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Tunnel Tree - a remarkable sequoia

If you’ve read about the Tunnel Tree in Wendell Flint’s book To Find the Biggest Tree (2002) and wondered what to look for I have attached a photo with the undersigned in front for comparison. The tree is, to quote Flint, “a remarkable 57 feet across its vast base” and stands in Atwell Mill Grove west of the Paradise Ridge Trail (Flint’s book has a map). I have never seen a photo of it before - hope it inspires a visit!
Fredrik
by F.Jakobsson
Sun Jan 20, 2013 4:02 pm
 
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The only example of a weeping sequoia living in the forest?!

In contrast to the Tunnel Tree, the record wide giant sequoia in my previous post, follow photos of a slender weeping sequoia growing in Alder Creek Grove, according to Wendell Flint: “the only living example of a weeping sequoia living in the forest. Other weeping sequoias are cultivated in nurseries. The branches of this tree fall directly downward, so that the tree is a skinny column. It is a juvenile tree, and since it is so rare and so easily harmed, I’m not saying where it is.” (To Find the Biggest Tree, 2002, Alder Creek Grove chapter, page 79). Wendell Flint credits his cousin and hiking companion Robert Bergen for spotting the weeping sequoia.

As with the Tunnel Tree I haven’t seen photos of this one before. Hope you find them interesting. Giant sequoia adjectives such as majestic seem out of place when looking at the weeping sequoia. I read in The Giant Sequoia of the Sierra Nevada (1975) that a specimen in Roath Park in Cardiff, Wales was labeled “the ugliest tree in Britain” :)

Have you seen or heard of a weeping sequoia growing wild someplace else?
Or could this be the singular one?

Fredrik
by F.Jakobsson
Sat Jan 26, 2013 6:19 pm
 
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Re: Tunnel Tree - a remarkable sequoia

All five photos attached are of the Tunnel Tree viewed from different angles and distances.
As you will notice, it looks quite normal when seen from above.
If you’re standing below and facing the Tunnel Tree, the Paradise Ridge Trail is about a minute’s walk away to the right.
Fredrik
(In case you wonder about the editing of my initial post, it consisted of adding a copyright symbol to the photo)
by F.Jakobsson
Wed Jan 30, 2013 5:49 pm
 
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Fused redwoods

The redwoods’ amazing ability to fuse can create remarkable results.
Along Cal Barrel Road in Prairie Creek Redwood State Park a couple of redwoods has fused together at the base creating one impressive trunk.
Higher up the trunks separate.
I have not measured the trunk, but me leaning against the backside gives an approximation of the size.
by F.Jakobsson
Thu Feb 14, 2013 10:38 am
 
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Re: Just about 80 feet short

I didn’t know it was possible to park right next to the General Sherman at such a relatively late date…
Great story and photo!
Fredrik
by F.Jakobsson
Thu Feb 28, 2013 4:36 pm
 
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The sequoia with the greatest ground perimeter - 155 feet

I first came across this extreme tree in To Find the Biggest Tree (1987 & 2002) where it’s unnamed.
Author Wendell Flint just calls it Big Base Tree on his Alder Creek Grove map in the later edition.
The book contains no photo of it.

Dwight Willard in A Guide to the Sequoia Groves of California (2000) calls it Day Tree.
Thoughts on whether Big Base Tree or nearby Stagg Tree may be the tree noticed by Day in 1931 can be found on pages 76 & 78 in Flint’s book (2002).

Recently I found that Archangel Ancient Tree Archive calls it Waterfall Tree.
The organization has taken samples from the tree and cloned it.
To read more and to watch a video from the climbing of and collecting from the Waterfall Tree visit ancienttreearchive.org/roots-sprout-on-waterfall-tree-clones/
Maybe someone happens to know who named it Waterfall Tree?

To find the Big Base Tree Flint suggests clambering through the brush starting at the Stagg Tree.
We did that, but an alternate less bushy route is to pass the Stagg Tree sign and walk the main trail maybe a minute longer until you actually see the Big Base Tree and an overgrown path leading to it.

Fredrik
by F.Jakobsson
Sun Mar 10, 2013 7:14 pm
 
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A giant sequoia Wendell Flint would liked to have measured

In the 1987 edition of To Find the Biggest Tree Wendell Flint writes on page 41 that he and Mike Law on the way to measure the Agassiz Tree “spotted the remnants of what once must have been a really big tree. It is now just half a shell of a tree, but we regret not taping it; it looked huge.” The tree isn’t mentioned in the 2002 edition. Having walked the same route looking for big trees I only found one that fitted the above description. If you like me wonder what the giant sequoias Flint writes about looks like, I’ve attached a few photos, hoping it’s not a case of mistaken identity… Has this tree been measured for volume at a later stage?

Fredrik
by F.Jakobsson
Thu Apr 18, 2013 5:10 pm
 
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Re: Dyerville Giant

JohnnyDJersey wrote:Does anyone know if a photo of this tree exists before it fell in 1991?


John,

You’ll find a photo of the still standing Dyerville Giant on page 35 in the highly recommended book Forest Giants of the World by Al Carder.

Fredrik
by F.Jakobsson
Sat Jun 01, 2013 10:54 am
 
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Re: Knot Illusions

Don Quijote’s head in profile on redwood in Stout Grove
(interpreted by Fredrik)
by F.Jakobsson
Mon Jun 03, 2013 12:45 am
 
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Re: Knot Illusions

E.T. (or bulldog) on redwood in Helen Stanford Canfield and Marian Farr Andrews Grove
(interpreted by Fredrik)
by F.Jakobsson
Mon Jun 03, 2013 6:19 pm
 
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Old 100, one of the largest snags

Old 100 (or Old One Hundred) in Giant Forest is one of the largest sequoia snags.
The tree was about 3100 years old when it died, probably in the great grove fire 150 years ago.
The 1964 inventory reported 26 feet as breast high diameter (larger than General Sherman).
Fire later reduced the snag somewhat in a controlled burning.
(Dwight Willard 1994 & 2000 and Wendell Flint 1987 & 2002)

Old 100 is off-trail near the Cattle Cabin in Giant Forest, but I’ve never seen photos of this monster remnant before, do you know of a photo before the controlled burning?

Fredrik
by F.Jakobsson
Mon Sep 30, 2013 5:55 pm
 
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Re: The sequoia with the greatest ground perimeter - 155 fee

I recently revisited this remarkable tree. This time I climbed down to see what the base looks like from below.
Lobster claws and Popeye’s forearms came into my mind…
Fredrik
by F.Jakobsson
Thu Oct 17, 2013 5:53 pm
 
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Re: The Floyd Otter Sequoia, third largest?? Never heard of

Michael, hope you had the chance to go to Garfield Grove.
If so, I’d love to learn what volume you got for the Floyd Otter Tree…

/Fredrik

A hike to upper Garfield Grove is highly recommended for fans of giant sequoia and you’ll get good exercise at the same time!
Below, some photos from our visit in September 2013:
by F.Jakobsson
Fri Jan 31, 2014 11:38 am
 
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Re: Largest redwood in pre-history

Mark Collins wrote:It's fascinating seeing many of the stumps in green, grassy fields. It really makes one wonder what the heck we are as a species and culture!


A right on the nose description of the views I saw along Fieldbrook Road in June 2011...

Fredrik
by F.Jakobsson
Sun Feb 09, 2014 7:59 pm
 
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Re: Untranslatable Words

Having grown up with Allemansrätten, the signs NO TRESPASSING, POSTED and KEEP OUT (seen in California) made and make a very hostile impression on me.
Would any of you ever consider entering a property having any of the above signs?
Let’s say you needed to ask for directions, or something similar.
Fredrik
by F.Jakobsson
Wed Apr 30, 2014 5:37 pm
 
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Re: The Floyd Otter Sequoia, third largest?? Never heard of

Hi,

I live in Sweden but the love for redwoods and sequoias has taken me to California a couple of times. These incredible trees pull like magnets! This is my first post.

Below are citations from the two editions of Wendell Flint’s book To Find the Biggest Tree where I believe he writes about the Floyd Otter Tree since it’s located nearby and upslope from the King Arthur Tree. Square brackets and italics are mine.

To Find the Biggest Tree (1987), page 70:
“A letter to Harry C. Parker (1949) from Howard Stagner mentions a large tree in the Garfield Grove. This may be the large tree [King Arthur] I report in Chapter 3 on the large trees to be found in Sequoia National Park outside Giant Forest. It is also possible that it is another nearby tree with a large base .”

To Find the Biggest Tree’ (2002), page 58:
“The tree [King Arthur] is found by walking the main trail about halfway through the grove to where a small stream cuts across the trail, and the trail itself changes direction and goes to the northeast corner of the grove. From the trail walk uphill, paralleling the small stream just to its west. The tree is close to this watershed. Two large trees stand above it .”

To Find the Biggest Tree’ (2002), page 63:
“ There is one [park inventoried tree at least 20 feet in diameter breast high] in the Garfield Grove that I have seen from a distance that may be interesting .”

Dwight Willard in his self-published book Giant Sequoia Groves of the Sierra Nevada (1994) writes on page 201 under the heading NOTED SEQUOIAS: Garfield section:
“ An unnamed 25 ft. diameter specimen is just upslope from the King Arthur Tree (W. Flint 1993 p[ersonal]c[ommunication])”

In the 2002 edition of To Find the Biggest Tree, pages 58 & 60, Flint writes about measuring the King Arthur Tree:
“It is a tiring hike [to the Garfield area] if you want to look round and get back to the campground in one day, but it can be done. […] By 1977, the Garfield area had been inventoried, and several large trees were shown on the inventory map. In the fall of 1978, two fellow tree hunters, Bob Walker and Gus Boik, went with me to look for these trees. I spotted the largest one I could see [King Arthur Tree] and called Bob over to help me make a few measurements. Later my cousin Robert Bergen and I made a few more measurements. However, it was not until 1985 that we were finally able to make some transit measurements. Mike Law and I gathered most of the data, with Jerry helping out. The other members of the party were too pooped to do anything. I had to depend on poor instrumentation for one line and we needed two transit lines to really nail this tree down, but time ran out. As it was, three of us got back to the campground after dark.”

The tiresome hike and the time pressure to measure and get out before dark may have made it necessary to prioritise which tree to measure and the King Arthur Tree seemed to Flint to be bigger than the Floyd Otter Tree.

I will try to pay the King Arthur and Floyd Otter Trees a visit in autumn 2013. A planned trip in 2012 had to be postponed.

Fredrik
by F.Jakobsson
Sat Jan 19, 2013 11:10 am
 
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Re: new dbh champ for SESE (and other records)

Mario,
for a few photos of the base/roots of the Waterfall Tree, see: viewtopic.php?f=69&t=5138
Hope they help to form an opinion.
Fredrik
by F.Jakobsson
Wed May 27, 2015 1:31 pm
 
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Giant sequoia crowns and trunks

I went to Sierra Nevada in September and hiked cross-country to giant sequoias whose crowns looked large on Google Earth hoping to find similarly large trunks underneath.

The steep and brushy terrain was effective in making pace slow so I had to leave many possibly big ones to the imagination and a future trip.

One trunk in Freeman Creek Grove that looked very promising turned out to be sequoias fused together at the base and separated higher up creating wide foliage.

This was actually the case with most of the large crowns I navigated to, so from a tree measuring point of view really nothing new or spectacular to report other than the moral that what looks like one large crown on Google Earth may be crowns in close proximity from two trees or more.

The giant sequoia groves themselves are of course always spectacular and I miss them every day.

Attached are photos of the large trunk mentioned above that seemed single from certain angles, a “decent-sized” fallen sequoia in Starvation Creek Grove, and a sequoia in Long Meadow Grove which reminds me of the likewise big-limbed Grizzly Giant in Mariposa Grove.

Fredrik
by F.Jakobsson
Tue Mar 08, 2016 7:28 pm
 
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Re: Coast Redwood vs Giant Sequoia

...The Redwoods hide much of their volume in places the Sequoia can not reach, places you can't easily see from the ground. The largest Sequoias know no taper. They almost seem to get larger as they rise, as strange as it sounds...Most of the Sequoias hold all this volume while being between 230' and 260' tall as opposed to the Redwoods 300'-350'. That makes them look extremely large, WTF large. A similar phenomenon is why my favorite redwood, the Arco Giant looks so large, 265' tall with a great bole.

John,

Arco Giant's counterpart in Sierra Nevada would be Franklin. At 224 ft the shortest of the 25 largest giant sequoias, but a 40,000+ cu ft trunk makes it one of the 10 largest. The impact upon seeing this tree may result in an exclaim of your aforementioned three-letter acronym, a photo in Flint speaks more than words. This uncelebrated tree is not marked on the Park's Giant Forest Trail Map, but a halved president is looming through the leaves...

Fredrik
by F.Jakobsson
Tue Jul 05, 2016 5:04 am
 
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The tale of the tallest common juniper

Four years ago NTS member KoutaR asked me if I knew the exact location of the common juniper said to be 18.5 m (60.7 ft) tall and growing at Lake Glypen. The claimed height would make it tallest in the world and Kouta wanted to measure it.

A record conifer in Sweden?! I was intrigued and started searching the Internet for a more exact location trying all kinds of Swedish keywords, but all websites just repeated the general location and height. I then contacted the person in charge of ‘park and nature’ in the municipality where the juniper was located who in turn asked around among colleagues. I learned that there had been a local inventory of trees especially worthy of protection in 2009, but juniper wasn't what they primarily were looking for and height was of no interest in the inventory.
Nor did the many relevant books I looked through shed any light over the matter.

Having put the Glypen juniper temporarily on hold I began noticing tall junipers myself, having neglected this aspect of junipers earlier. The mysterious Glypen juniper continued however to haunt me and a few days ago I realized that a planned trip would make it possible to visit Glypen (2.5 h drive southwest of Stockholm) and go looking for the juniper. This led me to once again try a few Internet searches and this time one of them actually paid off:

I found a pdf containing local newspaper clippings; diverse articles written between 1972 and 1982 by editor Christer Berg. A few years ago he had donated his clippings and thanks to their recent digitization the fate of the Glypen juniper was finally rediscovered. Here's a translated summary of the relevant article published January 12, 1981 which also proved to be the original source:

SWEDEN'S LONGEST (?) JUNIPER HAS FALLEN
One of Sweden's longest junipers, perhaps the longest of all has fallen, probably because of autumn storms and a partially rotten trunk. The record juniper measures 18.5 m from top to bottom and has a circumference of 120 cm. Lars Nygren noticed it for the first time in 1964 while building a cottage not far away. At first he thought it was somekind of strange Norway spruce mutation since it was as tall as the surrounding spruces. He was greatly surprised to find it was a common juniper on closer inspection. He often thought about measuring it, but it wasn't until recently that he went out to do it. Unfortunately the Glypen juniper had crashed, but it made measuring easier. Lars has sent the measurements to Björn von Rosen who studies conifers. Björn wanted to know the age so Lars will count the annual rings the upcoming spring.
- - -
An accompanying photo shows the fallen Glypen juniper and its discoverer Lars Nygren; ca 4 m of the lower part of the trunk is outside of the photo.
Glypen juniper 18.5 meter tall.png
To conclude: in 1981 the fate of the Glypen juniper is reported in the local newspaper when the juniper recently had blown over, probably in autumn storms of 1980. But for some strange reason it was treated onwards in all other sources as a still standing record juniper, never written about in past tense.

I will now let the Glypen juniper rest, just as the juniper itself has been resting on the ground for the last 37 years...

// Fredrik

P.S.

I also encountered a pdf from Swedish Society for Nature Conservation mentioning another tall common juniper at Röshult in Värnamo (4 h drive southwest of Stockholm). 18 m (60 ft) tall and locally known as Kungen (the King) it was blown over in the extreme storm of 2005. The text then informs the reader of a juniper 0.5 m taller than the King at Lake Glypen, unaware that it too had been blown over, much earlier...
King juniper 18 meter tall..png
So, the question still remains: where does the tallest living common juniper grow at this moment?

Well, maybe in Finland; see Kouta's report:
http://ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=396&t=3272
by F.Jakobsson
Wed Jul 26, 2017 5:07 pm
 
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