclikesbigtrees
User avatar
John Harvey
 
Posts: 723
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2012 9:25 pm
Location: Northern California but from South Jersey
Has Liked: 352 times
Has Been Liked: 433 times
Print view this post

#2)  Re: The prevalence of trees by circumference size

Postby dbhguru » Wed Jan 07, 2015 5:32 pm

John,

  Good numbers. Interesting distribution. By the time you reach central New England (in a north-south direction), the number of 18+ foot circumference trees drop dramatically. For a comparable sized area centered in Massachusetts here, I'd guess that the number is down to between 50% and 60% of what you've got in New Jersey, although I'd be hard pressed to justify 50%. Farther north, tree size drops significantly. Most of the reported 20-footers are multi-stemmed. The cottonwood might be the species that most often reaches the big circumference numbers above 42 degree latitude.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder and Executive Director
Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
User avatar
dbhguru
 
Posts: 4056
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 10:34 pm
Location: Florence, Massachusetts
Has Liked: 4 times
Has Been Liked: 1087 times
Print view this post

#3)  Re: The prevalence of trees by circumference size

Postby John Harvey » Wed Jan 07, 2015 6:44 pm

Bob,
I should have included these numbers in my original post. This is another list I keep of species I've measured over 15ft cbh. Except for the Redwood, Doug fir, Spruce and Monterrey Cypress all of the other trees are in the North East and only a couple in northern Virginia. Its been a bit since I've updated this list, trees need to be added, but it still gives an idea of type.

Redwood   70 (Only measured if perceived to be over 40ft CBH)
Sycamore   38
White Oak   29
Tulip Poplar   23
Willow Oak   11
Southern Red Oak 10
Silver maple 9
English Elm 3
Catalpa 1
Scarlet Oak 2
Cherrybark Oak 1
Red Maple 1
Chinkapin Oak 2
Live oak 1
Eastern Cottonwood 4
American Elm 5
Bald Cypress 2
Black Oak  7
Post Oak 1
Dawn Redwood 1
American Basswood 1
Swamp Chestnut Oak 2
Unknown 1
Zelkovia 1
Beech   3
Chestnut Oak 2
Weeping Willow 1
Unknown Ash 2
Honey Locust 1
Red Oak 1
Monterrey Cypress 2
Cucumber Magnolia 1
Douglass Fir 2
Sitka Spruce 2
Bur Oak 2
Black Walnut 2
Ginkgo 2
John D Harvey (JohnnyDJersey)

East Coast and West Coast Big Tree Hunter

"If you look closely at a tree you'll notice it's knots and dead branches, just like our bodies. What we learn is that beauty and imperfection go together wonderfully." - Matt Fox

For this message the author John Harvey has received Likes :
Barry Caselli
User avatar
John Harvey
 
Posts: 723
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2012 9:25 pm
Location: Northern California but from South Jersey
Has Liked: 352 times
Has Been Liked: 433 times
Print view this post


Return to New Jersey

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron