Search found 25 matches

Return

Drone Explores & Measures Trees In A Very Remote Forest

I recently explored the remote redwood forest of by UAV. No tree over 350' were found there but the area was completely unexplored so it was a new frontier and it needed to be surveyed. It would take 3 full days to just reach the upper part of this basin on foot. Now I can explore it in 30 minutes.

The attached represents the Mission Planner Software I use to program the drone to access a remote, unexplored redwood forest. The flight path in 3D overlay on Google Earth and Terrain maps + front mounted GoPro pictures. The mission must be carefully planned otherwise the drone will crash.

This mission had the UAV flying 400 feet over the surface features. After locating all the tallest tops on HD video I later returned with a point cloud mapping drone/UAV for targeted height measurement. This UAV/drone uses a downward pointed digital camera in photo burst mode. The triggering is accomplished through the AutoPilot software at each waypoint arrival.

Michael Taylor

WNTS VP
http://www.landmarktrees.net
California Big Trees Coordinator droneinside.jpg bridge creek mission4.jpg bridge creek mission3.jpg bridge creek mission2.jpg bridge creek mission1.jpg bc4.jpg
by M.W.Taylor
Fri Jul 19, 2013 1:21 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Mission to Bridge Creek

Hey Bob, I greatly appreciate your comments. Thanks !

I have been getting some inquiries lately. But those companies just don't know me. To date I've been secretive about my gadget building.

Michael,

Your accomplishments leave us speechless. You are so far ahead that companies that work in this area nuts not to grab you.

Bob
by M.W.Taylor
Fri Jul 19, 2013 1:41 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

259' - New California Height Champion For Ponderosa

Yesterday, while hiking through some prime forest along Eagle Creek (Shasta-Trinity National Forest), I encountered a towering ponderosa. It was tapping a spring on a 30 degree hillside. I left my Trupulse laser in my backpack the entire day until this point as I as I saw nothing but scrappy trees. But then I dropped into this shady glen and the trees became exceptional.

This is one of many extremely tall ponderosa pine that grow in the intermediate ranges, which is the mountain range between the Coast Ranges and the Sierra Nevada or Southern Cascade Range in extreme Northern California and Oregon. The intermediate ranges of northern California have large areas of prime forest in the 4000-5000 foot elevation band with deep top soil. Unfortunately this region was more heavily logged than the Sierra Ranges. Nevertheless, exceptional specimens remain well hidden in a few isolated pockets here and there. That tallest ponderosa known, 268.3' also grows in the intermediate ranges which extend into Southern Oregon.

This tree has a dead top and was likely pushing 270' at one time.

Statistics for tall ponderosa pine:

Height: 259 ft
cbh: 16 ft


Michael Taylor
WNTS VP
http://www.landmarktrees.net
by M.W.Taylor
Thu Jun 19, 2014 12:09 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: New dbh champ for SESE

I support your decision; it's clearly something to be decided by the discoverer on a case-by-case basis. Again, pros and cons.
by Erik Danielsen
Mon Jul 14, 2014 5:16 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Tallest Northern California Eucalyptus

A week ago, Luke Hickman, my friend, and I discovered a grove of Eucalyptus globulus in Contra Costa County that are significantly tall! They are competing with redwoods and are actually taller than the redwoods they are competing with. There are 4 trees taller than 240', the two tallest being 243', one with a substantial lean. The tallest hardwood in the northern and western hemispheres that I'm aware of is a 246' Eucalyptus on Santa Cruz Island. In a few years, these Eucalyptus will likely become records for the hemispheres, as they are in a perfect area to continue growing taller. These are now the Eucalyptus and hardwood (non native) height records for Northern California.
by yofoghorn
Mon Jun 09, 2014 2:31 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Gigantic Ponderosa Discovered In Mokelumne Wilderness

I just returned from the Mokelumne Wilderness in search of extreme trees. My exploring partner was the intrepid John Montague. About 10 miles from the nearest road or campsite we found this giant of a ponderosa. It has the largest lower trunk by far of any known ponderosa. It appears the white sand granite topsoil is an ideal environment for big pondys. I took trunk measurements using the vortex scope and TruPulse 360. I calculated the total volume at almost 5,000 cubic feet, making it the 4th largest known ponderosa by volume. It also has the largest breast height diameter of any pacific ponderosa (Pinus ponderosa benthamiana) at 8.7'. At 11' above the ground the trunk is still 8.1' thick. At 62' above ground the trunk is 7.6' thick ! Can anybody tell me a bigger ponderosa trunk this far above the ground ? Total height is only 176 feet so the tree is a bit on the squat side for the species. I attribute this to adiabatic wind that is almost constantly present here, making the area colder and breezier. Site elevation is 5,400 feet.
by M.W.Taylor
Sat Aug 02, 2014 5:19 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

The Enchanted Forest - Surveyed For The First Time

I finally got the opportunity to hike into the mythical Enchanted Forest of the Mokelumne River Headwaters. My exploring partner was John Montague. I first heard about the Enchanted Forest from the Tahoe to Whitney blog. See.......

http://tahoetowhitney.com/TY-Carson_Pass_to_Ebbetts%20Pass/Camp_Irene_North_Mokelumne_River.html
http://tahoetowhitney.org/content/sugar-pine-north-fork-mokelumne-el-dorado-national-forest-tahoe-yosemite-trail

The blogger described this forest as having huge sugar and yellow pines with a nice gallery of pictures to prove it. This remote place has been on my mind for 3 years now and I tried to get there before unsuccessfully, thwarted by roads only a monster trunk could use. The remoteness and inaccessibility of the Enchanted Forest is what initially inspired me to build UAVs for remote forest exploration and measurement. The hike to get there is quite brutal. You start at nearly 9,000 feet and descend Summit City Creek for almost 11 miles and 3,500 feet of elevation drop into the bottom of the gorge of Mokelumne River headwaters. At about the 5 mile point the trail begins to disappear. and becomes a steep boulder field. You then need to boulder hop and plow through the manzanita for the next 4 miles. Only remnants of the trail remain so we used the rock piles as our guide. It was obvious that very few people have been down here in the last few years.

Prior to exploring the Enchanted Forest on foot with John, I launched a pre-programmed UAV from Mt. Reba into the Enchanted Forest. The 3lbs electric wing UAV had no problem reaching and mapping the Enchanted Forest autonomously. Total flight time was about 35 minutes with distance traveled about 20 miles. I created a dense point cloud of the Enchanted Forest using the photographs from the UAV targeted over the juiciest looking part of Enchanted Forest. as seen from Google Earth From this point cloud I created a KMZ overlay for Google Earth and the Garmin GPS. We had full knowledge of the tallest trees in the forest prior to entering. We simply used our GPS to navigate to the tallest with no searching necessary. The color banded height ramp and be loaded into my Garmin Oregon450 GPS and view as an overlay on existing maps. The height of the entire forest canopy is viewable in real time as you walk through the forest with GPS map loaded and overlayed. Height coding is as follows: yellow = 50 meters, orange = 60 meters, red = 70 meters. warning. The Google Earth maps for Enchanted Forest after 6/26/2012 are wrong. They are shifted by 1000 feet from actual terrain features. To properly view these files you need to view the Google Earth maps from 6/26/2012 or earlier. CLick the time line button to change map date to earlier version.
by M.W.Taylor
Sat Aug 02, 2014 7:47 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Gigantic Ponderosa Discovered In Mokelumne Wilderness

John- Thanks for sharing such a fantastic description of you and Michaels adventure!!!
by Larry Tucei
Sun Aug 03, 2014 8:01 am
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Most Powerful Forestry Laser Ever ! (Built From OEM Parts)

Awhile back I met up with Steve Colburn of Laser Technologies Inc. to talk about new equipment ideas. He loaned me one of their new laser sensors, the S200 OEM to play around with and see what I could do with it. The S200 OEM has no exterior casing or buttons. It is just the module and open wire harness for incorporating into other projects. By itself it is rather fragile and vulnerable.

Using the best OEM parts (S200 for instance) I've put together a working multi-feature prototype forestry laser with tablet interface. See attached pictures. It is indeed ugly but it feels comfortable to hold and is very stable with the extra 8" tablet interface attached.

Features:

8" Tablet HMI
flexible MS Excel interface communication software
Remote, wireless operation. Full control over all instrument modes and features. Request data from other components etc. by MavLink protocol.
LiDAR scanning like ability with point to point 3-D mapping at 10hz.

Almost all non-ferrous construction for excellent digital compass stability, accuracy and repeatability. Three conductive points on outside exterior casing discharge possible static electricity inside box that might damage components.

High Accuracy:
accurate to 4cm or better at up 1 mile to non reflective targets such as trees
inclinometer .01 degree pitch, .01 degree roll and .01 degree yaw (+.-) 1% accurate on all 3 axis

Programmable Filter Mode for hitting reflector in cluttered forest.

Long Range - up to 9,800 feet reflective targets such a smooth white wall etc.

Tilt compensation: Can measure tree height from any position or angle

Mechanically linked Laser Module, Accelerometer and Scope to a rigid back-pane prevent movement and recalibration

2" scope offset is corrected with internal pivot adjustment formula for seem-less correction of scope angle offset.

Low power blue-tooth communication of instruments to and from tablet computer

Preloaded Computer Routines:
Three Verticals (formerly Triangle Method)
Parallax Method
Pivot Adjustment
Quad Tet-Mesh Volumizer To Calculate Volume Of Point Cloud Structures (Like Tree Trunk)
MapSmart-like software For Excel For Automated Point cloud acquisition with mouse controlled labeling, re-centering axis, rotation
Automated Point Cloud Alignment to registered colored markers

Rapid Scan. Default is 10 hz but can be programmed to measure at 14hz...14 measurements per second !!!

Higher frequency laser hits moving objects and water unlike other lasers. This is good for tops blowing in wind. Laser locks on !

10 hour battery life on Tablet and 12v Lithium

Automatic GPS based magnetic north declination correct and magnetic field offset software correction
Ublox lea-6H.....super sensitive under canopy. 2.5 meter accuracy

GPS link to real time open source maps and google earth images overlayed on tablet HMI

3DR radio option for 1 mile remote control range

highly accurate built in barometer, temperature, voltage, current and GPS.

This are some of the many features programmed into this unit. You can do all the calculations on the spot. No need to transfer data to another computer for mapping etc.



Not yet included but working on:

A good, sturdy tripod mount with axis of rotation centered around accelerometer.

A sturdy, waterproof aluminum enclosure for the parts and HMI.

Read out display for operation without 8" tablet which weighs 1 lb. The tablet is much nicer to use though. You get all kinds of great features you just can't get in a tiny LED display or MCU software.

Servo Drive Control of laser tilt and yaw from Tablet.
Touch Screen selection of tree top and auto-servo feedback loop to move crosshair to finger selected target on tablet live video feed
auto-prism pole tracking. This will make it possible to use survey rod and computer by one person at same time.

4 or 5 of Bob Leverett's Survey Formulas, built into to the laser program. (hope that is okay with him)

WiFi video feed of scope and crosshair to tablet HMI for ergonomic triggering and tree top acquisition.

Many thanks to the brilliant people of Laser Technologies Inc. for making the S200. This is amongst the most powerful, accurate and smallest laser modules in the world. When used with other projects you can do amazing things with it !

The S200 is not cheap, but very reasonably priced considering what it does. I have not been able to find anything on the market even close to it for the price.

Michael Taylor

WNTS VP
http://www.landmarktrees.net
by M.W.Taylor
Fri Sep 26, 2014 4:00 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

How To Calibrate Your Forestry Laser Using A Level Pond

The other day while measuring trees tops with John Montague we noticed a difference in our Impulse200LR inclinometer readings. john's instrument was consistently giving angles about .25 degrees lower than mine. This would indicate at least one of our instruments was out of calibration i.e what the instrument thinks is zero degrees is offset by a constant angle. This can happen after the instrument is jarred or dropped.

We needed to figure out what was going on so we headed to Fern Lake a few days later for calibration. Fern Lake is a more of a pond these days. It is nestled deep in the redwoods above Humboldt State University, my alma mater.

If your Impulse200LR or other forestry laser is out of calibration, you should never adjust the scope unless you know for sure that was what was moved out of alignment with the laser. The scope crosshairs should always be focused to infinity i.e. parallel to the laser, despite the offset. You do not sight in the Impulse200LR scope as you would a riffle scope, which is calibrated to converge with the bullet on a parabolic path. And set at a fixed distance, such as 50m. To change the scope needlessly would cause it to no longer point towards the direction of the laser travel, making locking on specific targets difficult or impossible.

Before adjusting anything, you can verify whether or not your instrument inclinometer is out of calibration and also by how much. Also verify the laser is hitting distant tree tops and is centered. If not centered then the scope is out and needs to be adjusted back to pointing parallel with the laser.

Method: Level off a prism pole at the edge of a glassy pond (no wind) in two locations with pole point just touching the surface of the water and leaving a dimple but not actually protruding into the water. You can use two prism poles or just one pole. If using two poles make sure they are of exact equal length to the nearest mm. After placing prism pole in tripod at pond edge raise measurement stick until level, or approximately level your forestry laser crosshair, which would be reading at 0 degrees to the top of the prism pole. This will require a single person to travel back and forth to adjust so using two people is the easiest and fastest way to do this. Record SD and angle to top of pole. Place same prism pole, or another of exact length at the far edge of the pond. But not so far away that you can't see the top of the prism pole in the magnified scope crossairs. Usually between 100 and 150 feet further away from pole's first position will suffice. Keep the two pole stations approximately inline. Verify after panning instrument to pole station 2 that the inclinometer still reads zero which would indicate your pan axis is level. This axis must be level to perform the calibration.

Now at this point, the crosshair of the instrument will also be lined up with the top of the pole at station#2. If not, then your instrument is out of calibration. See the attachment for procedure to find this offset.
by M.W.Taylor
Fri Oct 03, 2014 4:27 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Redwood Bushwhacking with Montague

Just finished a 1st bushwhack with John Montague, in the Coast Redwoods, yesterday. It felt epic.

My trip started in Grants Pass with portraiture, then transitioned to Coast Redwoods, all the way from Oregon's Coast Redwood trail, to Humboldt County.

We found a rather interesting redwood with incredible burls.

One redwood in a photo is actually another redwood already found a few years ago.

Some rain finally arrived. Think they got about 6/10 inch rain in a couple days.
by mdvaden
Sat Sep 20, 2014 9:03 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: new dbh champ for SESE (and other records)

Great find. Even though it seems the tree has quite a bit of taper based on the measurements, a volume of 28,000 is huge. Maybe top 30 for Coast Redwood? Not far from the large ground perimeter known...maybe 3 feet shy?
by John Harvey
Tue May 26, 2015 6:45 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: new dbh champ for SESE (and other records)

Mario

Congratulations to you and the others. Truly exciting discovery. Who would have imagined. So much more out there for those willing to hunt for the trees in wickedly difficukt terrain.

Bob
by dbhguru
Tue May 26, 2015 7:14 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: new dbh champ for SESE (and other records)

Hey John ..

The 30 footer hasn't been much mythical to me. I'm just waiting for you to find it ... LOL When you think about the number of new titans and diameter records in the past year or two, it leaves a solid possibility of 30 ft. dbh. For me, the ultimate find won't be the 30 ft. dbh coast redwoods, as much as the one that beats General Sherman's trunk volume.

Yee - hah !!

My shoulder pain vanished so I'm in shape for heavy bushwhacking. Although I think with the gallery hanging for artist of the month in June, I may lay low on exploring my next two visits.

I'm headed down this weekend and have portrait appointments on June 1st and late May 30th near Eureka. But if you are free one other day, I wouldn't mind checking out the new beast. No rush though ... I will be back the tail end of June, and could be up for a couple days bushwhacking by then.
by mdvaden
Tue May 26, 2015 7:04 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: New dbh champ for SESE

Lots of good points made here on this thread. I've been asking myself often lately whether or not posting photos and write ups is worth it. It's not an easy decision to make, especially when the inner muse desires to capture the perfect photo, find the most majestic patch of forest, or write the perfect sentence. On one hand, certain photos I have seen online have inspired me to go out in the forest, and when that happens, more discoveries are made. On the other, there is the knowledge that every picture or online post takes a chance. I've had to go back and delete many photos and posts I've made public, and have a lot more work to do in that regard, and it's my personal goal to become more disciplined. As Don mentioned, it is a "knife edged kind of thing."

I have to laugh when I first started looking around the redwood forest. I used to bring orange plastic marking tape to prevent myself from getting lost. Some of the groves I used it in would be embarrassing to admit now. Unfortunately, I worry that's how it goes with this forest. When just starting, the forest can feel infinite, posting a write up or photos of certain areas or trees may not seem like a big deal because in my mind at least, I would think "No one is going to ever step foot in this spot again!" I still get that sensation from time to time. However, the more time one spends in what remains of the redwood forest, you realize just how small and fragile it can seem, and more people will eventually step foot in that same spot.

Anyhow, thanks for the discussion here, seems like an important conversation to continue to have...
by Mark Collins
Sat Feb 28, 2015 3:15 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: new dbh champ for SESE (and other records)

John,

My computer crashed half way through reading your post the first time, guess it couldn't handle Jupiter's numbers! Congrats once again, I love hearing about these new discoveries! Looks like 2015 will be another banner year...
by Mark Collins
Wed May 27, 2015 1:05 am
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: new dbh champ for SESE (and other records)

John ... (or anybody) RE ground footprint and axis, etc., have you checked out the Giant Sequoia listed on Wikipedia's article in the superlatives category, called the ...

Waterfall Tree ???

It's stated as like 69 feet base diameter on a very steep slope. I have not looked for a photo of it yet, but am curious if whoever measured it, included what some of us may consider the transition point of the trunk that are the beginning of the roots. Or is it all undisputably trunk?
by mdvaden
Wed May 27, 2015 11:25 am
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: new dbh champ for SESE (and other records)

Mario,
for a few photos of the base/roots of the Waterfall Tree, see: viewtopic.php?f=69&t=5138
Hope they help to form an opinion.
Fredrik
by F.Jakobsson
Wed May 27, 2015 1:31 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: new dbh champ for SESE (and other records)

Mario,

I'm planning on going to the Sierras in about a month from now. At this point, I want to check out the Waterfall Tree. Wendell Flint makes it sound like undisputed trunk, but I want to see the tree for myself and see if it's a trunk or a root. There are photos of the tree here on ENTS-BBS. http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=69&t=5138

My thought is this: if the slope itself is greater than 45 degrees, then I'd definitely count it as root. Slope always enhances ground wraps. Grant is the largest tree on perfectly flat ground. Jupiter has the same ground difference (12') as the Boole Tree does as per Van Pelt's book. The Waterfall Tree obviously has HUGE ground difference. If the ground difference is greater than the horizontal distance between top and bottom (i.e. greater than 45 degrees), then I would not count it as trunk.

Also, my one other comment: the 43.3' axis is the largest HORIZONTAL axis of any single-stem tree. It's not on the slope at all. It's flat. The Grant Tree was the previous largest at 40.3'. I haven't measured the Boole Tree to know it's largest horizontal axis, but I'd like to revisit it and figure that out, at least roughly. I think it's much less as the trunk is rounded. Jupiter's trunk appears almost like a right triangle, with the right angle at the upper slope and the hypotenuse at the lower slope. Really weird trunk shape for a hill. One would expect, like with the Waterfall tree, that it's longest axis is along the slope, not perpendicular to it.
by yofoghorn
Wed May 27, 2015 1:39 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: new dbh champ for SESE (and other records)

Mario,
for a few photos of the base/roots of the Waterfall Tree, see: http://ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=69&t=5138
Hope they help to form an opinion.
Fredrik

Looking at those photos, and excluding one taken with the root to fill the foreground of the image, I think that's more root growth than trunk growth.

The tree reminds me a lot of Jabba, the Coast Redwood in Redwood National Park.

See >>> http://www.mdvaden.com/redwood_jabba.shtml


Using Jabba for an example, suppose its huge root went uphill, sideways or downhill, or suppose the slope was 5 degrees or 60 degrees ... that wouldn't really alter the fact that the huge mass of wood off to the side was more of a root-like growth in relation to ACTUAL trunk girth at ground level. The expansion was triggered more due to roots than due to trunk enlargement.

Put another way ...

If Jabba lives another 1000 years, we could come back and claim is has an insane axis and circumference once all that wood reshapes, enlarges and forms itself to the slope.

But I think the lions-share of the trunk is actually the best arbitrator, how much it tapers and flares, around most of the circumference.
by mdvaden
Wed May 27, 2015 10:50 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: new dbh champ for SESE (and other records)

Mario,

My thought is this: if the slope itself is greater than 45 degrees, then I'd definitely count it as root. Slope always enhances ground wraps. Grant is the largest tree on perfectly flat ground. Jupiter has the same ground difference (12') as the Boole Tree does as per Van Pelt's book. The Waterfall Tree obviously has HUGE ground difference. If the ground difference is greater than the horizontal distance between top and bottom (i.e. greater than 45 degrees), then I would not count it as trunk.



If we applied that rule to Tsunami the Hemlock, it would have just grown another foot or two ...
by mdvaden
Wed May 27, 2015 11:33 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: new dbh champ for SESE (and other records)

Mario,

What would be your suggestion of how to determine root from trunk that isn't subjective to interpretation? I can't think of a really definitive way to do it. Can you?
by yofoghorn
Thu May 28, 2015 12:47 am
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: new dbh champ for SESE (and other records)

Mario,

What would be your suggestion of how to determine root from trunk that isn't subjective to interpretation? I can't think of a really definitive way to do it. Can you?

Experience and time.

Its something I was thinkng a lot about this week. Nobody masters anything in less than 7 years. Maybe 10 years. I've shared to my customers and quite a few professionals among landscape and tree care over the years. Some things are easy and obvious. Like ryegrass has a midrib and unfolds, whereas bentgrass unrolls and lacks a midrib. Those are simple to spot and learn and decide. When it comes to the "judgement call" arena where someone needs to "read" what the tree has to say, or the vibes it gives off, that's where where 10 to 20 years experience or more on a daily or weekly basis may give a head start.

That's what surprised me about Steve Sillett and Michael Taylor after I met them. Not that I doubted them. But they were not experienced with trees in the mainstream path of being arborists, etc.. But I found they both have a genuine ability to read a tree, and gauge its characteristics.

For a tree like the waterfall tree, if someone took lots of better photos, I could form a good opinion. But being there is much easier.

It reminds me partly of drainage consultations I do throughout each month. It's a feel for the property and what the trees are "saying". Like one friend's yard ... he had two drainage experts say he had a high water table and needed a French drain. Eventually he called me out, and 300 ft. before I got on the property, i did not know the solution, but the old trees I saw in the distance already judged that the others were incorrect. It turned out that the lawns merely had an inch of surface compaction that needed to be removed, soil cultivated and new sod installed.

I find that the same thing happens in the forest, where individual trees are revealing a narrative.

Van Pelt's two publications about characteristics of forests seems to tie-in with this line of thinking and approach to looking at trees.
by mdvaden
Thu May 28, 2015 1:28 am
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

New 28k SEGI in Peyrone Grove

I spent a week in the Giant Sequoia forests with my friend Luke Hickman. He and I worked on a few different things, one of which was exploring Peyrone Grove. We were prompted by a photo in Dwight Willard's book of a monstrous looking giant sequoia. Peyrone Grove is very difficult to access and was partially logged. Some of it actually extends into the Tule Reservation to the west. We accessed the grove by an old logging road and transferring into the creek. I had marked a few big trees on my GPS and eventually discovered what we were looking for: a monster tree I call "Ballpoint" after the ballpoint pen we found in the ground near it. The tree, sadly, does not have a massive basal taper nor does it have an extremely tall top, but some of it's numbers are still impressive and rather large. The total height was only around 220 to a broken top with a few reiterations and live crown that were taller. The tree's bole is 28048 cubic feet!

Height (above upper ground) - Diameter
0' - 20.3'
26' - 15.1'
75' - 13.9'
150' - 12.1'

Historical Photo
image.jpeg

Rock with Peyrone Grove Overlook
IMG_1099.JPG

Ballpoint with Luke for scale
IMG_1153.JPG

The Hike Out with me for scale
IMG_1159.JPG

There is still much of the grove left to explore, including some very very large crowns in the unlogged, western parts of the grove (before the Reservation). If you decide to go, get ready for a hike! Also, access to the Reservation is not allowed without permission, so please be respectful and do not trespass should you decide to go out there. There are still 30000 cubic foot trees in the SEGI species to discover. Garfield Grove is a place to look, so is Peyrone. There may be some monsters in the more remote parts of Mountain Home Forest and the surrounding groves as well!

We also measured the Waterfall/Day/Big Base Tree in Alder Creek Grove, where I posted about it here (see most current post): http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=69&t=5138

Also, this trip yielded one of the most important trees of the species in my book. I'm working with some folks as far as how to publicize the discovery. Stay tuned! I hope to let all of you know about it within the next few weeks!
by yofoghorn
Wed Jun 24, 2015 6:59 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Tanoak Growing Conditions

Saturday, my friends and I found a new world-record tall tanoak. It is 163.8' tall, has a DBH of around 5 feet, and exists in the Little Sur River drainage. We measured it with a handheld Impulse laser and prism. The tree was somewhat an anomaly: it was way up on a hillside and not near any spring or creek. There was no visible source of water. The previous record, a 162.0' tanoak in Nisene Marks (very young), was tapping a spring and very fast growing. The next tallest is 158' in Big Basin and up on a hillside again (large, old tree). I've looked for four years (since 2011) to try and find a taller tanoak and hadn't noticed anything until now.

The entire reason for this post is this: does anyone have any ideas on where tanoaks will grow tallest? Certainly it's not in the valley bottoms, but they probably do better in springs. My guess is that there are tanoaks over 170' or more somewhere, though I haven't been able to find any. I would never have guessed to find a record in the Big Sur region. I know of a decent number of record hardwoods and they are found all around the state, and they all have access to water. So, a question is, does it make sense that the tallest tanoak could be in the Big Sur region? There must be significantly taller tanoak tree, but I have no ideas as to where it would be. Springs in the Big Sur region may be a great place to look, however.

Could the tallest native hardwood in California turn out to be a tanoak?! The tallest known trees right now are two that I found: a sycamore in Corralitos at 178.62' and a bay laurel in Hendy Woods at 177.50'. I'm curious what people think about the tanoak species in respect to these others. If a sycamore can make 178.6', maybe a tanoak can too. Steve Sillett had expressed to me that he believes tanoaks could reach 200'. I'm not sure if that's possible unless we can find prime areas. Most of the Santa Cruz Mountain tanoaks were harvested for tanneries, and a majority are very young. Big Sur, at least in the Little Sur River, does not seem to have harvested them.

Special thanks to my friends Robert Collar, Riki McDaniel, and Sebastian Alarcon for assisting me in measuring this new find.
by yofoghorn
Mon Jul 20, 2015 4:15 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic