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Christ Church Yew

ENTS,

Looking over the post regarding some of Great Britain's old trees ( http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=196&t=2347 ) reminded me of an old yew (Taxus baccata) that I was able to see in 2007. The yew is located in the Christ Church cemetary in the old city region of Dover, Delaware. The shrub was planted in 1740 and continues to thrive. The folks at the church are very proud of their yew (as well as their history in the community) and will gladly show you around if asked.

Sorry about the picture quality. These are scanned from film.

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p.s. this is what will happen if you do not keep the hedges trimmed around the house!

Steve Springer
by TN_Tree_Man
Tue Apr 12, 2011 8:42 pm
 
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Re: Daniel Boone Carving on Beech Tree, TN

ENTS,

I think that a couple of Boone Beeches are being confused. The one that JohnHagy is looking for in Eastern Tennessee (Washington County) is gone. The one cited by The Tennessee Urban Forestry Council http://www.tufc.com/registries.html is legitimate and is located in a farm field outside of Jackson, Tennessee (West Tennessee). Documentation regarding its authenticity is vast enough to be convincing.

Steve Springer
by TN_Tree_Man
Mon Apr 16, 2012 9:51 am
 
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Ocean Invasive Exotics

ENTS,

This may be of some interest to some regarding the potential introduction of invasives off of the coast of Oregon from the "recent" tsunami in Japan. One wonders how many exotic (or those classified as exotic) species have been introduced through natural disturbances and not just by the hand of man.

http://apnews.myway.com/article/20120609/D9V9RA7O2.html

Steve Springer
by TN_Tree_Man
Sun Jun 10, 2012 1:13 pm
 
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Re: Ideas for saving a Norway spruce from the power company?

Does anyone know of a way for the power company to alter the path of the power line (short of installing a whole new utility pole) so that it no longer touches the tree? Is there anything like a one or two foot extension or arm that can be installed on the pole that will slightly redirect the line and open up another good foot or so of space between the trunk of the tree and the power line? Another idea I think I've seen is where a utility company will install a large-diameter plastic (PVC?) sleeve on the power line itself where it is making contact with a tree in order to prevent the tree from growing live tissue around the line.


Assuming that the wire is the house service wire, you have a couple of options with the local power company for consideration:

(1) You can bury the service wire from the transformer pole to the house thereby removing the need for future tree trimming as well as potential service interruptions. Just be sure that you bore the hole for the conduit and power line under the root zone rather than simply dig a trench so you will not damage or kill the tree.

(2) You can request that the utility relocate the service wire away from the tree. Keep in mind that Norway spruce will get very large so allow plenty of open space for relocated power line.

Contact the Engineering Department of the power utility for options and prices. Usually the power company will provide these services. You will probably have to pay the costs for either option.

Those "sleeves" that you may see are insulated, usually made of rubber, designed for a temporary safe guard and are not considered long term solutions. I would recommend against having someone install a "sleeve" on the service wire. Chances are high that serious injury or death could occur if someone not properly trained to work around high voltage power lines attempts to install something, and the utility will probably not allow it anyway.

I hope that this helps.

Steve Springer
by TN_Tree_Man
Mon Aug 20, 2012 4:26 pm
 
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