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Historical Photos of the Southern Forests

ENTS, I was looking for old southern forest photos and came across these photos on Flickr.http://www.flickr.com/photos/41460075@N08/sets/72157622984778649/ I thought ENTS would be very interested in them. There are a lot of photos from North Carolina showing the old growth, Spurce, Poplar, White Pine, Hemlock, etc. Various southern states are shown with virgin timber. Some of you probably know some of these locations. I haven't seen many photos like these, I wanted you guys to have a look at them. The author is a group called "Southern Forests for the Future" http://www.seesouthernforests.org/ about the project: http://www.seesouthernforests.org/about/project This in turn is a project of the World Resources Institute: http://www.wri.org/

Larry
by Larry Tucei
Sat Mar 27, 2010 8:56 am
 
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Flowering Trees and Plants

ENTS, Some photos from last weekend of several different plants and trees in my region blooming. Spring is the most beautiful time of the year. Larry
by Larry Tucei
Sat Mar 20, 2010 9:59 pm
 
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Re: Southern Magnolia

Steve, Beautiful flowers! I'm attaching two photos of the Ms. State Champion Southern Magnolia. It should be the National Champion. Age is around 300 years estimated. More likely 200-250. Larry
by Larry Tucei
Fri Mar 19, 2010 4:12 pm
 
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Re: most impressive live oak

Gary, One Live Oak just couldn't be the most impressive, there all that way to me. Here are some of my favorite Live Oaks. I have so many these are just a few of them. Larry
by Larry Tucei
Fri Mar 19, 2010 3:57 pm
 
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Re: Oak Trees are awesome

Ed, Fasinating stuff thats way cool! Lets ask the math Guru a question. Bob, at 55 lbs a Cubic Ft., a limb say 12 Cir., at the tree tapering to 1 ft., 75' long would way what? Tons of force where the limb meets the Trunk. Some of the Live Oak limbs are even larger. I'll go back and review some of the trees I've measured and post the results. Perhaps the twisting of the grain on Live Oak limbs is the secret to there strength. Great topic, Ed! I'm attaching a photo for a good example the limb in the photo left is over 12' Cir, and 75' long. At almost 90 degrees to the trunk the forces here are awesome! Larry
by Larry Tucei
Sat Apr 03, 2010 9:08 am
 
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Red Bay Tree and the Ambrosia beetle

ENTS, I just found about an insect infestation the Ambrosia Beetle. PASCAGOULA — An Asian beetle smaller than a grain of rice has begun eating its way through Mississippi’s coastal forests and is likely headed for Alabama.

The ambrosia beetle targets the ubiquitous red bay and close relatives in the laurel family, such as sassafras. Scientists say it has the potential to wipe out some of the most common trees in the swamps and wetlands along the Gulf coast. By some estimates, hundreds of trees have already died along the Pascagoula River.

The beetles bore pinhead-sized holes into the trees, then munch on the soft wood just under the bark. That is not what kills the trees. The beetles carry a fungus that infects the trees and prevents water movement from the roots into the crown, according to scientists. Starved of water, the trees die, their leaves wilting and turning brown, giving the disease its common name — laurel wilt.

“Red bay is a major component of the forest understory in the bay swamp habitat,” said Will Underwood, a wildlife biologist with the Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve. “They produce a fairly large berry that is used by birds, squirrels, bears, all kinds of wildlife. Their absence will be a big deal in the forests around here.”

As he spoke, Underwood peeled the bark away from an infected tree, exposing dozens of tiny bore holes in the trunk. Beneath the bark, the wood carried the telltale black stain caused by the fungus. Dozens of beetles floated at the bottom of a sentinel trap hanging from the tree. Every red bay in the vicinity was dead.

Underwood said he has seen a few trees around Grand Bay that appear to show early signs of infestation, which would mark the first appearance of the disease in Alabama.

Similar fungal diseases carried by other kinds of beetles were responsible for virtually wiping out chestnut trees and the American elm. Decades later, efforts are under way to restore both species, and scientists said it might be possible for the red bay to rebound at some point in the distant future.

There is no known cure or antidote for the fungus, which is native to Japan, India and Taiwan.

Scientists believe the laurel wilt beetles arrived in the U.S. on wooden shipping pallets or containers arriving at coastal ports.

It is possible the Mississippi infestation began with an infected shipment arriving at the port of Pascagoula. Scientists were surprised when the disease was discovered at several locations in Jackson County, as there hadn’t been any sign of it along Florida’s Panhandle or in Alabama.



Read more: http://www.sunherald.com/2010/04/12/2094134/beetles-carry-fungus-that-is-killing.html#ixzz0l0R27cnv
Great, the trees have enough problems already! Larry
by Larry Tucei
Tue Apr 13, 2010 2:25 pm
 
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Re: Tree Haiku

Ed, Jenny, Steve, Live Oaks Spreading Wide Massive Trunks and Limbs collide Leaves and Moss year round
by Larry Tucei
Tue Apr 13, 2010 2:44 pm
 
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Southern Magnolia

ENTS, Monday we had a golf tournament for work, at Gulf Hills golf course located in Ocean Springs, Ms., and I photographed a Magnolia on #18 that is a larger than average. A multi-trunk specimen that was around 100 years old. The course was built in 1927 so the tree may have been planted then. CBH-15, Height-70' , spread-35' estimated, I'll go back and measure it but it doesn't come close to the biggest I've done.
by Larry Tucei
Fri Mar 19, 2010 11:56 am
 
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Pond Pine

ENTS, Some Pond Pine photos from Gulf Hills golf course in Ocean Springs, Ms. I'll go back and measure them, Height to about 70', CBH-10,11' estimated. We have alot of the Pond Pine down in South Ms., but I just haven't reported on them much. The other Pine in the second photo is a Slash Pine note the bark difference. Larry
by Larry Tucei
Fri Mar 19, 2010 2:20 pm
 
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Live Oak Flowering

ENTS, The Live Oaks are now flowering on the coast and will have new leaves within the next few weeks. A photo of the small flowers from a tree in my yard.
Q. virginiana is monoecious. Small flowers are produced in spring during the growth period for new leaves. Pollen is dispersed by winds, generally during early April. Larry
by Larry Tucei
Sat Mar 20, 2010 9:33 pm
 
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Bay St. Louis Ms. Live Oaks

Ents, I found two more Live Oaks in Bay St. Louis, Ms., that will make the listing. Growing at 128 Keller St., Bay St. Louis Ms. The first is the Anniversary Oak, CBH-20' 7", Spread-133.5' x 108' and Height- 65''. The second tree, The Katrina Oak, CBH- 24', Spread-120' x 60' and Height-25'. Both trees had damage during Hurricane Katrina. Saltwater at 35' put around 10' of water under both trees and wind damage was severe on the Katrina Oak. Severing a 5' dia., limb and dropping it on the home owner’s house. The Oaks grow approx., 300 and 400 yards from the Bay on a ridge that runs the length of the western edge of Bay St Louis. This area suffered the most destruction during Katrina with winds in excess of 130 mph and a 35'-40' storm surge! The Oaks are recovering nicely here and along the whole Ms. Coast. The listing is now at 150 trees and growing. Some photos of the two trees. Larry
by Larry Tucei
Mon May 10, 2010 11:57 am
 
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The Lichgate Oak, Tallahassee, FL

ENTS, I measured another Live Oak in Tallahassee Florida over the weekend. The Lichgate Oak is a beautiful tree growing at 1401 High Road, Tallahassee Florida. The tree was protected by Laura Jepsen when she purchased the property in the 1955. The limbs on the oak drop to the ground in several places and make for a stunning apperance. CBH-22'3", Spread-144' x 136.5, and Height-62.1'. I've known about this particular Live Oak for a few years and decided it was time to make the 5 hour drive over to measure it. A couple of photos and a link about the Oak. http://lichgate.com/history.html Larry
by Larry Tucei
Mon May 24, 2010 10:51 am
 
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Re: Campground pines

Bob, Theres been reports of an old guy with a hat running around spreading miracle grow. I hope they catch that guy soon, they say he's been seen all over New England! Larry
by Larry Tucei
Thu May 27, 2010 9:47 pm
 
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The Chain Oak

ENTS, On Saturday July 3 2010 I traveled to Mt. Olive, Ms., in search of a large Live Oak that two Co-workers passed on a lake outing. The Chain Oak grows adjacent to an old homestead at 409 Chain-Warren Rd., measurements of CBH-22', Height-51.5' and Spread-139.5' x 131.5'. The Oak is very healthy and a majestic tree between 150-200 years old. The Chain Oak is the most northern Live Oak I have measured in the state of Ms., growing 115 miles inland from the Ms. Coast. Some photos of this beautiful Live Oak. Mr. Ross Chain in the photo.

Larry
by Larry Tucei
Sun Jul 04, 2010 5:38 pm
 
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Re: St Andrews State Park.

James, I read about them and some other Live Oak sub species a couple of years ago. This profusion of common names partly reflects an ongoing controversy about the classification of various live oaks, in particular its near relatives among the white oaks (Quercus subgenus
Subgenus
In biology, a subgenus is a taxonomic rank directly below genus. See rank and rank .In zoology, a subgeneric name can be used independently or included in a species name, in parentheses, placed between the generic and specific name: e.g...

Quercus, section Quercus). Some authors recognize as distinct species forms that others consider to be varieties of Quercus virginiana. Notably, the following two taxa, treated as species in the Flora of North America, are treated as varieties of Southern live oak by the United States Forest Service
United States Forest Service
The United States Forest Service is an agency of the United States Department of Agriculture that administers the nation's 155 national forests and 20 national grasslands, which encompass 193 million acres...

: the Texas live oak
Texas live oak
Quercus fusiformis , commonly known as Texas Live Oak, is an evergreen or nearly evergreen tree native to the southern United States...

, Quercus fusiformis (a.k.a. Q. virginiana var. fusiformis) and
the Sand live oak, Quercus geminata (a.k.a. Q. virginiana var. geminata).

Matters are further complicated by the fact that Southern live oak hybridizes with both the above two species, and also with dwarf live oak (Q. minima), swamp white oak
Swamp White Oak
The Swamp White Oak , is a species of oak in the white oak section Quercus section Quercus, primarily found in the Midwestern and Eastern Seaboard regions of North America, from southernmost Quebec and southern Maine west to eastern Kansas. It is rare south of the Ohio River...

(Q. bicolor), Durand oak (Q. durandi), overcup oak
Overcup Oak
Quercus lyrata is an oak in the white oak group . It is native to lowland wetlands in the southeastern United States, from Delaware and southern Illinois south to northern Florida and southeast Texas....

(Q. lyrata), bur oak
Bur oak
The Quercus macrocarpa or Bur Oak, sometimes spelled Burr Oak, is a species of oak in the white oak section Quercus sect. Quercus, native to North America in the eastern and midwestern United States and south-central Canada...

(Q. macrocarpa), and post oak
Post oak
Quercus stellata is an oak in the white oak group. It is a small tree, typically 10–15 m tall and 30–60 cm trunk diameter, though occasional specimens reach 30 m tall and 140 cm diameter. It is native to the eastern United States, from Connecticut in the northeast, west to southern Iowa, southwest...

(Q. stellata). Larry
by Larry Tucei
Thu Jul 08, 2010 9:01 pm
 
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Re: Panama City Beach

James, The Myrtle Oak is another species very similar to Live Oak but dwarfed. The acorns are dark brown to black. Larry
by Larry Tucei
Thu Jul 08, 2010 9:10 pm
 
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The Methodist Oak

ENTS, Sunday the 19th of Sept., I measured another Live Oak in Gulfport, Ms. This fine tree is growing on the Methodist Church property at 219 Courthouse Rd., Gulfport Ms. The tree is a beautiful specimen with a cool twisting pattern on the trunk. Many Live Oaks display this in there growth patterns and we've discussed this in the past. An added plus, I obtained a copy of measurement documentation by an arborist form 1974. I'll get back to that later. The measurements are CBH-20' 1", Height- 51' and Spread- 120' x 118'. Making the listing at # 146, the listing is now at 154 trees! If I did this full time I'm sure the listing would be many more 20' + Live Oaks. I don't measure much in July, Aug, or Sept due to unpleasant heat and humidity. I scout the coastal areas for big trees and when I due find one I'll measure it. Two photos of the Methodist Oak. Larry
by Larry Tucei
Mon Sep 20, 2010 5:16 pm
 
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Re: Middleton and Angel Oaks

ENTS, An updated Live Oak listing now at 156 trees! Larry

Live_Oak_Project_20101227.xlsx
by Larry Tucei
Tue Oct 26, 2010 5:24 pm
 
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Liriodendron tulipifera and Champion Trees

Bob, ENTS, Tulip trees are amazing. In the Ms Champion Tree listing- Liriodendron tulipifera, Cir-18' 3' Crown-81' Height- 145' Points-382.75 located in Amite Co., Ms. One of my future tasks is to confirm the Ms Champion Listing, and we all now how wrong these can be. The proplem with our listing is location, it's only by County, Owner and Nominator. It would be great to have a GPS or more specific location. I guess this protects the trees from vandals, to bad, it makes it difficult to locate them. I'll contact the County Forester or whoever in Amite Co., and start with this species for my Friend Bob. I have confirmed the Ms Champion Live Oak of course. The listing has it at Cir- 30' 6", Crown-150', and Height-90'. I confirmed it to Cir- 33' 1', Crown-155.75 or 156' and Height-63'. For a total of 499 points! The tree was last measured several years ago and has grown some but the height wasn't even close, which shows why I need to update the Ms Champion listing. I also confirmed our old Southern Magnolia Champion, Magnolia grandiflora to Cir-17' 7"", Crown-66' and Height- 109'. It is second to a Multi-trunked tree in Jones Co., Ms. which is bull. The old champ should really be the National Champ! I have measured two Champs in Ms., but have many remaining. It may be time to spread my wings a bit. So many trees, So little time! ENTS rules! Larry
by Larry Tucei
Wed Oct 27, 2010 3:32 pm
 
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Re: Trees in Boxes

Ed, James,

Live Oaks due well when transplanted properly. Some large Live Oaks have been transplanted in South Ms, and La., with great success. One tree in La.,It took hundreds of people working over 48 hours to re-plant the live oak tree (Quercus Virginiana) on Ol’ Man Island. It is the largest living oak tree ever to be transplanted, with an original height of 55 feet and a weight of approximately 85 tons (including box and dirt). This live oak, and its sister tree in front of Port Orleans Riverside, were transplanted from the site that now contains Disney’s Animal Kingdom theme park. A wooden plaque on the island reads as follows:

“On Earth Day April 22, 1991 this majestic Live Oak was placed in its new home before you, The Oak and its companion at the entrance of Disney’s Port Orleans Resort Riverside each weighed 85 tons and were transplanted from a wooded location 13 miles away. Cypress boxes 22 foot square were constructed around and beneath each Oak, and after months of preparation, the transportation took three days. Ol’ Man Island was then constructed around this Oak as you see it now."

In Ms, Here’s an interesting story about a large tree, although not a champion tree.

The largest tree in the world ever transplanted, a live oak weighing almost 300 tons, was picked up and moved 100 yards during the weekend of April 13-14, 1996, in Biloxi, Mississippi. This giant tree—593,049 pounds, 50 feet tall, a trunk 52 inches in diameter and branch circumference 95 feet wide—was actually the largest of 3 giant live oaks that Grand Casino contracted to be moved in order to preserve them. This world-record transplant was performed by Environmental Design, a Houston, Texas firm. The cost was $35,000 for the actual uprooting and moving, with the total contract for the project estimated at $60,000.

Larry
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by Larry Tucei
Thu Dec 16, 2010 11:58 am
 
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Noxubee NWR Part II

ENTS, The following day on the 28th of Dec., I decided to measure some Trees on the Noxubee River East of Bluff Lake. The road in is lined on both sides with tall Loblolly's with Oak, Sweet Gum, White Oak, Swamp Chestnut Oak, Water Oak, Nuttall Oak, Shumard Red Oak, and Southern Red Oak mixed in. This road goes in about 2 miles and at the end is the Trail of Big Trees where I reported on back in 09. I only walked in about a half. The Oaks, Cypress dominate along and around the River with small Pine ridges mixed in. I only measured 9 trees of 5 species, Loblolly Pine, Nutall Oak, Overcup Oak, Sycamore, and Tulip. It was 19 that morning so I moved around a lot, walking along the River enjoying the serenity. The tallest Loblolly of the day was 138' and new Ms., height record for me. Another big surprise was a 132' Nutall Oak, with a huge crown, 90' x 96’, which is another record for me. My last find of the day was a huge Tulip, Bob, 132', another record for me in Ms. It was one of only a handful of Tulips that I found. I also measured a Cypress knee 4' 3" near a small lake on the west side for you James. The water was low and I was able to walk around and into the lake. I spent about 4 hours measuring and photographing before I returned to my truck. Here are some photos and a listing of my finds during my 2 days of measuring. Noxubee is a special place and so diverse I hope it remains so for many years. Larry
by Larry Tucei
Wed Jan 05, 2011 8:37 pm
 
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Liriodendron tulipifera

ENTS, Bob,

http://www.stateparks.com/tombigbee.html

While hunting in the Tombigee NF in Winston Co., Ms., this past weekend I measured 5 Tulips for Neils study. Three of the 5 trees were growing near Mill Creek at 369' eleavation, N 33 11.656, W 88 58.222. The other two trees growing in the ridge at 500' elv., N 33 11.537, W 88 57.955. The Creek contains large Tulip, White Oak, Red Oak, Riverbirch, Gum, etc. The ridges surrounding the creek contain Loblolly, Shortleaf Pine to 3' Dia, and Heights to 120's, with mixed hardwoods and tulips. The creek and the ridge to the southeast was very serene and has many large Tulips Dia, to 3' and heights to 130'.

CBH Height Lat Long Terrain
7’ 5” 110’ N 33 11.537 W 88 57.955 Ridges
9’ 117’ “ “ “
6’ 8” 114’ “ “ “
10’ 5” 129’ N 33 11.656 W 88 58.222 Creek
7’ 10” 123’ “ “ “

I didn't have my camera with me but I will go back at a later date and get some photos. These are some of the biggest Tulips I've seen in the state. One added surprise I found and measured a River Birch, CBH- 9' Height-75' the largest one to date in my state.

Larry

tulip.JPG

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by Larry Tucei
Wed Jan 26, 2011 10:56 am
 
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Noxubee Part 3 Oktoc Creek

ENTS, On my next visit to NNWR I explored along and around Oktoc Creek located on the eastern edge of the refuge. It is south of the Trail of Big Trees where I reported from a couple of years ago. I crossed over on a small bridge and followed a trail east along the north side of the creek. There are numerous Red Oaks, Willow Oaks, Cypress, Sweet gums, Over cup Oaks, Swamp Chestnut Oaks, etc., in the 120’ range along Oktoc. I also measured a Persimmon, and saw some nice Shagbark Hickory. At one point the water was so low I was able to go down into it and measured a nice Cypress, CBH-18’ 4”, Height-93’, and a Cypress Knee to 6’ 7”, my tallest to date. After spending an hour or two here I decided to head back and go along the western side of the bridge. The terrain here was much different with a small ridge that followed the creek for several hundreds of yards. I saw numerous Oaks, Cypress, Hickory, Pines, Persimmon, Hornbeam, and Holly, some Oak and Pines in the 120’ range. I measured a nice Cherry bark Oak to CBH-12’2”, Height-120, Shagbark, CBH-5' 4", Height-96', Over cup Oak, CBH-11’ 7” Height-112’, Holly CBH-3’8”, Height-66’ a best for me, Persimmon, CBH-4’2”, Height-90’, another best and a Hornbeam, CBH-3’4”, Height-45’ another best! On the way out I found a young grove of Tulips on the ridge top south of the creek. A very pristine place as is most of the refuge with many large trees and wildlife. Lat and Long N 33 15.837 W 88 44.195. Larry
by Larry Tucei
Fri Jan 28, 2011 9:50 pm
 
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Early Spring in Southern Ms.

ENTS, The tempertures have been in the upper 60's and reached 72 today, with 70's forecast for the next few days. Maple trees are starting to leaf out. Some flowers are starting to come out also. I'll get some photos this weekend. Larry
by Larry Tucei
Fri Feb 18, 2011 8:29 pm
 
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Live Oak Cedar Stump

ENTS, I saw a young Live Oak growing from a Cedar tree stump this weekend. I thought it was cool. With death there is also new life. This is in the Biloxi Ms., Cemetery. The Cemetery has many big Live Oaks but none large enough to make the listing. Hurricane Katrina brought some but there are still many more. Larry
by Larry Tucei
Tue May 17, 2011 12:25 pm
 
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