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Re: Grand Tetons

JRS wrote:

The black bear made me a tad nervous because he was so intent on eating something in the brush (I never determined what it was

Probably a hiker. Don't worry, they will make more.
by edfrank
Sun Jul 03, 2011 10:17 pm
 
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Re: Poland's Mysterious Crooked Forest

While it has been interesting to read of the speculation for the curious bend in these trees, I'd vote for an exceptional snow storm/avalanche/year. I've seen these kinds of bends before in northern forests...the uniformity (similar response to an event coming from the left (relative to the view we're looking at) speaks to a singular response to a fairly significant event.
-don
by Don
Sun Jul 03, 2011 7:41 am
 
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Re: Conservation

nice thread! This is just amazing read so I just had to say thank you.
by jeffseele
Thu Jul 07, 2011 3:18 am
 
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South Carolina Max List

ENTS,

I have also completed the first version of the South Carolina Max Dimension List. Thanks to Jess Riddle for helping me with this. If anyone has data please send it to me.

Tyler
by Tyler
Wed Jun 29, 2011 9:59 am
 
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Re: Ricketts Glen?

Robert,

I've been to Ricketts Glen many times. Bruce and I wrote it up in the Sierra Club Guide to Ancient Forests of the Northeast. I'e posted on it on the BBS. Although it has some fairly large, tall trees, Its geology is better than its trees, with the exception of tree ages, which are extremely advanced.

Bob
by dbhguru
Wed Jul 13, 2011 9:39 am
 
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Re: How To Make Better Nature Photos

Mario/Marc-
Wow, what nice cameras/lens you use! Do you always go out with your full complement of camera gear?

I started out several decades ago, with a Nikon body and added lenses over the years...got to carrying such a large case that it got in the way of being in the woods.

I've probably gone to the other extreme recently, with the purchase of a Sony Cybershot HX9V which has a 35mm equivalent of a 24mm-360mm zoom, 16 Megapixel resolution. I've only had a little bit of time in the woods, but will attach a macro image of some fresh Douglas Fir cones.

DSC00400.JPG

Don
by Don
Wed Jul 13, 2011 6:03 pm
 
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Re: Hudson Highlands State Park

hi All,

During a week off, I hiked part of Breakneck Ridge in Hudson Highlands State Park. It was a lovely day and I was just introduced to photosynth, an app for a smartphone that allows instant creation of panoramic pictures. sometimes the pans turn out decently.

below is a picture of the Hudson Highlands with Storm King directly across the river. i almost always am taken aback when i consider these scenes just 60 or less north of NYC.

neil

BreakneckRidgePhotoSynthPan.JPG
by Neil
Sat Jul 16, 2011 9:35 am
 
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The Dunes

WNTS-ENTS (or just NTS),

Monica and I are once again in the incomparable Great Sand Dunes National Park. We were going to camp tonight, but wimped out. Camping is tomorrow night. It is my 70th birthday present. I get to test my mettle against the Dunes - wilderness camping.

Here are some images of the Dunes taken from our current comfortable place of rest. The first image shows Star Dune, the highest dune in the NP. The literature says it is 750 feet high, but if you climb it from the southwest, you put on more than 800 feet elevation.If you climb it directly from Sand Creek on the west, you'll put on around 850 feet.

GSD-Dunes-1.jpg

The peaks on the horizon include Crestone Peak and Crestone Needle (on the right). Both are 14,000-footers. Crestone is 14,300 feet based on NAVD88. The highest peak in the range id Blanca at 14,351, again on NAVD88.

GSD-Dunes-2.jpg

This is a more encompassing shot. Star Dune is left of center. The Crestones show up on the right and to their left is Kit Carson and Humbolt, two more fourteeners.

GSD-Dunes-3.jpg

The last shot shows the Dune wall. Monica and I will climb it tomorrow. So this old cowboy had better get his rest.

GSD-Dunes-4.jpg

Bob over and out.
by dbhguru
Tue Jul 19, 2011 11:26 pm
 
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Re: longtime

hey James,,Well the shed is mostly up 12x16 6' walls and a nice pitch,,The 4x8 sheets of OSB are lots heavier than I remember but all but 1 outside wall is up and shingles are next,,My brushy lot/woods is starting to fill in nicely and in another year or maybe 2 ill start to selectivity thin out some twigs,,Hundreds of the small white-pine are now over 7' tall as are the dozens of Balsoms and lots of the oaks and maples are 3 and 4' tall and my bees have been awesome so far for their first year
by deepwater
Thu Jul 21, 2011 9:18 am
 
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Re: National Scenic Areas Near and Far—A Path for the High C

bbedduhn-
Your moderate approach is appreciated, and fits with a good strategy embraced by Conservation Biologists. Older approaches that essentially would go across an entire forest over a predetermined 'rotation' (say 100 years) made sense only in a short-term economic approach. Our past legislatures, lobbyists, and timber industry saw nothing beyond the dollar sign on the tip of their noses. And that was during the best (we thought then!) of economic times...they could have done so much better.

My question? It's my guess that the area behind the above photo was entirely that of private ownership, and then was liquidated? Much like the Redbird Purchase Unit on the Daniel Boone National Forest, the USFS came in after the fact, and then began the process of reforestation. My point? In these two instances, the USFS were the good guys. In 1965, the USFS purchased lands previously owned, managed for resource extraction by Peabody Coal (strip mined) or Ford (timber). By 1987, I was there with 40 pound sacks of limestone on my back, spreading lime by hand on strip pits, along with grass seed and fertilized in subsequent visits. Locusts were planted where slopes benefited by their soil retentive capacity. We were making a difference.

-Don
by Don
Sat Jul 23, 2011 5:49 pm
 
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Pumpkin ash, first in Arundel, now state champ

This article was in the Baltimore Sun. http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/anne-arundel/bs-ar-big-trees-20110826,0,686476.story?page=1&track=rss

http://www.baltimoresun.com/media/photo/2011-08/64244028.jpg

Pumpkin ash, first in Arundel, now state champ
Tree lovers at Jug Bay have cataloged a species previously unmeasured in Maryland, the swamp-dwelling pumpkin ash.

...."We're going to find that tree, and we're going to mark it," says Swarth, the ecologist who directs the Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary in southernmost Anne Arundel County. One night three weeks earlier, a volunteer naturalist made history by wading into the nutrient-rich water and measuring the circumference, height and breadth of "that tree" — a pumpkin ash. It was the first time a pumpkin ash — far rarer in the state than its look-alike cousin, the green ash — had been mapped, measured and officially recorded in Maryland. Nearly 60 feet high and 3 feet, 7 inches around, the tree was immediately named state champion for the species. Jug Bay employees learned of the event days later when a certificate came in the mail.


It might be worth checking out and getting a good height. The numbers really don't seem that out-of-bounds and it is a species with limited measurements.

Ed Frank
by edfrank
Sat Aug 27, 2011 6:19 pm
 
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Re: Cathedral State Park, WV

Very nice photos JRS! Looks like we even both got some shots of the two double-hemlocks. Just a question, the info guide for Cathedral SP states the hemlocks grow up to 90 feet. They looked a lot taller than 90 ft., didn't they?
by RyanLeClair
Sat Sep 03, 2011 8:48 pm
 
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Re: Poplar Forest Tuliptree climb photos

That little raccoon really made me smile. It also reminded me of James " Bob " Smith's article " Little Assholes "!!
by James Parton
Mon Sep 05, 2011 9:03 pm
 
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Re: Gnarly pine on Stone Mountain

Ents,

I am almost positive this tree is a Virginia pine ( P. virginiana ). The leaves, cones, crown structure, and habitat are all consistent with that species. The leaves and cones look too small for either P. pungens , or P. rigida , and the crown structure doesn't seem quite right.

I also have vague memories of small statured P. taeda on Stone Mountain Georgia. It's kind of a strectch to call those montane though since Stone Mountain is a monadnock well out into the Piedmont.

Jess
by Jess Riddle
Tue Sep 13, 2011 11:09 pm
 
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Re: See how fast wildfire spreads - Texas Parks and Wildlife

James:

This might be more details than you want, but here it is anyway.

Basal scorch can kill a tree if most of the circumference of the cambium at the base is killed. For conifers and oaks with thick bark, the fire would have to last a long time for heat to penetrate the bark to living cambial tissue underneath (basically, number of minutes of exposure to heat from fire necessary to kill cambium = 2.9 x bark thickness in cm squared). so for 1 cm thick bark, thats 2.9 minutes, 11.6 minutes for 2 cm bark and 26 minutes for 3 cm bark. Based on that I would say the larger conifers in the video will survive.

However, there is also mortality from crown scorch--foliage killed by rising hot air above the flames. Foliar scorch is very important for evergreen species like pines and spruces with long leaf life spans (2-8 years), whereas its not very important for deciduous trees that will lose their leaves whether there is a fire or not. One minute at 60-70 degrees C will kill foliage. The height of foliar scorch is 0.094 I ^^2/3. Fireline intensity, I, in Kw/m is directly related to flame height. Based on the flame height and tilt in the video, I would say that scorch will occur up to about 20 feet, so that 30-50% of the crowns might be scorched. Based on relationships between percentage of the crown with scorched foliage and mortality, 30-50% crown scorch for pines means fairly low mortality on the range of 5-10%.

Its hard to tell what the extent of basal and crown scorch is until some weeks later. Lots of models have been published that predict mortality based on the extent of basal and foliar scorch in conifers, and based on height of trunk char in deciduous trees.

Lee
by Lee Frelich
Tue Sep 13, 2011 2:27 pm
 
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Re: The Colorado River: Running Near Empty

Robert,

Periodically, you and I come to the same conclusion. If there is a higher moral court out there somewhere that will eventually judge humanity on the basis of how we have treated other life forms and the overall life support systems of the Earth, then we're in big trouble. Really big trouble.

Bob
by dbhguru
Sat Sep 24, 2011 8:16 am
 
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Re: The Colorado River: Running Near Empty

jamesrobertsmith wrote:This is the kind of thing that lets me know that nothing is going to get better until the human race dies off. We're hell bound to destroy Mother Earth.


How right you probably are. It is something we commonly talk about on the druid forums. Many neo-druids are avid activists.
by James Parton
Sun Sep 25, 2011 12:46 am
 
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Re: Texas Drought and Trees

Texans don't believe in global warming or evolution. Both are commy pinko attempts to enslave patriotic, gun toting, God fearing, homophobic Texans.
Joe
by Joe
Sun Sep 25, 2011 4:21 am
 
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New here

Hello,

I am a retired ‘green’ professional, specialized in tree care and urban trees. Nowadays I run a small consultant office to stay active in tree care business and spent more time to visit monumental trees in Scandinavia, Germany and Great Brittain. Before I incidentally used a pencil & measure tape, nose-cross or the Blume-Leiss apparatus for measuring tree heights.
Nowadays I come more and more in situations I want to know the right height of a tree. For that I bought last year the Nikon 550A Ranger-Finder. After some experiments and talks with college’s (thank you Jeroen) I think I am finding the right way to measure the height of trees with this Nikon 550A.

With pleasure I read the publication ” The Really, Really Basics of Laser Rangefinder/Clinometer Tree Height Measurements” dated January 12, 2010.
About the wider beam of the 550A than the 440: can anybody tell how wide it is at a certain distance?
by wmuller
Thu Oct 06, 2011 5:54 pm
 
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Re: Hemlocks Still Abundant Despite Adelgid Infestation

Everything I've seen and everything I know up to now tells me that there will be total wipeout of mid-aged and mature Eastern and Carolina Hemlock in its range. The only limitation on HWA is low enough average winter temperatures, parts of northeastern U.S and Canada have a reprieve for now. There may be some limitation where HWA can't reach geographically isolated hemlock populations, but I think that's a fringe case. As we've discussed in the past imported beetles have failed miserably. One of the big issues identified is that that the eastern hemlock's release of defensive turpenoid compounds are out of sync with adelgid breeding cycles. Imported Asian beetles that feed on HWA cannot do it on their own (if they could sustain their populations) the tree has to be able to participate in controlling HWA.
-AJ
by AndrewJoslin
Mon Oct 10, 2011 4:15 pm
 
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ENTS Evening of Music, Poetry and Prose 10/15

Dear Friends,

On Saturday, October 15, at 7:30 pm, Music at The Charlemont Inn will present the "Sixth Annual Eastern Native Tree Society Evening of Music, Poetry and Prose" at The Charlemont Inn on the Mohawk Trail, Route 2, in Charlemont, MA. Performers will be Charlotte Dewey, soprano, David Schneider, clarinet, and Monica Jakuc Leverett, piano. Writers Joan Maloof and Norma Sims Roche, and poet Susan Middleton will be readers of their own original work. Writers Carol Edelstein and Robin Barber will read a selection by W.S. Merwin. Admission for the concert/reading is free, but donations to the Eastern Native Tree Society will be gratefully accepted. The concert will be preceded by hors d'oeuvres at 5:15 pm and dinner at 6 pm at the inn at $25/person, not including drinks. Reservations can be made by email at dbhguru@comcast.net.

The evening's music, poetry and prose celebrate nature in all its glory, with a special emphasis on trees. The program will open with what has become the ENTS themesong: a Donald Swann song based on a J.R.R. Tolkien text spoken by the leader of the Ents. Soprano Charlotte Dewey will also sing "Lotusblume" by Robert Schumann. The readers listed above will be interspersed with the musical selections. Other music on the program will include piano and clarinet works by Robert Schumann, and two clarinet pieces by Camille Saint-Saens, including a transcription of the famous "The Swan" from Carnival of the Animals. Monica Jakuc Leverett will play Debussy's "Clair de lune." Composer Jim Ballard (formerly of Charlemont, MA) has written a number of settings of Joyce Kilmer's famous poem "Trees," and Charlotte Dewey will sing two of them, followed by a Gershwin clarinet "Promenade" as a finale to the program.

All of the performers are frequently heard in the Pioneer Valley and beyond. All writers are local, with the exception of Joan Maloof, who is a featured speaker at the Forest Summit Conference at Holyoke Community College on October 13 and 14 ( Http://www.hcc.edu/news/events/annual-events/forest-summit ), and the author of Teaching the Trees: Lessons from the Forest, and Among the Ancients: Adventures in the Eastern Old Growth Forests.

I hope you can join us for a delightful afternoon and a delicious dinner. For those of you who like to frolic in the woods, I will be sending shortly an email describing the daytime activities on Saturday October 15.

Best wishes,

Monica
by edfrank
Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:25 pm
 
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Partitioning Diversity

The Journal of Ecology's editor opened a 30 page forum to debate on my brother Lou's papers on proper usage of diversity indices. The editor also made the announcement that my brother's 2007 paper may be the greatest advancement in measuring diversity for ecology since Whittaker's paper 50 years ago!!! My brother, Lou, is really excited about it! I've attached the editor's comments and like to brag about my brother a bit...

Regards,

Paul Jost
by pauljost
Mon Aug 02, 2010 11:27 pm
 
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Re: Partitioning Diversity

I have a brief update. Because of Lou's recent achievements ( http://www.loujost.com , http://www.ecominga.net our family has just been told that Lou has been awarded the virtual equivalent of an alumni of the year award for 2011 from Lawrence University, http://www.lawrence.edu . It has not been formally announced, but is described as follows:

"The George B. Walter '36 Service to Society Award
This award is presented to recognize alumni of Lawrence University or Milwaukee-Downer College who best exemplify the ideals of a liberal education through socially useful service in their community, the nation, and/or the world. This award honors George B. Walter '36, alumnus, faculty member, educator, and dean of men, whose work at the college and beyond promoted his conviction that every individual can and should make a positive difference in her or his world."

Regards,

Paul
by pauljost
Fri Dec 24, 2010 12:43 pm
 
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Re: Osage Orange

NTS: One of the local common name for Osage-orange in WV and one that kids love to use is 'Monkey Brain' tree.
TS
by tsharp
Tue Oct 18, 2011 9:33 pm
 
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cron