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"The President" giant sequioa, SNP, CA

The December 2012 issue of National Geographic Magazine features as its cover story an article on "The President," a giant sequoia in Sequoia National Park California.

cover.JPG

The text of the article can be viewed online, but by doing so you will miss some the beautiful images from the print version of the article and a large scale poster of the entire tree also available in the print edition. The article is by David Quammen, and the photographs are by Micheal Nichols who did the December 2009 portraits of giant redwoods in National Geographic

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/12/sequoias/quammen-text

ngMag122012.jpg

The web version of the poster is here: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/12/sequoias/gatefold-image

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/12/sequoias/img/snow-tree-645x1708.jpg

The article describes Steve Sillett's teams effort to map the detailed branch structure of one of the world's largest trees by volume. Will Blozan was one of the team hired to do the mapping.

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by edfrank
Sun Nov 18, 2012 11:06 am
 
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Re: "The President" giant sequioa, SNP, CA

Ed,

Thanks for posting this. The five days I spent in the tree were among the hardest, coldest, but most incredible of my career. Now that the article is out I can post my images from the project.

Will
by Will Blozan
Sun Nov 18, 2012 12:22 pm
 
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Re: The great 31ft CBH Eastern Cottonwood of Halifax PA

John,

Very nice report. Thanks for posting and including photos. These big trees are impressive.

Ed
by edfrank
Wed Dec 05, 2012 12:03 am
 
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Re: The great 31ft CBH Eastern Cottonwood of Halifax PA

Wow, that's a monster. Cottonwoods are some of the biggest, fastest growing trees in NW Ohio, but I don't see them get that big.
by Rand
Tue Dec 04, 2012 10:28 pm
 
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Re: How old are these huge Beech trees?

John,

The largest forest grown American beech I've measured is 16ft CBH x 120+ft high in the Walnut Creek Gorge in Erie County, PA. That is way above & beyond what I usually call a large beech at 11ft CBH or greater, of which I've only measured a handful. Your beech is an absolute beauty, I wouldn't be surprised if it easily went over 200 years old, but like Ed says, there really isn't a good way to tell by just looking at them. I've looked at nice beech here at Cook Forest in old growth areas and would've easily said they'd go over 125, but after ring counts we had that particular one go into the 225+ year range, totally blew me away. They're just incredibly difficult to get a good guess on their age because they rarely show it in their bark.

Where did you find this tree?

Dale
by djluthringer
Tue Dec 11, 2012 8:15 am
 
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New Tallest Bay Laurel

Within two days of coming back to California after my first semester of college, I found a bay laurel in Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park that is the new world record in height for the species. The tree was in a part of the park near the third tallest bay laurel, which was found the same day. The tallest bay laurel is 169.42 feet tall. This makes it the second tallest native hardwood in the state. The tallest native hardwood in California is the 178.2 ft. California sycamore.
by yofoghorn
Wed Dec 19, 2012 11:31 pm
 
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Re: Did a metal spike kill my old growth Tulip tree?

John,

A very impressive tree. It is too bad it fell. I really don't know if the spike had anything to do with the failure of the trunk or not. Many, if not most, of the big old trees like this tend to get hollow with age. When they do fall it looks pretty much like this one spike or not. Could the spike have introduced a pathogen or encouraged decay at this point and weakened the tree? Sure. It certainly didn't help the tree, but the tree might have broken during the storm from the wind with or without the presence of the spike. I can't really tell where the failure began. The initial split could simply have propagated up and down the tree and through the area where the spike was located. It would be my guess, and it is just a guess, that the failure itself is unrelated to the spike, but that perhaps the path through this portion of the trunk was influenced by damage related to the spike. I am hoping some of our arborist members with more experience will comment. Good question and thanks for posting,

Ed
by edfrank
Fri Dec 21, 2012 4:15 am
 
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Re: Did a metal spike kill my old growth Tulip tree?

Nice big old Tulip, too bad, but my guess is that there are a few factors that contributed to this trees demise. I do notice that there are a couple of large stubs where branches were improperly pruned. This often leads to poor healing and rot which tends to help create hollow space in the tree. I also notice girdling wires wrapped around the base of the tree and I wonder if other wires not visible may be more deeply embedded in the tree from the past. Depending on how it was installed, the cable and bolt in the tree could also have contributed to the problem as Tulip trees in particular seem to be especially sensitive to injury to the cambium in my experience. I hope this is helpful.
by Bart Bouricius
Fri Dec 21, 2012 11:05 am
 
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Redwood NP, CA Big Honkin Douglas Fir Trees

At the moment, I'm typing from Crescent City at the Curly Redwood Lodge. Drove down last night, to spend a few days down here in the redwoods.

This morning, I had it in mind to try another top to bottom photo of Hyperion, but got enjoyably distracted by several huge Douglas fir trees not far from Lady Bird Johnson grove. These Douglas fir are not very tall, nor champions of sorts, but I was amazed to find trunks this big in the particular areas. In fact, I don't recall seeing any this wide since visiting 'Ol Jed a couple of years ago ... it was much wider though. But I can't remember the last time finding an 8 footer in the redwoods. Oregon yes, with Taylor and Hanuschik. But not in the redwoods. and then today, here's three 8 footers in just 2 hours: one closing-in on 9 ft..

The three I photograph and tape wrapped today were ..

1. 27 ft. circumference and 147 feet tall. 8.6 ft. diam. The big limbs are about 24 in. diam.

2. 25 ft. circum. and 175 feet tall.

3. 26 ft. circum. and 178 feet tall.

Finding these with moderate effort, leads me to believe that Redwood National Park has much more yet to be discovered.
by mdvaden
Sun Dec 30, 2012 2:05 am
 
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Re: Made greatest trees you tube video...

Loved it, I want to post it to my facebook page! Great work.
by Marcboston
Mon Oct 29, 2012 12:29 pm
 
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Re: The Floyd Otter Sequoia, third largest?? Never heard of

J-

Great story and photos- thanks for sharing. I have forwarded it to the "authorities" for their take on this tree. Indeed it is a giant, but unless our western counterparts have personally measured it- the claim means nothing.

Will
by Will Blozan
Fri Jan 18, 2013 9:50 am
 
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Re: The Floyd Otter Sequoia, third largest?? Never heard of

I came across this link and I was very interested. I thought I could rattle off the list of top 10 or 20 largest Sequoias. Ive never seen this tree listed on any website includind Wikipedia or Michael Taylors Landmarktrees.net. Has anyone ever heard of or been to this tree?

I've heard of the tree before. Either in conversation, or an email.

Don't remember if it was Michael Taylor, Zane Moore, or someone else who mentioned it. Good chance it was a man I met from Germany, who invested a visit or two, visiting some of the biggest Sequoiadendron.

Ha !!

Sure like the pic ... especially since I dug a Coast Redwood photo out of the files last night. Probably a fused-stem though.
by mdvaden
Fri Jan 18, 2013 11:54 pm
 
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Re: The Floyd Otter Sequoia, third largest?? Never heard of

-These are sobering statistics in my opinion. I had no idea to the extent of the logging of the redwoods until I moved to Northern California. It took a few months for me to understand what I was seeing. It's hard not to be discouraged when all you see are enormous stumps and "skinny" trees pretty much everywhere the redwoods grow. -Mark

You almost certainly know where this spot is.

Odds are you've been there, or by it, several times if you go through Avenue of the Giants.

Mario, usually I spend most of my time in the Rockefeller Forest when I head up to the Avenue of the Giants. I'm going to guess that your photo was taken across the road from the Visitor Center? Now I'm going to have to find that stump!

I can't get over how huge that Sequoia looks in that photo. Great find Johnny D!
by Mark Collins
Sat Jan 19, 2013 11:12 pm
 
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Tunnel Tree - a remarkable sequoia

If you’ve read about the Tunnel Tree in Wendell Flint’s book To Find the Biggest Tree (2002) and wondered what to look for I have attached a photo with the undersigned in front for comparison. The tree is, to quote Flint, “a remarkable 57 feet across its vast base” and stands in Atwell Mill Grove west of the Paradise Ridge Trail (Flint’s book has a map). I have never seen a photo of it before - hope it inspires a visit!
Fredrik
by F.Jakobsson
Sun Jan 20, 2013 4:02 pm
 
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Fused redwoods

The redwoods’ amazing ability to fuse can create remarkable results.
Along Cal Barrel Road in Prairie Creek Redwood State Park a couple of redwoods has fused together at the base creating one impressive trunk.
Higher up the trunks separate.
I have not measured the trunk, but me leaning against the backside gives an approximation of the size.
by F.Jakobsson
Thu Feb 14, 2013 10:38 am
 
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We need to do things like this!

76116_543054235715592_1494354890_n.jpg
by edfrank
Thu Jan 31, 2013 2:07 pm
 
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Re: We need to do things like this!

The first week of February 2013

feb2013-1.GIF


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by edfrank
Wed Feb 13, 2013 7:41 pm
 
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Live Oaks in Vacherie Louisiana Part 2 Oak Alley

NTS, In the last few weeks I have been involved with helping the owners of Oak Alley in Documenting their Live Oaks behind the Mansion. I have been down 3 times and finally finished up with the process. I measured a total of 31 Live Oaks that ranged from 9' CBH to 19' CBH. I gave them a listing of measurements, locations of the various Live Oaks and a estimation on the ages of the trees. Four of the trees I measured are 19' + CBH and I put them on the Live Oak Project listing. It has been a pleasure working on this project. I also measured the large Water Oak that I reported on in an earlier visit. The first photo set is of one of the Live Oaks near the Restaurant that measured CBH-17' 9", Height-52.5' and Crown Spread-115' x 114', a beautiful Oak with older growth characteristics. The second set of photos are of the large Water Oak that pointed out at 355, the Louisiana State Champion Water Oak points out at 397 if their measurements are accurate. The Water Oak measured CBH- 20' 5", Height- 82.5' and Crown Spread-97.5' x 91.5'. Larry
by Larry Tucei
Mon Feb 18, 2013 4:56 pm
 
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Re: Just about 80 feet short

I didn’t know it was possible to park right next to the General Sherman at such a relatively late date…
Great story and photo!
Fredrik
by F.Jakobsson
Thu Feb 28, 2013 4:36 pm
 
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Re: Just about 80 feet short

when I see them I think of that scene in "Honey, I Shrunk the Kids" where they were walking in an ordinary forest near their house but they were only a few inches tall
by Joe
Thu Feb 28, 2013 12:41 pm
 
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Re: 20+ CBH Oaks in Southern New Jersey

Those are some beautiful oaks, John. Thanks for sharing the pictures.
by pdbrandt
Tue Mar 05, 2013 2:57 pm
 
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Re: Sequoia Sempervirens or Sequoiadendron Giganteum

Johnny D, keep an eye out for the weather reports in the Sierra. It's been a very dry January/February in Mendocino county where I live, but a few storms are currently passing through the area at the moment. I'm not sure how the Sierra have been affected with snow this winter, but it can quickly dump several feet with the right storm. If you decide on the redwoods, hit me up if you want to. I live near Montgomery Woods and wouldn't mind joining you for a hike and can show you around...
by Mark Collins
Tue Mar 05, 2013 10:50 pm
 
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Re: Sequoia Sempervirens or Sequoiadendron Giganteum

Johnny:

I am late to this, but I have some strong advice.

First, I think you are trying to cover too much, even if you are sticking to the coast redwoods. You won't enjoy these trees, or even SEE them, if you are moving too fast from place to place. If you do the coast redwoods, do just two parks. My favorites are Prairie Creek and Humboldt, but you will hear other opinions. I think it is important to not only slow down, but plan half a day in one small spot, and in that one spot, maybe stay in one specific place for an hour and soak things in. If you want to take pictures, that can consume a lot of time. Be sure to walk around a lot, get on the trails, explore off the trails where that is easy. Give yourself time to BE in a place, and not think about where you are going next.

In Humboldt, I would recommend walking in the riverbead--the Eel River, and/or Bull Creek. Wonderful vistas! But then in April, maybe the water will be too high.

If it were summer, my first choice might be the giant sequoias in the mountains, but its a close call. You can't go wrong either place. You could plan three days in Giant Forest, being sure to do the Congress Grove walk, and Crescent Meadow. And, for that matter, a walk around Round Meadow is very nice. And a walk out onto Beetle Rock. And a short little climp up Moro Rock. And if you go up Moro rock, you should feel relaxed and comfortable enough to spend some time there.

Then on your way to Yosemite, you could go through the Grant Grove section of the park. And in Yosemite, a place you could easily spend all 5 days, be sure to see the Mariposa Grove, with the incredible Grizzly Giant tree.

BUT, BUT, BUT, snow can be a big problem. You can rent snowshoes, but you won't be able to cover very much ground that way. I did the Congress Grove walk in snowshoes ( maybe a little over two miles round trip), but other places will be inacessible. Snowshoeing requires a lot of extra energy/stamina. The road to Crescent Meadow may be closed, and I am not sure you could go up Moro Rock, etc., etc.

Of course you can call the park and ask about what is open and acessible, and get a weather forecast. But at the beginning of April, there could be 6 feet or more of snow in the groves. But, as I said, call the Park and see what they say about conditions and what is acessible.

Given the time of year, and given that both are incredible places to visit, you should strongly consider doing the redwoods as your first choice, and don't try to cover too much ground.

I tell people, that if you are moving too fast, trying to see too much, you won't see anything, and you will miss the "inner spirit" of these absolutely amazing trees. You may just come away thinking, "so what?" One way to look at your trip is--the more you see, the less you will REALLY SEE.

Take more trips other years!

--Gaines
by gnmcmartin
Wed Mar 06, 2013 9:44 pm
 
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Re: Sequoia Sempervirens or Sequoiadendron Giganteum

Pertaining to diversity of big trees, Redwood National Park has some Douglas fir up to 8 feet in diameter near places like Lady Bird Johnson grove, huge spruce, pretty big hemlocks, and fairly nice Bigleaf maples.

Actually, I'd recommend the Coast Redwoods this time of year.

Not because that's where I go often, but based on what I've been told by out of state and out of country visitors who enjoy both big trees and photography. The general consensus has been that the feel of the coast redwood forest overall, is the superior experience.

Another reason for that suggestion, is there's virtually zero risk of getting snowed on heavily in the coast redwoods. If it rains, you can always bring an umbrella or wear rain gear. If this were the warmer part of year, I'd almost say maybe flip a coin. Although, even in the warmer weather, the feedback I hear leans that coastal rules. Also, there are less visitors to the coastal redwoods. Even in summer, trails are pretty mellow. This winter for example, I hiked Redwood National Park Tall Trees Grove, and apparently I was the only hiker into there that day.

I'd never try to do both in 5 days. It would be one or the other for 2 to 5 days. And Muir Woods is no substitute for the Coast Redwoods from Humboldt Redwoods State Park, up to Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park. If you want a shot in the arm so to speak, that's where you need to see them. The biggest, the tallest, the best.

Follow my signature link , and find coast redwoods in the bottom menu. Then look for the page on the Seven Wonders of the coast redwoods, and another page on the best places to visit. I've tried to offer suggestions for people with a small time frame that's less than 5 to 7 days.

Below, is a photo taken last week when I was down there in Jedediah Smith redwoods.
by mdvaden
Wed Mar 06, 2013 10:36 pm
 
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The sequoia with the greatest ground perimeter - 155 feet

I first came across this extreme tree in To Find the Biggest Tree (1987 & 2002) where it’s unnamed.
Author Wendell Flint just calls it Big Base Tree on his Alder Creek Grove map in the later edition.
The book contains no photo of it.

Dwight Willard in A Guide to the Sequoia Groves of California (2000) calls it Day Tree.
Thoughts on whether Big Base Tree or nearby Stagg Tree may be the tree noticed by Day in 1931 can be found on pages 76 & 78 in Flint’s book (2002).

Recently I found that Archangel Ancient Tree Archive calls it Waterfall Tree.
The organization has taken samples from the tree and cloned it.
To read more and to watch a video from the climbing of and collecting from the Waterfall Tree visit ancienttreearchive.org/roots-sprout-on-waterfall-tree-clones/
Maybe someone happens to know who named it Waterfall Tree?

To find the Big Base Tree Flint suggests clambering through the brush starting at the Stagg Tree.
We did that, but an alternate less bushy route is to pass the Stagg Tree sign and walk the main trail maybe a minute longer until you actually see the Big Base Tree and an overgrown path leading to it.

Fredrik
by F.Jakobsson
Sun Mar 10, 2013 7:14 pm
 
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