Search found 166 matches

Return

You are not authorised to read this forum.
by Guest
 
Jump to topic

Re: Oddly enough, Iceland

One of the surprising factoids that I learned in Jared Diamonds book Collapse is that Iceland has been massively damaged by deforestation and sheep grazing, aggravated by the fragility of their volcanic ash based soils (vs the heavy, clay based soils the norsemen had become accustomed to in the rest of northern europe). Forest cover went from ~25% to 1% and half their soils are gone (p 200-1):

At the time that settlement of Iceland began, one-quarter of the island's area was forested. The settlers proceeded to clear the trees for pastures, and for using the trees themselves as firewood, timber, and charcoal. About 80% of that original woodland was cleared within the first few decades and 96% as of modern times, thus leaving only 1% of iceland's area still forested. Big chunks of scorched wood found in the earliest archaeological sites show that -incredible as it seems today- much of the wood from that land clearance was wasted or just burned, until icelanders realized that they would be short for the indefinite future. Once the original trees had been removed, grazing by sheep, and rooting by the pigs initially present, prevented seedlings from regenerating. As one drives across Iceland today, it is striking to notice how the occasional clump of trees still standing are mostly ones enclosed by fences to protect them from the sheep.

Iceland's highlands above tree line, supporting natural grassland on fertile shallow soil, were particularly attractive to the settlers, who didn't even have to clear trees there in order to create pastures. But the highlands were more fragile than the lowlands, because they were colder and drier, hence had lower rates of plant regrowth, and were not protected by woodland cover. Once the natural carpet of grasslands had been cleared or browsed off, the soil originating as windblown ash was now exposed to wind erosion. In addition, water running downhill, either as rain or as snowmelt runoff, could start to erode gullies into the now-bare soil. But as a gully developed and as the water table dropped from the level of the top of the gully to the bottom, the soil dried out and became even more subject to wind erosion. Within a short time after settlement, Iceland's soils began to be carried from the highlands down to the lowlands and out to sea. The highlands became stripped of soil as well as of vegetation, the former grasslands of Iceland's interior became the man-made (or sheep-made) desert that one sees today, and then large eroded areas started to develop in the lowlands as well.
by Rand
Mon Jul 18, 2011 5:23 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

PERCEPTION . . . Something To Think About. .

PERCEPTION . . . Something To Think About. .

http://www.jeffbridges.com/perception.html

Image

Read it through to the end....
by edfrank
Thu Sep 15, 2011 6:03 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: The tallest tree of Europe?

Here is a photo by Tomasz Niechoda of the tallest Scots pine in Bialowieza: http://www.monumentaltrees.com/nl/pol/podlachie/bialystok/2547_bosvanbialowiezabuitenhetnationalepark/3890/
and the page with some other trees in the Bialowieza forest outside the National Park: This pine is very thin, cbh is only 6.88 ft / 210 cm; near it are some pines up to 44 m (144 ft) tall with cbh up to 340 cm / 11.15 ft.

This is the Dutch language version, the English version of this page did not work today, I'll ask the webmaster, Tim Bekaert, to do something about it.
This pine is very thin, cbh is only 6.88 ft / 210 cm.
Here is also the page on some trees inside the Bialowieza National Park, here the English page is working: http://www.monumentaltrees.com/en/pol/podlaskie/bialystok/2435_nationalparkofbialowieza/.
Till now I did not translate the text of the Dutch version into English, I hope to do that in the near future.
Tomasz Niechoda this summer found some new heightrecord trees of Norway spruce, European aspen, silver birch and small-leaved lime. The list is ordered at cbh, you can also make it ordered at height, by clicking above the table.

Many more trees with photos can be seen at the website of Tomasz Niechoda: http://www.drzewa.puszcza-bialowieska.eu/. Best is to look at the Polish language part, because he did not update the English version the last two years.
You can search for the biggest or tallest trees of 11 species.

Jeroen
by Jeroen Philippona
Tue Sep 20, 2011 7:08 am
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Calvin and Hobbes Go for a Hike

Cute hiking cartoon I made into a 1 minute video:

Jenny

Download with Keepvid

by Jenny
Sat Mar 27, 2010 1:27 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

New 170 foot Liriodendron site

NTS,

Yesterday in Savage Gulf State Park I measured a 26.9" DBH X 170.6 foot tuliptree. This is the tallest known tree in the park at this time and a new site for this superlative height threshold. This tree further solidifies Savage Gulf as having the second highest Rucker Index (153.37) we know of in the eastern US. It is bracketed by the Smokies and Congaree NP.

As my hemlock treatment project progresses I am sure I will add a few more. At this time I am GPS-ing trees to return to since I am working in there and can't take too much time to measure. As an example, I waypointed three shagbark hickories over 150' yesterday. I also measured a stunning pignut hickory to 36.8" X 155.8'.

Will
by Will Blozan
Sat Dec 10, 2011 7:55 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Algonquin PP Old Growth/Canoeing video

This is a nice video, from a canoeing site I visit:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ztsc7qBYplk

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ztsc7qBYplk[/youtube]

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Sat Dec 10, 2011 9:54 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Owl Art

NTS,

Fifteen minutes ago I happened to look up from my computer and out the window, and what did my wandering eyes behold? Yes, a bard owl on a hemlock just outside of Monica's music room perched on a limb o a hemlock that Will treated for adelgid years ago. I grabbed my camera, ran up stairs, got Monica, and we went into her music room. The rest of the story is told in pictures. Note the little from outside and at the bottom of the window.

Behold the Bard of Florence.

BardOwl0.jpg

A little closer

BardOwl1.jpg

You gorgeous creature

BardOwl2.jpg

Keeping watch

BardOwl3.jpg

Ah for a little snooze

BardOwl4.jpg

Bob
by dbhguru
Sun Feb 05, 2012 10:53 am
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Owl Art

NTS,

One more image of the barred owl, which we have named Mr. Feathers, the Bard of Florence. He remains perched on the hemlock branch outside the music room window. Barred owls frequent our woods often. We feel blessed.

MrFeathers1.jpg


Bob
by dbhguru
Sun Feb 05, 2012 3:05 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Road decommissioning in the Allegheny N.F., Pennsylvania

WONDERFUL!!! I love to see old roads decommissioned! I wish they'd do the same thing with the auto roads that lead up to Clingman's Dome, Brasstown Bald, and Mount Mitchell! Another one that would be good to see gone forever is the Cherohala Skyway.
by jamesrobertsmith
Sat Feb 18, 2012 4:11 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Facebook/ Information Gathering

Ed,

It's kinda alarming just how closely facebook resembles the government's Total Information Awareness idea. It's like your life, totally instrumented and logged.
by Rand
Tue Mar 06, 2012 3:35 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: A favorite Norway spruce has fallen

Alas. But the regular work of Mother Nature in the forests.

I really like Norway spruce. One of the few non-native species that I enjoy seeing.

They remind me of the Sitka spruce, which might be my favorite tree.

Interestingly enough, Picea abies is considered a trash tree by a lot gardeners. The famed Michael Dirr describes it as a totally mediocre conifer. I feel there is some disparity between the horticultural world and the naturalist world, to say the least.
by RyanLeClair
Tue Apr 03, 2012 10:55 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: A favorite Norway spruce has fallen

Alas. But the regular work of Mother Nature in the forests.

I really like Norway spruce. One of the few non-native species that I enjoy seeing.
by jamesrobertsmith
Tue Apr 03, 2012 10:37 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: A favorite Norway spruce has fallen

It's sad when something like this happens, but if you accept it for what it is it actually has its own beauty.
by RyanLeClair
Tue Apr 03, 2012 10:05 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: New video of Chestnut Ridge, Allegheny N.F.

Wow! Lots of great country there in Pennsylvania! Let's have more Allegheney wilderness!
by jamesrobertsmith
Wed Feb 15, 2012 2:21 am
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Proposed Tracy Ridge Wilderness on the ANF featured

TBE: Proposed Tracy Ridge Wilderness on the ANF featured in national hiking magazine

http://www.pawild.org/articles/tbe11111.pdf

TracyRidgeNorthStar1.jpg

The Bradford Era
Tuesday, November 1, 2011

Proposed Tracy Ridge Wilderness Area on the ANF featured in national hiking magazine

WARREN -- The proposed Tracy Ridge Wilderness Area on the Allegheny National Forest is featured on the front cover of the newest issue of North Star: The magazine of the North Country Trail Association.

The photo of the proposed Tracy Ridge Wilderness Area featured in the new North Star, titled "Johnnycake Run Sunset," was taken by FAW executive director Kirk Johnson in the Johnnycake Run area near the Allegheny Reservoir.

Tracy Ridge, located in McKean and Warren Counties, is more than 9,500 acres in size -- by far the largest Roadless Area on the Allegheny -- and contains a nine-mile segment of the North Country National Scenic Trail.

The magazine chose to feature the site due to its being such a contiguous tract of wilderness-quality land containing a portion of the North Country Trail.

The Pennsylvania Chapter of the Sierra Club first proposed Tracy Ridge for wilderness designation in 1973, and their proposal was supported by then-U.S. Sens. Hugh Scott and Richard Schweiker.

In 2003, the Warren-based non-profit organization Friends of Allegheny Wilderness again proposed the pristine Tracy Ridge area for wilderness designation in their Citizens¹ Wilderness Proposal -- supported by the vast majority of public comments received.

Tracy Ridge and three other formally recognized roadless areas on the Allegheny, as well as tens of millions of additional roadless national forest acreage nationwide, are currently threatened by legislation pending in the U.S. Congress titled the Wilderness and Roadless Area Release Act (H.R. 1581/S. 1087). This act, commonly referred to as the Great Outdoors Giveaway bill, would release all roadless acreage to forms of development that are inconsistent with the preservation of wilderness values.

The North Country Trail is America¹s longest National Scenic Trail at more than 4,500 miles, and passes through seven states from North Dakota to New York. The Pennsylvania segment of the North Country Trail is 265 miles long in all.

-
Friends of Allegheny Wilderness
220 Center Street
Warren, PA 16365
814-723-0620
info@pawild.org
http://www.pawild.org

A Citizens' Wilderness Proposal for Pennsylvania's Allegheny National Forest: http://www.pawild.org/exec_summary.html

.
by edfrank
Mon Nov 07, 2011 10:05 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Proposed Tracy Ridge Wilderness on the ANF featured

I hope you guys get plenty of more wilderness designation!
by jamesrobertsmith
Mon Nov 07, 2011 10:26 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Keystone Wilderness Proposal Video

"KEYSTONE WILDERNESS: A Citizens' Wilderness Proposal for Pennsylvania's Allegheny National Forest"

Keystone Wilderness: A Citizens' Wilderness Proposal for Pennsylvania's Allegheny National Forest


Are you looking for an easy way to help spread the word about protecting wilderness in the Allegheny National Forest? Here's your chance, Keystone Wilderness: A Citizens' Wilderness Proposal for Pennsylvania's Allegheny National Forest is now available on DVD for you to show to gatherings of friends, family, conservation organizations, and other interested people.

The Allegheny National Forest is Pennsylvania's only national forest, but it currently has too few permanently protected areas. Located in northwest Pennsylvania, it includes many wild gems that may be protected as wilderness areas under the Wilderness Act of 1964 -- part of America's National Wilderness Preservation System.

This 16-minute film utilizes stunning photography and video of the prospective areas to be protected -- more than 50,000 acres of the 513,300-acre ANF. It is professionally narrated and explains what YOU can do to help protect wilderness in the Keystone State's only national forest. The film was produced by B.J. Gudmundsson of Patchwork Films and Friends of Allegheny Wilderness, which has led the way in studying and advocating for these special areas.

The Allegheny National Forest is Pennsylvania's only national forest. Located in northwestern Pennsylvania, it includes additional wild gems that may be protected as wilderness areas under the Wilderness Act of 1964.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3NaxaVBltEo

This is the first part of a new 16-minute film that utilizes stunning photography and video of the prospective areas to be protected -- more than 54,460 acres of the 513,300-acre Allegheny National Forest.

The film was produced by B.J. Gudmundsson of Patchwork Films and Friends of Allegheny Wilderness -- which has led the way in studying and advocating for these special areas.

Friends of Allegheny Wilderness online: http://www.pawild.org

Patchwork Films online: http://www.patchworkfilms.com

Part 2 of KEYSTONE WILDERNESS: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5_qkD7WY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5_qkD6Q7WY


.
by edfrank
Tue Nov 16, 2010 3:59 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Keystone Wilderness Proposal Video

The 16-minute campaign video Keystone Wilderness: A Citizens' Wilderness Proposal for Pennsylvania's Allegheny National Forest, documenting the critical campaign to protect wilderness in the Commonwealth's only national forest, has reached 930 views as of this morning.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fXKtvoc-0U

Can you please help us reach 1,000 views? Simply take a moment to email the YouTube link to Keystone Wilderness to all of your friends and family, post the link on your Facebook page wall, or "tweet" it out to the world! Perhaps you maintain a daily blog? That would be another great place to disseminate this important informational video!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fXKtvoc-0U

Also, if you use the terms "Friends of Allegheny Wilderness" and "Allegheny National Forest" together in your posts, that helps augment FAW's website in search results for search engines like Bing and Google.

Thank you for supporting the Allegheny's wilderness!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fXKtvoc-0U



--
Friends of Allegheny Wilderness
220 Center Street
Warren, PA 16365
814-723-0620
info@pawild.org
http://www.pawild.org

Please make a tax-deductible charitable donation today! http://www.active.com/donate/FAW

A Citizens' Wilderness Proposal for Pennsylvania's Allegheny National Forest: http://www.pawild.org/exec_summary.html

"Like" FAW on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Friends-of-Allegheny-Wilderness/76528176842

Keystone Wilderness: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fXKtvoc-0U
by edfrank
Thu Mar 29, 2012 10:25 am
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

$1 USGS Maps

Thought people here might be interested. $1 topo maps are a very good deal!
There are now over 60,000 maps and publications for sale for only a dollar now through May 7!
Going, going, gone! Huge Blow-out Sale on Maps and More!

http://www.usgs.gov/blogs/features/usgs_science_pick/going-going-gone-huge-blow-out-sale-on-maps-and-more
by Chris
Tue Apr 17, 2012 1:16 am
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Bear attack! (On my Doug-fir tree?!?!)

I hope your beloved tree stays healthy.

--Ryan
by RyanLeClair
Mon May 14, 2012 12:31 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Bear attack! (On my Doug-fir tree?!?!)

There is certainly no shortage of black bears in PA! Perhaps the bear was attracted to the scent of the sap from the pruning you had done. One thing about bears is that they are unpredictable.
by jamesrobertsmith
Mon May 14, 2012 5:02 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Bear attack! (On my Doug-fir tree?!?!)

There is certainly no shortage of black bears in PA! Perhaps the bear was attracted to the scent of the sap from the pruning you had done.
That was my thought.

Or maybe the bear is a real traditionalist. Only native trees! I hear they are getting radicalized....

http://store.afa-online.org/images/P/stickr_17230.jpg
by Chris
Mon May 14, 2012 7:46 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Silver (European) Birch and the Bronze Birch Borer

Yes, experience with Betula pendula.Paper(Canoe) birch would be a better choice, as would Whitespire Birch(listed as a Japanese white birch variety, but really a gray birch cultivar).
by Steve Galehouse
Sun May 20, 2012 11:29 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: What's wrong with my droopy Norway spruce?

In some ways that looks like the effect of a white pine weevil. What is not typical, is that the shoots just below the tip are not wilted also. But, regardless, that's my best guess.

If you can get a pole pruner up there you could snip off the top 6 inches or so of last year's growth. Then slice it lengthwise and see if there are little white grubs inside, and/or if the tissues just under the bark have been eaten. If so, it's weevil damage. If you can find the grubs, destroy them, and that can reduce the liklihood of repeated attacks.

But the damage normally is not severe. One of the side shoots usually turns upward to replace the leader. Occasionally a weevil attack can result in a double leader. If so, wait three years, and if one side has not asserted dominance, cut off one of the two leaders.

--Gaines
by gnmcmartin
Mon Jun 11, 2012 7:39 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic
cron