Two more big Red Spruce (Picea rubens)

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wrecsvp
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Two more big Red Spruce (Picea rubens)

Post by wrecsvp » Mon Nov 09, 2015 10:20 pm

near Ayers Lake. I posted an 109' tall x 82" CBH tree found in the same neck of the woods in 2013:
http://ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=100&t=5914

Here's two similarly-large trees growing near each other found in September 2015. Plenty of other large as-yet unmeasured specimens here:

Tree 1: 107' tall x 79.75" CBH

Tree 2: 100' tall x 86.75" CBH
Attachments
Tree 1: looming large from a nearby clearing
Tree 1: looming large from a nearby clearing
Tree 1: zoom of top
Tree 1: zoom of top
Tree 1: Impressive lichens near the top
Tree 1: Impressive lichens near the top
Tree 1
Tree 1
Tree 2
Tree 2
Tree 2: More massive, but not quite as tall as some other very large Red Spruce found in the area
Tree 2: More massive, but not quite as tall as some other very large Red Spruce found in the area
Top of Tree 2
Top of Tree 2

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mdvaden
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Re: Two more big Red Spruce (Picea rubens)

Post by mdvaden » Mon Nov 09, 2015 11:26 pm

I always enjoy lichens on trees.

Makes them seem older. Especially if they are older.
M. D. Vaden of Oregon = http://www.mdvaden.com

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ElijahW
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Re: Two more big Red Spruce (Picea rubens)

Post by ElijahW » Sat Nov 14, 2015 8:32 am

Wrecsvp,

Any guess as to the age of these trees? They're beautiful, by the way.

In the Adirondacks, a red spruce of similar proportions could be 150 years old or more.

Also, are pines (red, white, or jack) present in the immediate area?

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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wrecsvp
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Re: Two more big Red Spruce (Picea rubens)

Post by wrecsvp » Sat Nov 14, 2015 8:43 pm

Hi Elijah,

Good questions.

To answer question #1, my short answer is that these trees are old. My longer answer: I have some pretty solid #s on age for Red Spruce in this area. I visited a nearby roadcut with stumps in 2013 and counted rings of Red Spruce and other trees. The oldest tree was a Hemlock (274 rings); with many trees from multiple species in the 150-250 range. Based on the data below, I'm thinking they're very likely over 200, and how much over would depend largely on how much suppression they experienced on the way up.

Here's the Red Spruce data I was able to collect:
November 2013 data on stumps at recent (~2011) roadcut
Picea rubens, with countable rings:

Species * Rings * avg. diam. “ * Notes
Picea rubens 237 22 up to 178 rings was suppressed and then grew fast until 203 rings
Picea rubens 219 24
Picea rubens 197 18.0 injured at 80 rings lost 2/3 of bark, suppressed at centre, some rings uncountable (probably 10-20)
Picea rubens 191 19.0 some rot and therefore some rings uncountable, at 185 rings began to grow vigorously but then was cut 6 years later
Picea rubens 180 27.4 partly uncountable, somewhat older than 180
Picea rubens 170 20.1 growing well for last 20 years until it was cut
Picea rubens 169 21 some rings uncountable, tree is somewhat older
Picea rubens 134 partly uncountable, the tree is older than 134
Picea rubens 78 5.5 suppressed throughout life, especially toward its latter years
Picea rubens 73 13 never seriously suppressed

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wrecsvp
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Re: Two more big Red Spruce (Picea rubens)

Post by wrecsvp » Sat Nov 14, 2015 8:50 pm

Hi again Elijah,

to answer question #2:

There is (to me) a surprising lack of Pines at this 2000 acre old forest. I've seen a small number of unimpressive mature White Pine along the lakeshore, and a handful of seedlings near them. I've seen zero natural-growth Red Pine and Jack Pine; and looked hard for any (especially Red).

Cheers,
Owen

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