Search found 137 matches

Return

The Man Who Planted Trees

The Man Who Planted Trees

In 1987 this Canadian production won the Academy Award for the Best Animated Short Film, and in 1994 was voted by animation artists to be one of the 50 Greatest Cartoons of all time. This English version is narrated by Christopher Plummer.

It is a fictional tale that tells the story of one shepherd's long and successful singlehanded effort to re-forest a desolate valley in the foothills of the Alps near Provence throughout the first half of the 20th century. It does however reflect the examples of several real life personages. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Man_Who_Planted_Trees


Part 1 of 3 (9:52)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1MbosrkVYPU&feature=related


Part 2 of 3 (9:57)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hhb2PlgxT-s


Part 2 of 3 (9:45)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DX67S26l2Vc&feature=related


..
by edfrank
Sun Mar 28, 2010 9:40 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest

Will, Jess, Josh & ENTS.

Yesterday I decided to return to Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest to follow up on a measurement of a really tall White Pine located on the ridge above Little Santeetlah Creek. The tree was an old scraggly pine that I measured at a whopping 176.3 feet tall back in May 2008. Arriving at Kilmer at 11:30am I ventured into the forest to find the tree. It worried me that the LiDar data that Will spoke of did not pick it up. Being new to measuring at that time I knew I could possibly be off but I felt not by that much. Arriving at the tree my heart was let down. It was dead and had lost it's top! I had noticed while measuring the tree in 08 that it had an old scraggly look with some dead limbs but I did not expect to come back and find the tree dead. I measured it to the new highest point below the crown breakage and it came out to 145.9' tall. Naturally, I was very let down. It may have been the tallest tree measured in JKMF before it's death. Dead remains of it's top and limbs surround the tree on the hillside.

I noticed that it was not alone. Hiking onward I found a number of other large White Pine dead. I wonder what is killing them? I suspect an insect but some of these trees are quite old and like people they can die of old age. The most saddning part is all the hemlocks are dead. The riverbottoms is lined with acres upon acres of dead hemlocks. Sunlight easily reaches the forest floor in what should have been shade. The only healthy hemlocks I find is the small treated ones at the parking area.

Searching off the Naked Ground trail I find a number of Great Whites but all fall short of the magic 150 mark. I also looked for a Chestnut rampic found by Ranger Dan. I did not successfully locate it. Maybe next time. I did find a really tall American Holly. 63.7 feet tall. It is the tallest I have measured outside of Congaree National Park SC.

Heading back to the car I got a drink and then headed for a quick measuring spree up in Poplar Grove. Naturally this is awesome. Those trees are so big! On my last visit I went in May after the leaves were on the trees which makes measuring difficult. Today should be easier. As a summary, most I roughed out in the 140s but a fair number reached above 150 and I gave them closer attention. I measured one giant to 161.0 feet tall! I found others that were huge thick " chunks " only 100-120 feet tall. They look like hydras with wide short trunks with tentacle-like limbs only at the very top. When photographing these trees I thought, pictures won't do these trees justice.

I would love to have had more time in this wonderful forest. Camping at the nearby Rattler Ford Campground would be a good idea. There is much to be done here and I believe that ENTS has only scratched the surface. I had to hurry too much through Poplar Grove. It is a 2 1/2 hour drive home.

Also, on this trip I used my " new " Garmin GPS. Hopefully it will help others locate trees I measure, beyond my usual location descriptions. I just gotta learn how to use it. Be patient with me.

Also, I have uploaded a couple of pictures that need an id to the plants. One is a pinkish-purple flower that resembles Bloodroot but Bloodroot is usually white with a yellow center. Another is a fern. Jess? ENTS?

On the way home I measured two Norway Spruce trees I noticed on the way. I thought, " those look really tall ". They are in a small clear-cut area near the intersection of Sugar Loaf rd and US 74. Several Norway spruce are here but I measure only two due to them being on private property with no trespassing signs. I could not enter and girth the trees either. The attached image shows the spruces as white dots with me ( A dot with an M ) within the oval ( clear-cut ) area. The image was taken before the clearcutting. One of them is 125.0 feet tall. I was estatic! I don't think the NC state record is much more than this. Maybe 128-130 and I think it is a the Biltmore Estate.

Here are the measurements

Measurements.jpg

James
by James Parton
Sun Mar 28, 2010 8:29 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: American Beech- The Movie!

Jenny, were you unable to use the map in .pdf form, or were you unable to get it at all for some reason?
Here's a link, in case.
by mdavie
Mon Mar 29, 2010 4:47 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: A nice swamp white oak---

I like to look up into the branches of open grown trees to look at their bark. Swamp white oaks generally have that nice, distinctive peeling bark that looks alot like birch bark. If the branches are too high, like in a forest, I like to use binoculars to get a close up view of the bark way up there. Acorns also work well...as the burrs on the acorn caps of bur oaks makes them easy to tell apart from swamp white oaks.
swamp white oak.jpg
bur oak.jpg
white oak.jpg

Doug
by DougBidlack
Sun Mar 28, 2010 9:37 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Historical Photos of the Southern Forests

ENTS, I was looking for old southern forest photos and came across these photos on Flickr.http://www.flickr.com/photos/41460075@N08/sets/72157622984778649/ I thought ENTS would be very interested in them. There are a lot of photos from North Carolina showing the old growth, Spurce, Poplar, White Pine, Hemlock, etc. Various southern states are shown with virgin timber. Some of you probably know some of these locations. I haven't seen many photos like these, I wanted you guys to have a look at them. The author is a group called "Southern Forests for the Future" http://www.seesouthernforests.org/ about the project: http://www.seesouthernforests.org/about/project This in turn is a project of the World Resources Institute: http://www.wri.org/

Larry
by Larry Tucei
Sat Mar 27, 2010 8:56 am
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Flowering Trees and Plants

ENTS, Some photos from last weekend of several different plants and trees in my region blooming. Spring is the most beautiful time of the year. Larry
by Larry Tucei
Sat Mar 20, 2010 9:59 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

White Pine portrait

This is an eastern Massachusetts white pine that I visited recently. It's not particularly outstanding in height or CBH but it is a gem in its piece of woods.

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4037/4465650727_5e79822b54_b.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2752/4465653019_b86e876e0b_b.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2726/4465661239_b356ff7acc_b.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2796/4465658465_95562d05b8_b.jpg

The entire photo set

Andrew Joslin
Jamaica Plain, MA
by AndrewJoslin
Tue Mar 30, 2010 8:31 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Photo Panorama of Boogerman Trail

Here's a panorama I stitched together from a summer hike the first time I went to find (unsuccessfully) the Sag Branch poplar:

Image
by jamesrobertsmith
Wed Mar 31, 2010 3:29 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Frank Waters and the Maya

My brother, John Nizalowski, teaches creative writing at Mesa State College in Grand Junction, CO. Although he hails from upstate New York, as I do, he has become immersed in the culture of his new locale to such a degree that he has been given the nod to be the official biographer for Frank Waters, a writer of 25 some books that represent much of the culture and civilization of the American Southwest. Waters was nominated five times for the Nobel Prize in literature. To read about my brother John's transition from a denizen of upstate New York to a desert dweller, pick up his multi-genre book Hooking the Sun from Farolito Press.
I have been working my way through Waters’ last major piece of writing entitled Of Time and Change [a memoir]. One chapter recounts a visit that Waters had to the Mexican state of Chiapas to visit the Lacandones, the last surviving full-blooded descendents of the Mayas. His host was Gertrude “Trudi” Blom, widow of archeologist Franz Blom. The Bloms had come to Chiapas in 1950 to study the Mayan ruins and the Lacandones and started providing living quarters for other anthropologists and archeologists engaged in similar activity.
Waters came for a visit around 1970 and one of the most rewarding experiences of the trip was spending time with Old Chan K’in of Naha, an eighty year old religious leader of the northern Lacandones. I want to quote several paragraphs I feel distill the philosophy of the ancient Maya and the fears that Chan had for the future of his culture:
“The stories he told as he lay in his hammock and smoked cigars were earthy and often humorous. Most of them were of the creation of the world by the gods as well as the interdependence of men, animals, trees, stones, and stars. He was not reluctant to tell these stories to us outsiders, nor was he self-conscious about his easy, intimate relationship with all living things in heaven and earth.
“One of his stories struck me as being especially significant. Whenever a tree is felled, a star falls from the sky. Hence, a Lacandon before chopping down a great mahogany asks permission of the forest and of the stars above. So too do the pueblo Indians back home in the Southwest ceremonially ask the great pine they are about to cut for permission to sacrifice it.
“The Lacandon belief explained Old Chan K’in’s fear of the growing interest of Mexican officials in the mahogany trees of the Lacandon rain forest. Accompanying this threat were Lacanda’s abandonment of traditional beliefs and adoption of Christianity, the steady influx of modern gadgets and cheap whiskey, and increasing numbers of visitors like ourselves”. [p. 239]
Gertrude Blom (1901-1993) was quite an interesting individual in her own right. She spent five decades documenting Mayan culture and was a “pioneering environmental activist”. Her home has been preserved as a cultural and resource center “devoted to the protection and preservation of the Lacandon Maya and the La Salva Lacondona rain forest.”
Her Wikipedia entry has this to say about this senior citizen activist: “The systematic deforestation of La Selva Lacandona by loggers, immigrant settlers, and the Mexican government changed the direction of her life yet again. In the 1970s, Blom decided she must speak out, and thus became one of the first environmental activists. She traveled the world, lecturing from first-hand experience about the death of the jungle and showing slide shows of her documentary photographs. In three languages, she wrote hundreds of articles protesting Mexican policies. In 1975 she started El Vivero, a tree nursery that still distributes free trees for reforestation. Blom said, ‘I am hopeless, but I plant trees.’ Here is another quote worth repeating: “If mankind continues abusing the planet as we are today, the effects in the near future will be far worse than the devastation that would be caused by any atomic bomb”
Here is another interesting point: her academic training was actually in horticulture. I couldn’t help but think that the travails of the Lacandones have parallels with the themes in the movie Avatar.

Ed Nizalowski
Newark Valley, NY
by edniz
Wed Mar 31, 2010 8:44 am
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Cannabis in our National Forests

ENTS,

Check out this link on pot growers in our National Forests. Have any of you ever stumbled on a pot operation and lived to tell about it?

http://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v00/n286/a02.html

Years ago, while fishing the French Broad Rivers west fork headwaters I came out of the river into a small clearing that had some of the prettiest plants in it that I ever laid eyes on. I immediatly recognized them as Cannabis, or Marijuana. Some of them were as tall as I was, maybe a little taller. The first thing I thought was of armed people and or booby traps. I saw tracks were people had been but saw nobody. I quickly stepped back into the river crossing it to the other side and walked quickly well up the river before re-entering it and started fishing again. I was wary the rest of the day but never heard or saw anyone. There were enough plants there for someone to make gobs of money. My guess was some old moonshiner had graduated to growing Cannabis. Fortunantly I saw no shotguns that day!

I fished up that river again years later. I saw no one suspicious and I never saw Cannabis there again. Dad did have some tires flattened though. I have not fished that stretch of river since the early 90s. I have gotten older and smarter and everything there is conspicuously posted " No Trespassing ". I fish down a bit lower on public land and still catch a decent catch of fish. Usually. But even public land can have pot plantations, as the link shows.

Can Cannabis grow wild or naturalize?

James
by James Parton
Fri Apr 02, 2010 11:04 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Big Tulip

ENTS,

Last Saturday before going to work I decided to take a trip to scout for turkeys as well as measure a huge tulip tree. The area is just north of the town of Chesterfield, SC.
There is also a grove of river birches on the property. I don't think we have much data on the species so I measured a couple. The largest came in at 4'9" cbh and 77.1' tall.

DSCF0039.jpg

Next it was on to the tulip tree. It grows out over a pond so I couldn't get limb spread.

cbh 16'
height 82.5'

I did measure the lowest limb with the rangefinder out to a distance of 11.5 yards.

DSCF0046.jpg

DSCF0042.jpg


Tyler
by Tyler
Sat Apr 03, 2010 11:28 am
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

The Final Chapter

ENTS


Today my friend District Manager Tim Zelazo and I met at MTSF to complete the inventorying of the 150s. I needed to remeasure the Oneida Pine to insure it hadn't lost any crown. If so, we would have 103 confirmed 150s in MTSF. It hadn't lost an inch. At 152.5 feet, it has crown to spare.

On the way to the Oneida Pine, I showed Tim Magic Maple. He liked the tree a lot. An image of Tim and Magic Maple follows.

TimAndMagicMaple.jpg


Threading our way through rock formations, we approached an area of old hemlocks. The following image is of the passage through.

PathwayDown.jpg

The next image show Tim next to a 10.1-ft around, 121.3-ft tall, 250-year old hemlock. Way cool.

OGHemlockAndTim.jpg

The final image shows a 103.9-ft tall yellow birch I measured. Not bloody bad.

YellowBirch104.jpg

Oh yes, we found another 150-ft white pine near the end of the historic 1700s Shunpike route. It becomes the Robert Campanile Pine. It is 9.3-ft around and 150.5 ft tall. That, folks, is number 104 confirmed. Mohawk rules. There are 9 trees that could grow into 150s by the end of this growing season, which would put MTSF #1 in the Northeast. Blue paint at the base of the Campanile Pine reminded us of a planned timber sale that was halted when MTSF became part of the 9th forest reserve. I felt immense satisfaction. This tree and one higher on the ridge named Lonesome Pine, also a 150, were to be part of a softwood timber sale. However, I was allowed to draw the boundaries of Reserve #9, which includes the cluster of north end pines. It would have been tragic to have lost them.

Bob
by dbhguru
Fri Apr 02, 2010 8:18 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Lake Lure & Chimney Rock

ENTS,

Last Sunday, after church I decided to take a run down to the tourist town of Chimney Rock to check out a couple of large Red Cedars I remembered seeing there. Chimney Rock is located deep in the Hickory Nut Gorge and is accessed by a single road alongside the broad river. Chimney Rock State Park is located very close by. Getting there I could not find a place to park and drove on down to Lake Lure. Parking in front of a bank across the road from Lake Lure Beach I spied some nice trees including a big triple Red Cedar and nice Sycamore. Also the entrance to Bottomless Pools is here. It is closed but I walked up to the covered bridge checking out the trees there. The creekside has a lot of Sycamore, White Pine, Tuliptree and what appears to be Eastern White Cedar. A nice larch-like tree is on the right just before reaching the covered bridge. I will cover this one in a separate upcoming post.

I also had a bit of problems id'ing a pine here. It looks generally like shortleaf but the bark is sorta intermediate between it and Pitch. It lacks the little vesicle pockmarks while a nearby Shortleaf has them. The tree is 91.2 feet tall and splits into two trunks only 5 feet above the ground. At 3.5' the girth is 8' 3 1/2". I have read that Pitch Pine and Shortleaf can naturally hybridize. True? If so I suspect this tree might be a hybrid. Due to a group picnic near the tree I did not get a photograph.

Walking back I crossed the main bridge and walked right up the old dirt road to Bottomless Pools. There I measured a nice hemlock and Tuliptree. The hemlock was green and beautiful. I noticed on other hemlocks that adelgid was present but only as occaisional cottony flecks at the base of the needles. But it is only a matter of time before the pest destroys the trees here too. That beautiful Hemlock was 120 feet tall!

Back in the bank parking lot I measured a really nice spreading American Sycamore. I have gotten used to measuring conifers like White Pine and the Sycamore was a challenge. I had to scan through the canopy to find the highest point and I still feel the tree is a bit taller than the highest place I found. 72.6 feet above ground. Measuring the spread was a chore by myself. I won't swear that it is 100 percent accurate but It should be reasonably close. Only the girth was easy on this tree. A respectable 13' 1" cbh.

Driving back up to Chimney Rock I finally found a place to park and took a short walk on the Broad River walk trail. While here I observed a willow or willow-like tree with pretty twisted branches. I will include them in with that larchlike tree on a future post. The two large Red Cedars I came to measure are located on the left side of the road coming down into Chimney Rock, just before entering " town" from higher in the gorge. A private drive is near the trees. The tallest turned out to be a nice 87.8 feet tall. The tallest I have measured to date. If my memory is right, the tallest Eastern Red Cedar measured by ENTS is around 97 feet. That is 10 feet taller than this. I think Will Blozan or Jess Riddle measured it. I am not sure. A nice American Holly is near the Cedars.

Jenny, I thought of you upon seeing the Kwansan Cherries. You have an eye for beauty.

Here are the measurements.

Measurements.jpg

James
by James Parton
Tue Apr 06, 2010 2:10 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

In the Time of Trees

In the Time of Trees

A photo essay by Time.com

Magnum Photographer Stuart Franklin has spent a decade exploring the beauty of trees and the unique place they occupy in man's world

Read more: http://www.time.com/time/photogallery/0,29307,1731606,00.html
by edfrank
Wed Apr 07, 2010 7:59 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Early Spring, Western PA

ENTS,

I went out for a short drive yesterday to catch a few images of the early spring colors. We often think of the fal foliae in terms of color, but there is color in the spring as well. Beyond the pale green of youg leaves are the bright white bursts of cherry flowers, red maple flowers, and even the red leaves of the maples as the first burst out of their buds. We still have the grays of the winter bark. The brown beech leaves still cloth the tree. The bright green of hemlock and white pine stand in contrast to the bare branches and teh first hnts of spring color. I wanted to try and capture some of these things before this passing momment of the spring season passed.

DSCN1789b.JPG

DSCN1809a.JPG

DSCN1810a.JPG

DSCN1815a.JPG

DSCN1853a.JPG

DSCN1861a.JPG

DSCN1883a.JPG

Edward Frank

..
by edfrank
Thu Apr 08, 2010 11:02 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

A Few Trees

ENTS,

Tuesday afternoon on the way to mom's from my home in Arden I stopped along Interstate 26 after passing over the French Broad River Bridge to photograph a nice grove of White Pine located on Biltmore Estate land. I have passed this grove many times and had always wanted to visit it but it having no known access and it being on private Biltmore land has forbidden it. But I got a picture and measured one pine from the car. It turned out to be 120 feet tall. Not excetional but ok. They probably are some taller ones in there.

Someone, maybe Will Blozan, mentioned in a past post about some of the Biltmore Whites not being of NC stock but a more northern strain that is not quite as tall. I wondered about this as I examined the pines.

Getting to mom's we sat out on the porch talking and enjoying the nice weather as we were admiring her Yoshino cherry that I got her as a gift about 10 years ago. She asked me if I could measure it so she could see how much it grows in upcoming years. It is a nice full tree that blooms beautifully every spring. I got mom to help me measure the spread. It is easier with two people.

I also re-measured the girth of the big single trunked Silver Maple mom has on her property. It was 15' 5" cbh. I last measured it nearly two years ago and it was 15' 2 1/2" then. Providing I measured it in exactly the same place it has grown quite well in such a short two growing seasons. I also measured a neighbors holly as well.

Later,on the way to the healing prayer service at Grace Episcopal church we stopped to measure a big Sycamore that we had noticed the week before. It is located at the edge of the left side of the parking lot at the Save-Mor store across from Grace Episcopal on Merrimon Ave. The tree was a nice 15' 4 3/4" in girth. Almost exactly the same as mom's great maple. It is 85.4 feet tall. I got nearly the same measurement shooting upward through the crown as I did stepping well back from the tree and measuring it from there.

Here are the measurements.

Tree Measurements.jpg

James
by James Parton
Fri Apr 09, 2010 9:33 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

The tallest non-eucalypts of Tasmania

ENTS,

Tasmania is well-known among the tall tree lovers for being the location of the tallest angiosperms of the world. A register of the all measured trees over 85 metres (279 ft) tall or with volume over 280 cubic metres (9890 cu ft) can be found here:

http://gianttrees.com.au/pdf/register.pdf

The species in the register are:

REG = Eucalyptus regnans
OBL = E. obliqua
GLO = E. globulus
VIM = E. viminalis
DEL = E. delegatensis

Besides these five species, at least following three species are capable to attain heights over 50 metres (164 ft):

E. dalrympleana
E. johnstonii
E. subcrenulata

There are also some non-eucalypt species which are tall in European or eastern US standards. However, reliable measurements are almost non-existent. I recently received an Excel table with some Laser based measurements and exact locations from a Forestry Tasmania person, and I thought the information would be interesting for ENTS. I asked if I may put the table to the ENTS-BBS, but I have not got an answer. Therefore, I only give here the greatest heights by species with diameters and approx. locations. The height measurements have been done with a TruePulse Laser and the sine method and the diameter measurements with a measuring tape.

Species, Height, Diameter, Location
Acacia melanoxylon , 49.9 m (164 ft), 96 cm (38''), Trowutta Forest Reserve
Nothofagus cunninghamii , 46.7 m (153 ft), 261 cm (103''), Tarkine
Athrotaxis selaginoides , 37.8 m (124 ft), 259 cm (102''), Reynold Falls Nature Recreation Area

The list is very initial and very incomplete. Essentially, a few well-known tall specimens have only been measured. Lagarostrobus franklinii would perhaps make the list, but accurate measurements are missing. It is a conifer growing particularly along western rivers. A. melanoxylon is a common early successional species. N. cunninghamii is the dominant species on areas with higher rainfall and fertile soil and without eucalypts (they are called "rainforests" in Australia; neighbouring eucalypt forests on similar soils are NOT called rainforest but "wet sclerophyllous forests" although many "rainforest species" are morphologically just as sclerophyllous as eucalypts). A. selaginoides is a conifer growing particularly at higher elevations.

- Kouta
by KoutaR
Fri Apr 09, 2010 6:52 am
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

More Sharptop

ENTS,

Here are more Sharptop Images. I call the first two Spirit Rocks.

17SpiritRocks17.jpg


15SpiritRocks15.jpg


The next shows old growth along the trail.

04OGFormsEmerge4.jpg


Bob
by dbhguru
Mon Apr 12, 2010 7:08 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Huge Wisteria or Purple Sycamore?!

ENTS,

Some of you may remember a post on a huge vine I measured in downtown Hendersonville a little over a year ago. I guessed it to be a Wisteria but I was not sure. All I know is it is the biggest vine(s) I have seen. They encircle an American Sycamore which I later measured to be just under 100 feet tall. I noticed Wisteria being in bloom around town and remembered the huge vine. As I drove through town to the appropriate spot I thought " WoW, a purple blooming sycamore " The tree is beautiful draped in hanging purple flowers almost all the way to the top. I knew right then that the id on Wisteria was correct. I'll let the pictures do the rest of the talking!

http://www.nativetreesociety.org/fieldtrips/north_carolina/20081225-hendersonville/huge_vine_in_hendersonville.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wisteria

James
by James Parton
Thu Apr 15, 2010 8:36 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

About: Scientists, Artists, and Naturalists

ENTS,

What I am trying to do with this series is to acknowledge the contributions of various people in the development of our understanding of the forest, the origins of the conservation ethic, and artistic interpretations related to the natural world. I want to encourage others to add people to this collection. There are contemporary people who deserve note. I can think of western tree climbers like Steve Sillet, and Bob Van Pelt. Bob should be mentioned just for the quality of his artwork. Roma Dial and others are exploring the tropical canopies. There are historical figure like Gifford Pinchot. Icons in the advancement of scientific knowledge of the natural world. There are pioneers in the environmental movement. There are nature photographers I admire that influence our perception of the natural world. Some of these include John Shaw and James Brandenburg. There are excellent photographers in our own membership including Miles Lowry and Tim Sullivan. There are people who were involved with the emergence of the old-growth movement in the eastern US like Mary Davis and Rob Messick. There are others around the world whose names I I still do not know.

So if anyone wants to add their own nominees for this ad hoc hall of fame, please feel free to do so. A general introductory note can be found in Wilkipedia for most famous people. Older authors may have some of their works available on http://www.archive.org You can search Youtube for video clips related to that person. Please do not include proprietary or copyrighted material beyond a conservative fair use consideration. Inappropriate entries will be deleted.

..
by edfrank
Wed Apr 14, 2010 2:30 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Bacon Woods, Vermilion River valley

ENTS-

Today I stopped at a park area I hadn't visited before, in western Lorain County, Ohio. The Vermilion River flows through the park on its way north to Lake Erie. The woods is a floodplain forest with sycamore, cottonwood, walnut, hackberry, tulip, pin oak, white & green ash, and red maple achieving canopy height, while the understory is mainly Ohio buckeye and box-elder. Big trees were rather scarce, and aesthetically the forest was not so impressive-----except for the very rich herbaceous layer that was truly luxuriant( I hit it at just the right point in the season, I think). Virginia bluebells were extremely frequent, often in colonies of 1/4 acre or larger, and sessile and nodding trilliums were very common as well: Virginia bluebells.jpg Virginia bluebells stand.jpg Sessile trillium.jpg Nodding trillium.jpg
Ostrich ferns were also abundant, with their lush fronds unfurling: Cinnamon fern.jpg

Ohio buckeye brightened the woody understory, with its fully developed foliage and pale yellow flower spikes: Ohio buckeye.jpg

As I said, big trees were rather scarce, but I did manage to find one really nice pin oak, at 122.4' tall and 14' 2'' CBH. This is a beautiful healthy tree with a thick, slow tapering bole, and a great buttressed trunk (which is quite unusual for the species as i know it). This is the largest forest grown pin oak I have encountered. Pin oak.jpg Pin oak top.jpg Pin oak trunk.jpg

Other trees measured included a sycamore at 119.1' x 12' 11'', and a white ash at 111' x 8' 10''. Sadly, most of the ash trees in the park have succumbed to EAB.

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Tue Apr 20, 2010 7:11 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Nice Red Oak

ENTS,

I came across these few pics of a nice red oak near Grand Lake on old provincial park grounds. CBH = 374 cm. It lost a branch a few years ago but still seems to be doing fine. Images were taken last fall.
by mikekowalski
Thu Apr 22, 2010 11:05 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Cataloochee Valley_Pretty Hollow Creek.

ENTS,

Last Wednesday Will Blozan e-mailed Josh Kelly and I inviting us on an outing with him into the Pretty Hollow Gap in Cataloochee Valley on the upcoming Sunday. Josh had plans and could not go but I was up to the task.

The Pretty Hollow Gap Trail begins at a gate on the right just before reaching a bridge over Pretty Hollow Creek. It is located past the main campground and first elk fields but not as far in as the last elk fields and the Caldwell house. Anyway, the lower part of the trail is a road and we were able to drive in and park a little ways up and then we grabbed our gear and water and set off. The first thing Will noticed and brought to my attention was the tall Serviceberry trees. Serviceberry always reminds me of my dad. He has always been fond of these trees, especially when in spring bloom. Many old timers call them Sarvis-trees or " Sarvis " for short. I have heard them called Asarvis and Dad always calls them Asargus. Anyway, these are the tallest I have seen. Standing under the trees roughing them out with our lasers we got heights between 70 and 90 feet on the taller ones. That's awesome. Prior to this I had never seen one over 50 feet. The white blooms could be seen high up in their crowns. Will said the tallest he knew of was over 100 feet. Awesome! I will certainly let dad know of this! I also noticed a lone old-growth tuliptree on the left near the creek on the way up. For some reason they left this one. Will seen it but did not give it much of a passing glance. He had either measured it in the past or was after other game. Only he knows.

Hiking further up the trail into the second-growth forest we started seeing really tall Northern Red Oaks, Tuliptrees and Black Cherries. Will and I both had cramped necks from checking out so many trees with our lasers. One skinny tulip made 150 feet. We also measured a Northern Red to 139.2 feet. A Black Cherry made 143.3 feet. Will is awesome on finding the highest point in complex crowned trees quickly. My measurements compared to his always averaged a foot or two low. He usually ended up finding a slightly higher point than I. The above two height measurements are his. Hopefully I wrote them down correctly. If not, I am sure he will correct me.

Naturally in the usual Will Blozan style, we headed off-trail down into the cove and crossed the creek diving into thick rhodo more than once. Will does this so naturally while I fight and struggle my way through. We checked out two once nice hemlocks in the middle of very dense rhodo on the hillside. Both had died of HWA infestation and what a shame. Both are well over 12 feet in girth. This part of the forest is above the cut-line and is old-growth.

We also checked out a nice twin-trunked Basswood tree. Will has the measurements on it. In fact Will has most of the measurements from the day. Hopefully he'll post them soon.

To be honest with you folks, I often got distracted from the trees. It is springtime and many wildflowers were in bloom on the forest floor. Various trillium, wild violets and many others whose id I did not know. I would occaisionally ask Will. What's this? What's that? He usually had an answer. With ENTS you learn to see the forest as a whole. Not just the trees. Also the variety of leaf shapes on those small plants on the forest floor is amazing. What diversity! I took a few wildflower and shrub-layer plant pictures which I will enter in an upcoming post. Yes, there is more!

On the way back down the trail Will pointed out an old chestnut snag to me. It was surprisingly tall. Naturally I examined it closely. We also checked out a couple of small European Chestnuts near the trail. I think an old homestead once was located here. Will thought they may be a mother tree around somewhere since these looked young. But we never found it. More on Chestnut to come.

We also found some really nice Witch Hazel trees. Will was quite interested in those. One that looked really aged was one of the taller ones Will knew of. He said they are probably other big ones in the vicinity. I'll have to return and see.

Returning to the truck we loaded our stuff back in and headed back up the valley to an area that Will had treated before. To show me green hemlocks and some nice chestnut relics located there. We parked at a gate blocking a forest service road which is located at an intersection. Right of the gate is the winding dirt road out of the park and left goes to Cataloochee Creek and beyond. Into Tennessee. Of course the paved road goes down into the valley. Anyway, after a five minute walk we exit the forest service road to the left and enter the woods. Now how different this immediatly looks. The hemlocks are big! Not record height but still big. But they are GREEN! Let me tell ya folks, when you get used to seeing dead grey hemlocks seeing big live ones is an eye opener. This was my favorite part of the trip. Those trees brought tears to my eyes. Will and the NPS deserves praise for this. But if only the park service would have treated more trees. It's far to few and too late for many. I hope the NPS keeps this grove up as well as the nearby Winding Stair Conservation Area. Until a viable biological control is found, if ever, the trees depend on these treatments being kept up. every 3 to 5 years or so. They are as Will put it. They are on " life support ".

Also in the forest are remnants from another past catastrophe. Old American Chestnut remains are common here. Will showed me a standing chestnut snag with the bark still on. That is something not seen very ofen anymore. Mature bark. Most old trees and logs have lost their bark years ago. One wonders why this one still has it. Also another huge log is found. One approximately 4.5 feet in diameter. Few living American Chestnut live long enough to develop mature bark. More to Come!

In short, I thank Will for inviting me. Cataloochee is awesome and I await my next visit there.

http://msrmaps.com/image.aspx?T=2&S=11&Z=17&X=766&Y=9871&W=3

Girth Measurements.jpg

James
by James Parton
Wed Apr 21, 2010 6:22 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Roadside Hawthorn

ENTS,

Last Friday I decided to re-visit an old friend who was in bloom at this time of year. It's a Hawthorn located just off the downramp from hwy 25 onto I-26 going towards Hendersonville, between Fletcher and Mountain Home. I last visited the tree back in the spring of 2005 when it was in bloom. I have noticed it bloom every spring as I pass by on my way to work or elsewhere. I stopped again to photograph it again this year. As far as the exact species I don't know. By my field guide it is the closest to Washington Hawthorn but still not an exact match. They are many species of Hawthorn and many hybridize.

I have always loved these unusual highly overlooked and often neglected trees. They have a beauty all their own.

James
by James Parton
Sun Apr 25, 2010 3:36 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Chestnut relics in Cataloochee Valley

ENTS,

During a visit to Cataloochee Valley last Sunday Will and I noted several pre-blight chestnut relics. The first was a tall rampick ( Norse for snag ), by the way Ranger Dan brought this term to ENTS when doing a post on old chestnut snags a while back. I like it and have chose to adopt the term. Anyway, Will brought it to my attention as we were making our way back down Pretty Hollow Gap trail. It was on the right between the bank and the creek. I studied it closely and measured its girth. It is the first pre-blight standing trunk I have seen. I did find one at Kilmer a little while back but was not sure if it was chestnut at the time. I now tend to think it was. I had been there looking for another that Dan had reported but I never found it. Before Will and I came across the rampick he showed me a rotting chestnut log on the forest floor. He explained to me how to tell chestnut from the other deadfall on the forest floor.

On down the trail we checked out two live chestnuts that Will knew of. They are European Chestnuts. The first I have seen. They are near the site of an old homestead and Will thought they must be a mother tree around somewhere. The two small trees are young and not much taller than 30 feet. We looked around close by but never could find a mother tree.

The European Chestnut ( Castanea Sativa ) is probably the closest relative to American Chestnut ( Castanea Dentata ). While the leaves were not out on these trees yet the leaves from the previous year litter the ground. They look very similar to Am Chestnut. The shape it pretty much the same. However the serrations at the leaves edges are not so course as the American species. Burrs also could be found under the trees. They are larger and more coarser spined than Am Chestnut. Also the trees are big enough that if American the bark would be starting to get more of the rougher mature form. But these had smoother bark than would the typical American at this size. Not as smooth as the juvinile Am Chestnuts but different. I'll attach some photos. I commented to Will that in Europe these get HUGE! He said he would love to go see them.

I wonder how well these European trees will handle the blight? In Europe the trees were saved by hypovirulence research and it is believed that it worked because they are fewer strains of chestnut blight in Europe than here in North America. It is true that European Chestnut is more blight resistant than American, but only slightly. I am curious on how well these trees hold up. They are doing ok so far.

After leaving Pretty Hollow Creek Will took me to see some chestnut relics located in a treated area in the upper part of the valley. It is located on the right as you come off the winding dirt road into the park. Left goes down into the valley. Park at the gate and walk up an old park service road about five minutes or so and take a left into the forest. Upon entering the forest the first thing you notice is the awesome green hemlocks. If you can tear your eyes away from them you can find many old pre-blight chestnut remains on the forest floor. One was a huge log about 4 1/2 feet in diameter. Will also took me to see a nice standing rampick that still has the bark on it! Very few snags still have bark anymore and many chestnut sprouts never get big enough to show mature bark. To me it looked alot like Locust. Or better yet, a cross between Locust, Walnut and Red Oak. Check out the attached photos.

We also found a nice Mountain Laurel here that was almost 30 feet tall. That's pretty dang big for Mountain Laurel! We also checked out a short fat " stumpy " hemlock that had considerable weather damage just before hitting a trail back to the car. Will had treated it but worried that due to a limb shortage that survival may be difficult for the tree. We can only hope.

I thank Will Blozan for inviting me on this great trip.

By the way. Happy Earth Day!

Chestnut Rampicks

6' 11" cbh

7' 11" cbh with bark!

James
by James Parton
Thu Apr 22, 2010 6:29 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic