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"The President" giant sequioa, SNP, CA

The December 2012 issue of National Geographic Magazine features as its cover story an article on "The President," a giant sequoia in Sequoia National Park California.

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The text of the article can be viewed online, but by doing so you will miss some the beautiful images from the print version of the article and a large scale poster of the entire tree also available in the print edition. The article is by David Quammen, and the photographs are by Micheal Nichols who did the December 2009 portraits of giant redwoods in National Geographic

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/12/sequoias/quammen-text

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The web version of the poster is here: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/12/sequoias/gatefold-image

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/12/sequoias/img/snow-tree-645x1708.jpg

The article describes Steve Sillett's teams effort to map the detailed branch structure of one of the world's largest trees by volume. Will Blozan was one of the team hired to do the mapping.

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by edfrank
Sun Nov 18, 2012 11:06 am
 
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Re: Fused redwoods

Great humping Jove! I MUST see these trees before I croak!
by jamesrobertsmith
Thu Feb 14, 2013 1:02 pm
 
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Re: Fused redwoods

Fredrik,
Here are a couple of my favorite fused redwoods. In both of these cases, the tree's footprints are like enormous ovals. Both examples are incredibly thin if you were to examine them from the side. If I were to take a picture from a side angle, the tree would look ordinary and you'd never know it was part of a "wall of wood."
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-acyyCFQouaM/UR22VLQCh9I/AAAAAAAAJnQ/F_EOL0s1UZE/s512/SANY0078.JPG

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-N-74E4KEBsk/UR22rRD44nI/AAAAAAAAJnc/BVro45DjVxE/s512/SANY0156.JPG
Fused redwood above only had a cbh of 49 feet 3 in.
by Mark Collins
Fri Feb 15, 2013 12:25 am
 
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Re: Fused redwoods

Fredrik and Larry,

Here are some rows of tree from Olympic National Park:

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Granted these are not redwoods, but the images illustrate a process. These are all individual trees, with separate origins growing on a fallen nurse log. To me, based upon the photos alone, and experience with much smaller multitrunk trees, I would suggest that some of these clusters might be growth from the same root system as is common with Larry's Live Oaks. But that many may be separate trees that initially grew on nurse logs as in the examples above. Redwoods, from what I have read, easily fuse together both at the base and among the limbs themselves. So because of the ease of fusion, the two forms would be indistinguishable in many cases without genetic testing. If the trunks were obviously oriented in a line or wall, that would strongly suggest growth on a fallen nurse log. If they were in a clump around a common center, that would suggest growth from a shared root mass. I would guess that the roots themselves may fuse together also even if they were distinct individuals initially, they may share some root function, but the trunks would be genetically distinct.

Edward Frank
by edfrank
Sun Feb 17, 2013 11:50 pm
 
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Re: Fused redwoods

Here's a wall of wood from James Irvine Trail in Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park.

Want to get this one with a wider lens sometime.

...
by mdvaden
Tue Feb 19, 2013 4:10 am
 
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Re: Fused redwoods

I got a couple of shots of the same cluster (It was hard to miss) when I was out there in 2010:

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I also climbed up inside it, and it was more like a big cluster with several big dead trunks in the middle. More distressingly, there were some big holes that looked big enough to swallow a person up there. Looking straight up gave some nice cathedral views:

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by Rand
Tue Feb 19, 2013 8:08 pm
 
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Just about 80 feet short

In 1985 my very ederly Grandfather, who was born and raised in New Jersey, made his first and only trip to California to see the giant sequoias and hopefuly measure a few of them. What did he bring to do this? A 25ft tape measure. He actually had no clue they were so big. I still get a kick out of this photo. Most north easterners really have no clue as to how massive trees can actually get. I believe the tree is the General Sherman.
by John Harvey
Thu Feb 28, 2013 12:55 am
 
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Re: Fused redwoods

I was dealing with a burst pipe, wet drywall and carpets when the above posts and photos of redwoods momentarily took my breath away...while I still am dealing with the joys of homeownership, I now have a little time to post some photos from a March 2012 visit to some redwoods. They were in Prairie Creek Redwoods, some 50 miles north of Eureka and 25 miles south of Crescent City on Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway off of Highway 101. Some I include for the 'fused' thread, the others for their own value...
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by Don
Sun Mar 03, 2013 3:03 am
 
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Re: Fused redwoods

I came across this excellent example of a fused redwood over the weekend. Many fused redwoods seem to have one smaller tree attached to the side like this one pictured. To walk around to the backside of this incredible tree and see the giant fire cave was breathtaking. This fused redwood had a cbh of 58 feet, 6 in.
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-YJLfgCDgfo8/UVob5svJr-I/AAAAAAAAJ4Q/88MshdEX7sw/s812/SANY0053.JPG

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-JqjuHR6LdhQ/UVocvoMSVpI/AAAAAAAAJ4s/SJAXQqRT9j8/s607/SANY0058.JPG
by Mark Collins
Mon Apr 01, 2013 8:12 pm
 
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Field Report, my first trip to the redwoods w/photos...

First off let me say to those who have never been...you must go at least once before you die. Even if it means selling all your baseball cards, buying a used car instead of a new one, or taking out a second mortgage. I will be going at least once a year from here on out, as soon as this August for a more extensive hiking/searching trip.
I made this trip with my wife and my 1 year old son. Of course I wouldn't have it any other way, however it did limit a lot of what I could have done in 5 days. I was caring the 30 lb little guy in a baby backpack almost the whole time so unfortunately I didn't make it back to Grove Of The Titans or hike Boyscout Trail for safety reasons. Next time I will. That being said I was able to make it to, Muir Woods, Montgomery Woods, Richardson Grove, Humboldt Redwoods, Prairie Creek, and Jed Smith, and even spend the last day of the trip in San Fran as a treat for my wife who hiked many miles with me.
My first instinct, after the pure Awe of so many big trees was to immediately find the largest ones I could, known or unknown. I broke my 100ft tape in the process but did visit 6 or 7 trees over 50ft CBH and many 40+. I located the famed Arco Giant, 11th largest coast redwood, Giant Tree, Big Tree, Brotherhood Tree, and many more without much work, with the fam tagging behind. In the process I did come up with different observations and opinions:

1 I always thought that Muir woods would be a waste of time and many seem to trash it online. However, I was here between 7am and 9am before the traffic started and I found it wonderful. The trees are all a brilliant red, not the drab grey of the northern trees. Even though they are not as big as the parks to the north, they kind of set me up for what I could expect and knowing the trees were only getting bigger was exciting.

2 Montgomery woods is a B@!* to get to. The drive up Orr Springs Road can tie knots in your gut with all the loops and dangerous twists but the pay off is amazing. Isolated, gigantic, tall, blazing red trees. Breathtaking and peaceful.

3 From what I saw, Prairie creek is a better visit than Jed Smith as a whole and is my favorite all around park. minus the grove of the Titans, I would say its trees are bigger too, on average.

4 Aside from what RedwoodHikes.com (great website) says, I found Founders Grove to be more enjoyable than Stout Grove. The trees are taller obviously and other than the Stout Tree, the trees are bigger. If the Dyerville Giant was still standing, founders grove would blow it away. (As long as your there early in the AM)

5 Something that's not mentioned much that makes the JSSP and PCRSP so grand are the large Sitka Spruce and Douglass Fur along side the redwoods.
I took hundreds of photos but below Ill post some of my favorites.
by John Harvey
Wed Apr 03, 2013 8:27 pm
 
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Re: Field Report, my first trip to the redwoods w/photos...

Some of my favorite trees here, Ill post a few more later.
by John Harvey
Wed Apr 03, 2013 8:36 pm
 
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World's 8th Largest Tree - Lost Monarch Sequoia sempervire

Finally think I got the shot I've been hoping for of Lost Monarch, the 8th (maybe 7th) largest known tree in the world.

It's nice to see that this entire side of this Coast Redwood is being treated pretty delicately by the few visitors that manage to find it.
by mdvaden
Thu May 02, 2013 5:57 pm
 
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2nd Growth Coast Redwood Climb video

This is very detailed documentation of tree climbing process. This climb happened April 2013, it was my first climb on Coast Redwood, intentionally choosing 2nd-growth to climb on. Climbing old-growth redwood is most likely illegal since most are in highly protected groves. Not that I wouldn't pass up a legitimate legal opportunity.

I used a helmet cam and an iPhone to capture the video. The climb was dedicated to my younger sister Dorothy who had visited that particular site with me in years past and who passed away a year ago April.

Typical for solo climbing, especially on a wild tree, and a new species for me, I do a lot of talking to myself as part of the climbing. I also try to provide some verbal info for the benefit of the viewer.

At one point during the climb I felt the entire tree shake from the roots up, very interesting! I guess it could have been a small earthquake but it was quick and didn't have the lingering quality of an earthquake tremor. There was no wind movement. Mysteries abound out in the woods and trees.

Climbing a small redwood (80' or so tree) to access a larger tree
Part 1

Working up the through the crown of the larger tree
Part 2

Going to the top
Part 3

I didn't measure the tree but based on my rope length this redwood was probably in the 210' range.
-AJ
by AndrewJoslin
Tue Jun 04, 2013 1:50 pm
 
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Re: European Records in Finland

NTS,

In the message # 1 of this thread, I told about the record common juniper ( Juniperus communis ). Its height was 16.4 m in 2011.

A juniper, which has probably been still taller, has been found in Hauho, Finland. It was found by Anu Tuominen who stands at the juniper in 2006 in the photo below taken by Jukka Siltanen.

HauhoJuniperus.jpg
Jukka Lehtonen (with who I measured the 16.4-m juniper in 2011) recently visited the Hauho juniper with Anu and Jukka S. but it had unfortunately been snapped by wind 2-3 years ago.

HauhoJuniperus-snag.jpg
They measured the trunk lenght as 17.65 m. From the trunk lenght, and taking into account the leaning angle, which was estimated from photos, it can be estimated that the juniper has perhaps been about 17 m (56 ft) tall. The girth is 78 cm.

Kouta
by KoutaR
Tue Jun 04, 2013 2:33 pm
 
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European Records in Finland

NTS,

Jukka Lehtonen from Finnish Forest Research Institute showed me in August some Finnish height record trees. He had measured them in 90's with Vertex hypsometer and now I measured them with Nikon Laser 550A S. If I could get with laser close to Jukka's measurements, they would be European records, too. Note that these trees grow at a latitude of ~60 degrees.

Common Juniper ( Juniperus communis )

Common juniper has the widest distribution of any tree or shrub species. It is divided to several varieties, most of them being only shrubs, but particularly the European variety (var. communis ) often attains tree form, generally up to 5-6 meters (16-20 ft), occasionally taller. It attains its maximum size around the Baltic sea. The record juniper is located in Sääksjärvi, Mäntsälä. According to Jukka's measurement, it was 16.8 meters tall in 90's. My measurement was 16.4 m (53.8 ft) . CBH is 89 cm. Its age is very hard to tell without coring it, but the tree has been mentioned to be exceptionally tall already 100 years ago. It grows in Norway spruce ( Picea abies ) - silver birch ( Betula pendula ) forest, in the immediate vicinity there are plenty of exceptionally large junipers. In the photo below, Jukka and the record juniper.

SaaksjarviJuniperus.jpg

Accroding to the conifers.org, there is a 18.5-meter common juniper in Sweden, but it is probably not laser measured. A forest researcher measured decades ago a 19-meter common juniper in Finland, but he promised to the land-owner not to reveal the location. The researcher has passed away and so we cannot ask about it anymore.


Goat Willow ( Salix caprea )

Goat willow has a very wide distribution, almost whole Europe and to east Asia, and it is very common particularly in the European boreal zone. Unlike most large willow species, the habitat of goat willow is not restricted to floodplains and riversides. In the boreal zone, it is a part of pioneer forest vegetation besides birches, aspen ( Populus tremula ) and grey alder ( Alnus incana ). The North American equivalent is probably Bebb willow ( S. bebbiana ). The record goat willow is located in Nuuksio National Park, only 20 km from the city center of Helsinki. This tree was the biggest surprese to me: Jukka's measurement from 90's was 24.5 m. It was probably close to the truth and the tree had still grown: my measurement was 26.2 m (86.0 ft) . The CBH is 66 cm. The tree grows in Norway spruce dominated forest in a small valley, with silver birch, downy birch ( B. pubescens ), black alder ( Alnus glutinosa ), aspen, Norway maple ( Acer platanoides ) and small-leaved linden ( Tilia cordata ). In the photo below, the record willow, Norway spruces and two downy birches in the background.

NuuksioSalix_caprea.jpg

Still another photo of the grove. The record goat willow on the left with a yellow band. Norway spruces, shrub-like rowans ( Sorbus aucuparia ) and two silver birches with white-black trunks on the left-center, the right one of which is 33 m (108 ft) tall, it would be very tall for the species in Central Europe, too.

Nuuksio-forest.jpg


Grey Alder ( Alnus incana )

This species also has a very wide distribution in Europe, Asia and North America. It is divided to several subspecies. Like in common juniper, the European subspecies (subsp. incana ) becomes taller than the North American one. In boreal Europe, grey alder is very common as a pioneer tree and on lake shores. In central Europe the species is largely restricted to mountains. Jukka's record grey alder had fallen, but there were equally tall individuals next to it. The height of the new record grey alder is 27.2 m (89.2 ft) and CBH 100 cm. It grows in Ruotsinkylä, Tuusula, in 90-year-old forest dominated by +30 m tall Norway spruces. The forest type is the most fertile in Finland. Other trees in the grove are black alder, aspen, silver and downy birch, and bird cherry ( Prunus padus ). The understory is dominated by lady fern ( Athyrium filix-femina ).

RuotsinkylaAlnus_incana.jpg


European Rowan = European Mountain-ash ( Sorbus aucuparia )

Rowan also has a very wide distribution across Eurasia. It is very similar to American Mountain-ash ( S. americana ). The record rowan was our new find. Jukka pointed it to me as we walked to the alder group mentioned above. Its height is 22.3 m (73.2 ft) and CBH 112 cm.

RuotsinkylaSorbus_aucuparia.jpg

In more southern locations, there are probably taller rowans, but measurements are still missing. In the British Tree Register, there is even 28 m (92 ft) tall rowan, but it is probably not laser measured.

UPDATE SEPTEMBER 2014: The tallest reliably measured rowan is now 23.5 m:
http://www.monumentaltrees.com/en/deu/bavaria/regen/9732_hollbachgspreng/

Kouta
by KoutaR
Wed Nov 16, 2011 3:03 pm
 
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Highest Leaf Now 379.46 ft. Another Redwood Breaches 370 ft.

Hyperion was measured last week by Dr. Steven Sillett with direct tape drop. Result was 155.66 meters, or 379.46 feet. The top is growing slowly, but steadily and has an excellent supporting base. See picture.

Another coast redwood in Redwood National Park, National Geographic Society Tree, AKA Nugget, has just been measured by Dr. Sillett by direct tape drop at 113.05 meter, or 370.89 feet. The top of this tree is vigorous and currently growing nearly 1 feet per year.

See attached pictures from Dr. Sillett.

For those die-hards that manage to find Hyperion, please be careful not to trample the soil around the base. The tree's top is already on the ragged edge of existence and any addtional stresses to its plumbing system could potentially kill the top leader. The best chance for Hyperion to reach 380' is if the tree is admired from afar.

Michael Taylor

WNTS VP
AFA California Big Trees Coordinator
http://www.landmarktrees.net
by M.W.Taylor
Wed Sep 21, 2011 4:10 pm
 
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Re: Exploring the Redwood Forest (Humboldt Redwoods State Pa

JRS, I usually camp near the creek and try to stay away from sleeping under the big trees. Perhaps it's to avoid the possibility of gitting hit by a big branch. It's so quiet at night that if a tree fell nearby, the noise would be absolutely terrifying. So far, I've always had a fitful sleep when I camp in the redwoods. Friday night, I dreamed that I was visited by horses and a strange prehistoric animal. They were stomping around my head and snarling and sniffing around my ears. To make matters worse, as hard as I tried, I couldn't wake up!
by Mark Collins
Sun Sep 09, 2012 9:41 pm
 
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Re: The sequoia with the greatest ground perimeter - 155 fee

Fredrik,

I was a contractor for Archangel during this time and part of the effort to get Waterfall Tree cloned. I delvered the cuttings via ice chest to their nursery. I have a clone growing at my house of Waterfall. Archangel also cloned nearby Stagg Tree. In Alder Creek Grove also grows the only known wild weeping sequioa. These 2 giant sequoia were the first ancient giant sequoias to be cloned from a cutting. Prior to this it had not been officially documented although I successfully rooted a 1400 year old giant sequioa from a 1" thick branch the year before.

Michael Taylor
by M.W.Taylor
Tue Jun 11, 2013 8:23 pm
 
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Re: Stout Grove Jedediah Smith Redwoods SP

Ever seen the opening in Stout Tree, that some might describe like a coin slot? I was curious how big the cavity is. Can't get my whole camera in it, but did put a flash in there and fired it remotely. Sometime before the wound closes entirely, I want to disassemble my lens and attach it again on the inside, but need a step stool.

There's a wooden chimney going up a ways, charcoal, spider webs etc.. Apparently Stout grove had a lot of fallen branches and stuff on the forest floor there once upon a time. Unless it was a lightning strike that burned downward. But I suspect flames from bottom upward judging by other trunks in the grove.

Stout_slot_600.jpg
Stout_Slot_1.jpg
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by mdvaden
Tue Sep 24, 2013 7:36 pm
 
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tree in someone's yard

This is probably the largest tree that I have seen in someone's yard. I love big trees. But there is something extra special about a big tree being in someone's yard. This tree is in the front yard of a friend's brother's neighbor in Pensacola, FL. I would love to have a tree anywhere near that big in my yard. If I had had a tape measure with me, I would have measured the circumference of it. Oh well, next time.
by tclikesbigtrees
Wed Dec 04, 2013 2:29 pm
 
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New Record Trees in Gulfo Dulce

Living in Costa Rica now, my wife Connie and I visited both sides of Gulfo Dulce last week. The gulf separates the mainland from the Osa Peninsula, which according to various web sites contains the largest area of old growth (primary) lowland tropical forest in Central America, with the possible exception of the Darien state in Panama. We visited my old friend Steve Prchal who runs an arthropod education and research facility at the edge of Corcovado National Park, then we went to the La Gamba Research Center on the opposite side of the gulf adjacent to Piedres Blancas National Park. Because we had more time there, I was able to visit superlative trees for measurement purposes at La Gamba. Daniel Jenking Aguilera, who works on forest restoration and reforestation projects lead me to two trees that certainly did not disappoint. I will start with the tree with the greatest volume and end with the tallest one.

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by Bart Bouricius
Thu Jan 30, 2014 5:43 pm
 
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Re: Grove of the Titans and Atlast Grove explored today

A few more trees, unnamed, unknown, or name not known. A couple more Titans too.
by John Harvey
Tue Apr 01, 2014 9:23 am
 
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Why big trees? My personal story.

Just something I typed up tonight, maybe you can relate?

People often ask me why I run around the country chasing big trees. They ask me how I can “hunt” something that cant run or move. They ask me why these giants of the forest are so important to me. The answer is not really a simple one. I believe I was destined to find them. I believe this because there were many incidents in my life that led me in this direction.

When I was a small child I had a vivid, translucent, dream. I was lost inside a thick forest of sky scraping trees. I had no direction or purpose. Tangled in thick and thorn I struggled on until I came out into a clearing, a grassy glade of soft sunlight. Before me, upon a plateau, was a giant tree, a true “father of the forest”. Its gnarled, twisting trunk, seemed suspended high in the air. It was a species no longer found in our world. Its girth still matches the largest redwoods I have seen in person to this day. Its un-tapering height still has no earthly rival. As I gazed upon it, a deep peace came over me. I felt found. I had answers and justification for the wilderness I had traversed. An ancientness covered my soul. Over the years I have had thousands of similar dreams but none like the first.

My first reality based experience with a large tree was when I was 11 years old. Two of my friends and I were trying to blaze a path to a fishing hole through a second growth tulip poplar forest. We went astray and came upon the edge of a farmers field. When we climbed the fence, there was a massive tulip poplar standing before us. I had always carried the memory of my dream and this seemed eerily similar to me. All three of us stood there for a minute admiring the tree. It stood around 140' high and 22' around the base. Its trunk only seemed to increase in size as it rose. It was definitely old growth and many times older than the trees around it. When I mentioned the tree to my father and other locals in the area, they all knew of it. Many of them had played inside its hollow trunk as children. Even my friends 85 year old grandmother claimed it to be a giant when she was a child. This experience didn’t change my life until I took on a new job many years later. A job my sister had found for me when I was out of work and desperate.

As an employee of a tree trimming service and a subcontractor of the power company, I spent my days high in a bucket, cutting branches away from power lines. Sometimes I was on the ground chipping the logs and branches that fell from above. It was hard, dirty, and dangerous work, but the pay was fair and for a twenty three year old without a college degree, it was a blessing. Sure, poison ivy year round, dog bites, reckless drivers, possible loss of limbs to chain saws and wood chippers, falling logs, and risk of electrocution isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, but there is something about one of the worlds most dangerous jobs that assures a young man that he is a man. The crew was filled with real men; burly, hairy, strong, yet mostly uneducated specimens of manhood. This is why it always impressed me when the men began talking about the trees they were trimming. They knew everything about them. Most of the men were veterans and knew how to identify over one hundred different types of trees. They knew their size potential, could estimate their ages, identify their flowers and fruits, and most of all, knew the easiest ways to chop them down. You see, most of the job was in fact trimming, but there were always jobs when felling was required as well. I never minded felling a tree if the job called for it but one job in particular made me uneasy. Next to a road, wedged between power lines and a golf course, was a gigantic Silver Maple. The foreman placed his hand on the massive trunk , turned to the crew and said, “Boys this the second largest Silver Maple in the state, and today she has to come down. “ The tree had been trimmed many times before but was growing too large to be in its location, so the decision was made. I stood next to the bucket truck and watched as one of my crew removed the top branches. Later two of the more experienced men sawed through the trunk and felled the giant. After I helped cut the downed tree into smaller pieces, I walked over to the stump. I got down on my hands and knees and started counting the rings of the tree. One, two, three…eighty-five, eighty-six, eighty-seven…two hundred ten, two hundred eleven, two hundred twelve …Two hundred and thirty years old, or at least that’s what I thought I counted. This tree was alive before the Declaration of Independence and it took less than two hours to bring it down. Although it didn’t change my opinion on felling trees, it did put a tinge of sadness in my heart, and more importantly, peaked my interest in the history of New Jersey’s largest and oldest trees. The rest of my time on the job focused on saving trees rather than destroying them. That summer, I would call up my friends, return to the woods, and rediscover my ancient tulip poplar once again, this time with a whole new admiration.

Over the years I made a point to visit this poplar on the most important days of my life. Through grief and joy, I was looking for answers. I sought the peace I remembered from that slumber so long ago. My girlfriends knew her. My family saw her. The day my grandmother died, I visited her. The morning my first child was born, I sat beneath her branches. When I had a big decision to make, I meditated there with her.
One morning in late 2012 I made my way back through the forest and found that the tree had fallen in a storm a week earlier. Several smaller and weaker trees were shattered in the fall. I had lost a friend. I took one of her last live leaves home with me. It is nestled inside an album next to my first photo of the tree.

Over the years I have beheld some of the worlds largest, tallest, and oldest. I have found lost and forgotten giants and wandered through secret and hidden groves of enchanted trees. I may have dreamed, but I never dreamed anything like this. Wide awake and full of wonder, I’m still amazed at the natural treasures in our world. In spite of this, people continue to ask me the same questions. Why search? Why the trees? Why carry around my childhood dream? I answer with this...

I’ve always found peace in the quiet and solitary places. I’ve drawn my inspiration from the forest and mountains. I have learned that the most perfect peace one can find is alone, surrounded by the arms of nature and God. I can only imagine what it would have been like to explore America when it was an untamed and wild forest. The great unknown and the possibility of discovery has always enchanted me.
I have lived so many places and I have lost so much; my dearest friends, my closest lovers, and myself at times. The changes I have experienced have led me to believe that nothing in life is secure. Friends and family die and lovers leave. Dreams are blown away like dust and precious times slip through our fingers like sand. Uncertainty rages like an angry ocean and the future rises like a tidal wave to wash away the happy moments that we cling to. We are only left with memories. We are only left with ourselves.
I guess in a way I can relate with my giant trees. Some have stood against all odds through a millennium or more. Standing tall and weathering a thousand ferocious storms, steadfast and determined. Countless others smaller and some many times greater ripped away from the earth only to return to dust in their presence. Some were alive as many as two hundred years before the founding of our great nation, watching the children of many generations play beneath their branches.
I too know what it is like to see those close to me die and to weather the storms of life when it seemed as though I was standing on my own. I know what it is like to stand alone, in the middle of a forest or the edge of a field wishing someone would pass by and see how strong and beautiful I was. I have also felt fragile in times of uncertainty and wished to be mighty and everlasting. This is why I admire these old and quiet giants. I stand in awe in their presence and somehow relate to their old and scared trunks. Some have lost their mightiest and most prized branches as I have lost so many important pieces of me. As I sit beneath their shade I am reminded that only the strong survive. Something within this tree and something within me has weathered these storms, and that is why we both stand here today.

In short, I realize now that the tree in my dream as a child was in fact......me. Once I endured the storms of life, I became the tree and I was found. Peace had to be realized through trail and fire.
by John Harvey
Sat Apr 12, 2014 12:21 am
 
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Coast Redwood bigger than average

Found a particularly large Coast Redwood with Chris Atkins, the past few days. I won't be listing the dimensions or name. It appears to be the largest single Coast Redwood trunk known. More about it and other redwoods found are on the following link:

Read more at > http://www.mdvaden.com/redwood_year_discovery.shtml

One reason for omitting the trunk diameter in this post, is it will be tape wrapped again, possibly climbed and measured. We plan to explore more this summer, in several parks. Even repeating areas that have been explored. Its evident how possible it can be to pass by something this big first time through an area.

Updates will be added to that page, or possibly here in replies following.
by mdvaden
Thu Jun 05, 2014 4:19 pm
 
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New dbh champ for SESE

On May 15, 2014, Joseph Hall and I discovered a giant single-stem redwood while bushwhacking through a remote area in Northern California. Our preliminary measurements suggested this SESE's diameter was larger than Lost Monarch.

For independent verification, I returned to the tree with Zane Moore and Luke Adams. The difference between upslope ground level and downslope ground level was 16', so we painstakingly performed an even tape wrap at upper ground level. The result was 23.95'. This measurement was treated as 8' above average ground level, and Zane then plugged in Bob Van Pelt's functional dbh equation. This yielded a functional dbh of 27.2'.

In our opinion 27.2' is a conservative number, because the functional dbh equation accounts for an average SESE taper, and the taper between 4.5' and 8' on this tree is well above average.

We can say with confidence that it is a new dbh champ for redwoods.

Joseph and I have named the tree "Crocodile".
by John Montague
Mon Jun 30, 2014 6:48 pm
 
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