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Keystone Wilderness

Keystone Wilderness

FAWweb — May 26, 2009 — "KEYSTONE WILDERNESS: A Citizens' Wilderness Proposal for Pennsylvania's Allegheny National Forest"

The Allegheny National Forest is Pennsylvania's only national forest. Located in northwestern Pennsylvania, it includes additional wild gems that may be protected as wilderness areas under the Wilderness Act of 1964.

This is the first part of a new 16-minute film that utilizes stunning photography and video of the prospective areas to be protected -- more than 54,460 acres of the 513,300-acre Allegheny National Forest.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3NaxaVBltEo&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5_qkD6Q7WY&feature=related

The film was produced by B.J. Gudmundsson of Patchwork Films and Friends of Allegheny Wilderness -- which has led the way in studying and advocating for these special areas.

Friends of Allegheny Wilderness online: http://www.pawild.org

Patchwork Films online: http://www.patchworkfilms.com
by PAwildernessadvocate
Mon Apr 12, 2010 11:27 am
 
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Howard Zahniser rehearsing "Wilderness Forever"

The audio of Tionesta, Pennsylvania native and The Wilderness Society chief Howard Zahniser rehearsing his famous 1961 "Wilderness Forever" speech that lays out many of the principles of American conservationism expressed in the Wilderness Act of 1964 -- of which Zahniser is considered the principle author -- has been placed online on YouTube!

According to Howard Zahniser's son Ed, between listening to this speech, and Zahniser's "The Need for Wilderness Areas" piece, one can learn most of what he thought wilderness was all about.

This audio is of Howard Zahniser practicing the speech -- which he later famously gave to the Sierra Club's seventh biennial wilderness conference in San Francisco in April of 1961 -- in his Wilderness Society office at 2144 P Street NW in Washington, D.C.

The Wilderness Act was signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson on September 3, 1964. The Wilderness Act established the legal definition of wilderness in the United States, and permanently protected some 9 million acres of national forest land. It also established a mechanism by which ordinary citizens could encourage their federal legislators to add deserving areas to America's National Wilderness Preservation System. Through the passage of more than 140 additional laws since 1964, the National Wilderness Preservation System has now grown to nearly 110 million acres!

Wilderness Forever, Part 1:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkiAhVRx9rA

Wilderness Forever, Part 2:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYk2_QIxUP0

Wilderness Forever, Part 3:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ggh0qG6Ya-U

..
by PAwildernessadvocate
Mon Apr 12, 2010 11:19 am
 
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New video of Chestnut Ridge, Allegheny N.F.

New video profiling the proposed Chestnut Ridge Wilderness in the Allegheny National Forest:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2w0XzXXHNfU

Previous videos of other proposed ANF wilderness:

Minister Valley
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w-GOMA2_vCA

Hickory Creek Wilderness addition
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WfvzKyMzfKk

Morrison Run
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TWrft2DwwoM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bZSa_c_X_IQ
by PAwildernessadvocate
Wed Sep 15, 2010 12:26 pm
 
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Re: Living near trees

I am reading an archaeology book about Mesolithic societies in northern Europe. Thought some people might enjoy this passage about an area of settlement along an outlet river to a large lake in what is now known as Scandinavia that existed from about 6,700 BC through 4,000 BC (the town that is located at the site today is called Motala):

But what did it look like? To obtain a picture of vegetation in the immediate environment of the settlement site, macrofossils were collected from sediment in the water for analyses. Our "preconceived" picture that the settlement site was a bright, open place where the big trees had been chopped down to create a space in the depths of the surrounding Atlantic deciduous forests proved wrong. Pollen and macrofossils showed, on the contrary, that people had very little impact on the big trees. It was probably only the undergrowth that was cleared to make way for houses and other activities in the leafy shade of the trees (Regnell 2003). This picture of a settlement under the tree canopy is not unique for Motala. The Ertebølle site at Bökeberg in Skåne was established in the same way without the trees being cleared (Karsten 2001). Bonsall et al. (1987:201) have presented the same result from a Late Mesolithic settlement site in north-west England. The settlement sites and cultivation plots of the Linear Band culture (LBK) were likewise incorporated under the trees (Whittle 1996:149).

A functionalist conclusion is that the leafy environment at the Motala settlement site enabled fishing with leisters from stones just a few metres from the shore. Another interpretation could be that the trees growing on the site were part of the people's world-picture. It is not uncommon for trees to be a part of myths. The tree of life, spirits in the trees, and trees as animate beings are found in many ethnographical descriptions. The relationship of Mesolithic people to trees in other than a functionalist perspective is described by Jenny Moore (2003:142ff.). Instead of chopping down trees to open up a glade, people carefully selected which trees to let stand, because they contained living narratives which could not be destroyed.

From: Gruber, Göran, editor. 2005. "Identities in Transition: Mesolithic Strategies in the Swedish Province of Östergötland." Riksantikvarieämbetet, Stockholm. pages 49-50.
by PAwildernessadvocate
Wed Jul 20, 2011 9:10 am
 
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Re: New Tallest Tree for New Zealand

Spent about a month in New Zealand a little more than ten years ago. Visited a number of national parks and nature reserves on the both the north and south islands, purchased a few natural history books. Thought the following might be interesting.


Tallest native New Zealand tree: Kahikatea/White pine ( Dacrycarpus dacrydioides )

Reaching to 60 m, this is the tallest New Zealand tree, It is found all over the country from sea level to 600 m particularly in swampy areas, although it grows quite well on dry sites and hillsides. from The Reed Guide to New Zealand Native Trees

New Zealand's tallest native tree, the maginificent kahikatea ( Dacrycarpus dacrydioides ), can reach a height of more than 60 metres and lives for five or more centuries.

Like rimu and most of our other big timber trees, the kahikatea is a member of the ancient Podocarp family (characterized by seed suspended on a fleshy foot; see page 290). Of the New Zealand representatives of this family, the kahikatea is the most senior, with traces of pollen found in Jurassic rocks some 160-180 million years old. Sometimes kahikatea forests are refered to as 'dinosaur' forests because they existed at the same time as the dinosaurs. from The Natural World of New Zealand


Regarding the non-native Monterey pine ( Pinus radiata )

Planted in serried ranks throughout the country, radiata pine ( Pinus radiata ) is the tree upon which the New Zealand timber industry has largely been built. Today 1.3 million ha of the country is planted in exotic forest, 90 percent of which is radiata pine.

Radiata first came to prominence in Canterbury during the 1860s and 70s when it was planted for shelter belts. Impressed by the speed at which it grew and its tolerance of a variety of conditions, early foresters recommended plantations be sown in radiata.

The impulse behind the planting was to conserve native forests which were being fast logged out. From the 1920s the State Forest Service spearheaded a massive planting programme which saw Kaingaroa become one of the largest man-made forests in the world....

...On the northwest coast of the United States, the natural home of radiata pine, the tree has a much lower profile that it does in New Zealand. Known as the Monterey pine, its total habitat amounts to only 7000 ha and trees grow to just over half the 60 metres common in New Zealand.

Following New Zealand's example, countries such as Chile (which now has more hectares in pine than New Zealand), Australia, South Africa and Spain have planted radiata. from The Natural World of New Zealand


Regarding the question as to whether New Zealand has protected much forestland

The practice of wilderness preservation was still in its infancy when the summits of the sacred Central North Island volcanoes Tongariro and Ruapehu were offered to the nation as a national park in 1887. Tongariro National Park, as it became known, was New Zealand's first and only the fourth national park in the world, its formation made possible by the vision of the Tuwharetoa paramount chief Te Heuheu Tukino IV, and the tireless work of the artist, politician and preservationist William Fox.

Since 1887, 12 more national parks covering over 10 per cent of New Zealand have been created, guaranteeing absolute protection for all landforms, plants and animals within their boundaries. In 110 years New Zealand's national parks network has been developed to include an astonishing variety of wild landscapes - from the unpredictable volcanic highlands of Tongariro and the mystical forests and lakes of Te Urewera, to the lowland forests, rugged glaciated mountains and wild coastlines of Westland and Fiordland.

The international significance of the distinctive flora and fauna that inhabit thse diverse landscapes - relic survivors of ancient Gondwanaland which have evolved in isolation from other land for between 60-80 million years - has long been acknowledged by science. from National Parks of New Zealand

I believe it's true that New Zealand has protected a higher percentage of its land as national park land than any other country.
by PAwildernessadvocate
Tue Dec 27, 2011 8:49 pm
 
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Re: Path of tsunami debris mapped out

Just wait until you get to about the 1:50 mark in this video (Japan).

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2a--NC4Nong[/youtube]
by PAwildernessadvocate
Fri Feb 24, 2012 10:48 pm
 
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Re: Invasive species control

I worked for the National Park Service during the summer of 1999 not far from you in Rock Creek National Park in Washington, D.C. on their non-native invasive species control program. We used a variety of herbicides and mechanical methods to work toward eradicating ailanthus, multiflora rose, asiatic bittersweet, porcelain berry, kudzu, and many other invasives. It seemed like a losing battle.

My personal opinion is these species are here to stay, there's little we can do about it, and we won't know how everything is going to play out for maybe 500 years or more. Throw in some global warming just to make it interesting. Eventually some sort of ecological equilibrium will be established. But we've shuffled the global deck, and there's no putting the toothpaste back in the tube at this point. To mix metaphors.

That's not to say you shouldn't try to save individual trees and so forth in your particular park. Keep after the city arborists to at least try to tamp down your problem invasives in Baltimore.
by PAwildernessadvocate
Sun Apr 01, 2012 10:52 am
 
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Re: Ocala National Forest questions!

Although I've never actually been to the Ocala NF myself, if it was me I would probably gravitate toward the designated wilderness areas first.

Juniper Prairie is one, and there are also the Little Lake George, Billies Bay, and Alexander Springs Wilderness Areas in the Ocala NF.

Also in close proximity are the two units of the Lake Woodruff Wilderness Area, under the jurisdiction of the USFWS.

Little Lake George Wilderness
http://www.wilderness.net/index.cfm?fuse=NWPS&sec=wildView&WID=325

Juniper Prairie Wilderness
http://www.wilderness.net/index.cfm?fuse=NWPS&sec=wildView&WID=284

Billies Bay Wilderness
http://www.wilderness.net/index.cfm?fuse=NWPS&sec=wildView&WID=48

Alexander Springs Wilderness
http://www.wilderness.net/index.cfm?fuse=NWPS&sec=wildView&WID=6

Lake Woodruff Wilderness (Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge)
http://www.wilderness.net/index.cfm?fuse=NWPS&sec=wildView&WID=308&tab=General

http://www.wilderness.net/map.cfm?xmin=-9754449.5933&ymin=2870387.4013&xmax=-8911226.6266&ymax=3633159.1772

Ocala.jpg
by PAwildernessadvocate
Sun May 20, 2012 5:28 pm
 
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Re: Food for thought

Salmon ecologists have been paying closer and closer attention to site potential tree height.

Years ago, when doing a logging project near salmon streams, part of the contracts sometimes included "cleaning out" the streams by pulling all of the coarse woody debris out and keeping the channel clear. Well, around the late 1980s people studying salmon began to document the importance of coarse woody debris in retaining spawned-out salmon carasses within a stream's ecosystem (as opposed to being washed out to sea) where they are scavanged by a wide variety of animals, which in turn deposit the nutrients far and wide throughout the surrounding forest ecosystem in their leavings. The salmon spawning and being scavanged process has the ability to transport and distribute massive amounts of nutrients from the ocean deep into the continent's interior forest.

Now it is common knowledge that always retaining coarse woody debris in salmon stream is the way to go. One way to help do that is to remove no trees from the edge of the stream out to the site potential tree height during a logging project, to maximize the potential of coarse woody debris contribution to the stream over time. Sometimes logging contracts even include adding coarse woody debris to a stream if it is deficient in that area because of past management practices or something. Sometimes dead hatchery salmon are even deliberately dumped by the truckload high in a stream's drainage.

So that's just one practical example that goes to show it's important to have a handle on how tall trees can really grow.
by PAwildernessadvocate
Sat Jul 07, 2012 4:54 pm
 
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Re: Elwha River Dam Removals begins

Yahoo!

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=413425055377021

Here's a look at yesterday's controlled blast at the Glines Canyon Dam. The May-June fish window is over, giving contractors the month of July to lower the dam and reservoir levels before the next fish window begins August 1. Thanks to URS Corps for the video footage.
by PAwildernessadvocate
Tue Jul 03, 2012 4:54 pm
 
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White oak tree near Akeley, PA

I was reminded of the old white oak tree in Hale Cemetery at the corner of Gouldtown Road and Akeley Road near Akeley, PA (Warren County) during Ed Frank's recent presentation at Allegheny Outfitters in Warren. Dave from Allegheny Outfitters brought up the tree, and it jogged my memory. The last time I had been out to that cemetery a year or more ago I had noticed the tree, but was actually researching stuff under the ground at the time instead of stuff above the ground. So to speak.

Went back out to see it again and take a few pictures this past week. I also measured the dbh at approximately 78.5", more than six and a half feet.

Hale Cemetery from the south.
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Oak from the south side of the cemetery.
100_0566.JPG

Oak from the north side of the cemetery.
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100_0568.JPG

The tree is too big for my d-tape (which only goes up to 76.5")!
100_0571.JPG
by PAwildernessadvocate
Sat Jul 14, 2012 11:16 am
 
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Re: Green River in Dinosaur National Monument, UT

Incredible place, and it was almost lost to a damned dam project.


Great pictures! Thanks for posting!

Yep, the confluence of the Green and Yampa Rivers was the site of a monumental 'to dam or not to dam' tug-of-war in the early 1950s the likes of which hadn't been seen since the great Hetch Hetchy debate. Opposition to the dam was led by David Brower of the Sierra Club and Tionesta, Pennsylvania-native Howard Zahniser of The Wilderness Society. When they won the battle and prevented the dam from going in to Dinosaur National Monument, Zahniser immediately parlayed the nationwide momentum for conservation that campaign had generated into a new campaign for the Wilderness Act, which he wrote and had introduced into Congress in 1956. That scenic site at Dinosaur NM in some ways could be considered the genesis of the campaign for the Wilderness Act!
by PAwildernessadvocate
Wed Jul 25, 2012 11:22 pm
 
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Re: Curiosity has landed on the Red Planet

Doesn't look like it's found any trees yet.

;)
by PAwildernessadvocate
Mon Aug 06, 2012 8:52 pm
 
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Re: New video of Chestnut Ridge, Allegheny N.F.

A few scenes from a recent hike into the proposed Minister Valley Wilderness Area:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wETOrRau7ow[/youtube]

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wETOrRau7ow
by PAwildernessadvocate
Fri Apr 06, 2012 8:56 am
 
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A 969-year-old Eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis)

Several years ago I posted this information to the old ENTS email list, so I thought I would repost it in the BBS forum too for people to see.

I have a copy of a USDA Forest Service publication titled "The Tionesta Natural and Scenic Area, Allegheny National Forest" and dated March 1943. The document focuses on the 4,100-acre Tionesta old-growth forest straddling the county line in southern Warren and McKean Counties. However, when describing the age and size that Eastern hemlocks ( Tsuga canadensis ) can achieve on page six it also mentions the following about a 969-year-old hemlock in Luzerne County:

The ability to grow slowly beneath the shade of competing trees and to outlive the hardwoods is characteristic of hemlock and is one reason why it is so abundant in the virgin forest. A hemlock cut in Luzerne County near Mud Lake in 1893 and carefully counted by Dr. D.S. Hartline gave the astonishing record of 969 years on the stump. This is the maximum age known for this species.

Has anyone ever seen any other documentation of Tsuga canadensis living more than 500 or 600 years or so? 969 years is amazing!

Tionesta1943document2.jpg
by PAwildernessadvocate
Sun Jul 15, 2012 10:29 pm
 
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Re: Chernobyl's de facto Wilderness Area

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KH29JFybz8[/youtube]

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KH29JFybz8
by PAwildernessadvocate
Thu Oct 04, 2012 3:11 pm
 
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Re: Bear attack! (On my Doug-fir tree?!?!)

If anyone is interested/curious, my tree lived through the summer just fine. A number of small branches died, and it didn't really put on much new growth, but lots of new tissue grew over almost all of the deep claw marks on the trunk of the tree.

To help the tree, I immediately staked it upright on the morning I found it tipped over, fertilized it with four Jobe's evergreen spikes (this was May), watered it whenever there was dry weather, and fertilized it again with four Jobe's evergreen spikes in mid-July.

I will want to leave it staked for at least another growing season. Ideally I should probably leaved it staked through the 2014 growing season as well, but I'll probably just take it off about this time next year and leave it at that. Should be ok (unless another bear attacks it, ha ha!).

100_0792.JPG

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100_0794.JPG
by PAwildernessadvocate
Fri Oct 19, 2012 2:44 pm
 
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Re: Hurricane Sandy Damage to Trees, Central Park, NYC

20121107Oaks2-blog480.jpg

Looks like a lot of nice-sized commercially usable logs in those piles if you ask me. I hope some of those will at least be used for something other than mulch. Maybe bring in a little money for the management/clean up of the park or something.

Hey isn't this the baseball field where George Costanza knocked out Bette Midler? Ha ha just kidding!

http://static1.businessinsider.com/image/509011afecad046d24000011-590-443/central-park-hurricane-sandy.jpg
by PAwildernessadvocate
Mon Nov 19, 2012 9:02 pm
 
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Re: Tracey Ridge Chestnuts


Chestnut sprouts are common in the entire area. I'd think a thorough bushwacking in the numerous small coves off the ridge would turn up some more big ones.

Thank you very much for your trip report. Tracy Ridge is in fact an area that is proposed for permanent protection as wildenress under the Wilderness Act of 1964:

http://www.pawild.org/images/maps/tracy_ridge.jpg

It is true that there are a lot of chestnut trees to be found throughout that area. However, if you go across State Route 321 from Tracy Ridge, you will be in another proposed wildenress area -- Chestnut Ridge:

http://www.pawild.org/images/maps/chestnut_ridge.jpg

Here you will find even more chestnut trees, mostly along the top of the ridge line in the northern end of the area.

If both Chestnut Ridge and Tracy Ridge were designated by Congress as wilderness areas under the WIlderness Act, that would establish a large block of permanently undisturbed, completely unmanaged forest land approximately 15,000 acres in size (albeit bisected by SR 321), and provide an ideal core block for the eventual permanent recovery of the American chestnut tree.

If anyone is interested, here is a template letter that you can download and edit as you see fit, and then mail to your representative in Congress to support wilderness preservation in the Allegheny National Forest:

http://www.pawild.org/FAWSupportLetter.doc

If you do not know who your U.S. Rep and two U.S. Senators are, you can find out at http://www.house.gov and http://www.senate.gov

For more information about the wilderness campaign for the Allegheny National Forest, log on to http://www.pawild.org
by PAwildernessadvocate
Wed Oct 12, 2011 11:04 am
 
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Re: Landslide on 441

441 should be permanently closed! Fill in the grade and plant it with native shrubs and trees and expunge it from existence! Along with the Clingman's Dome Road and the road to Cades Cove.

From a purely ecological point of view, no one would ever catch me complaining if this actually happened!

Given the importance of the road to the nature tourism economy of Cherokee, Gatlinburg and other local communities I doubt it will happen though.
by PAwildernessadvocate
Fri Jan 25, 2013 10:28 pm
 
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Presentation in Warren Sat., 2/16 on Allegheny's Big Trees

Please Join the Native Tree Society, Friends of Allegheny Wilderness, and Allegheny Oufitters for a presentation on the Big Trees of the Allegheny Islands Wilderness!

When: Saturday, February 16th, 2013, 11:00 a.m.

Where: Allegheny Outfitters, 430 Pennsylvania Avenue West, Warren, Pennsylvania, 16365

Free and open to the public!

Once an area of Eastern second or third growth forestland is set aside for preservation, and all overt management activities are eliminated from that area in perpetuity -- such as by designating portions of the Allegheny National Forest as wilderness areas under the Wilderness Act of 1964 -- massive individual trees, later-successional forests, and old-growth forests will ultimately emerge with time through the inevitable process of natural succession. These remarkable tree specimens will be a tremendous natural legacy for future generations of people and wildlife alike to benefit from.

On Saturday, February 16th, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. the Native Tree Society, Friends of Allegheny Wilderness, and Allegheny Outfitters are sponsoring Ed Frank of the Native Tree Society presenting the findings if his organization's report, Trees and Forests of the Allegheny River Islands Wilderness and Nearby Islands. Below please find a link to this recently published report (15.8 MB document). Also included in the report is an extensive section on the logging history of the region.

The Native Tree Society is one of the many local, regional, statewide, and national organizations that have formally endorsed the Citizens' Wilderness Proposal for Pennsylvania's Allegheny National Forest.

Native Tree Society online: http://www.nativetreesociety.org

http://www.nativetreesociety.org/specialreports/ARIW_Report_Dec2011.pdf [15.8 MB]

Trees and Forests of the Allegheny River Islands Wilderness and Nearby Islands
By Edward Frank, Dale Luthringer, Carl Harting, and Anthony Kelly

Native Tree Society Special Publication Series: Report #10

Introduction
This report compiles the results as of December 2011 for the ongoing project of documenting forests and trees of the islands of the Allegheny River Island Wilderness and nearby islands in the middle Allegheny River in north central Pennsylvania. The islands included in this report are located in a stretch extending from the Buckaloons Recreation Area, seven miles downstream of Warren, Pennsylvania through Holeman Island, four miles downstream of Tionesta, Pennsylvania. This includes all of the islands in the Allegheny River Islands Wilderness, a number of forest service islands, and several private islands. Major islands investigated among others include, Crull's Island, Thompson's Island, Courson Island, Hemlock Island, King Island, Baker Island, and Holeman Island. At the present time some of the islands have been visited multiple times by groups of people, while others have seen only a quick scouting survey, or have not yet been visited.



--
Friends of Allegheny Wilderness
220 Center Street
Warren, PA 16365
814-723-0620
info@pawild.org
http://www.pawild.org
by PAwildernessadvocate
Tue Feb 05, 2013 3:42 pm
 
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Re: Presentation in Warren Sat., 2/16 on Allegheny's Big Tre

Here are a couple of pictures from Saturday's presentation. Thanks again to Ed Frank for all of the interesting information about the big trees of the Allegheny Islands Wilderness! Many of those in attendance have already told me how much they enjoyed the program. I would say about 15 people attended.

100_1046.JPG

100_1044.JPG
by PAwildernessadvocate
Mon Feb 18, 2013 2:15 pm
 
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Re: Question about tree diseases and pests ect

Rand wrote:I wonder what nasty diseases we have to give back?


Well, I hope we never send the bronze birch borer to Europe, for one example.

viewtopic.php?f=21&t=4109
by PAwildernessadvocate
Tue Aug 13, 2013 11:29 pm
 
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New England sees a return of forests, wildlife

http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2013/08/31/new-england-sees-return-forests-and-wildlife/lJRxacvGcHeQDmtZt09WvN/story.html

New England sees a return of forests, wildlife

A wilderness comeback is underway across New England, one that has happened so incrementally that it’s easy to miss.

But step back and the evidence is overwhelming.

Today, 80 percent of New England is covered by forest or thick woods. That is a far cry from the mere 30 to 40 percent that remained forested in most parts of the region in the mid-1800s, after early waves of settlers got done with their vast logging, farming, and leveling operations.

According to Harvard research, New England is now the most heavily forested region in the United States — a recovery that the great naturalist Henry David Thoreau once thought impossible.

Meanwhile, some creatures of fur and feather have returned at astonishing speed — herds and flocks where there were just remnant populations; clear evidence of ecosystem revivals occurring over decades or even years, instead of centuries.

[More at above link.]
by PAwildernessadvocate
Wed Sep 04, 2013 3:09 pm
 
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Re: Is it possible to transplant a mature tree?

Here's one example of it being done recently. This was June of 2012, so I don't know if the tree is doing ok today or not. I also wonder how many other trees had to die so they could build that wooden container around the root mass of this one oak tree, ha ha.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BFTj0hM3DHM
by PAwildernessadvocate
Sat Feb 01, 2014 6:17 am
 
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