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There be HWA free Hemlocks

Hey everyone I know that it as been a while since I posted anything but the wait is worth it. I stopped by Hemlock Cliffs in Hoosier National Forest in Indiana today on my way to Dayton. I didn't find many hemlocks, 3 comfirmed and many (10-20) possibles. I only got close to two of them due to the terrian. The first hemlock isn't big by what everyone else as posted maybe 80' (I couldn't get a height on any due to the hardwoods) but it was my first one. I decided to name this one after Bob as I was thinking of him as I was walking down the trail. The next one I could get to was the largest of all that I saw. This one was 100-120' with a cbh of 7'2". I named this one after Will since he as done so much to save these trees. I didn't see any white fluffy stuff on them either but I should have brought my binoclurs to get a good look.

I'll make out a full report with photos once I get back home and get a chance to download the pics.

Beth
by Beth
Thu Aug 05, 2010 8:07 pm
 
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Grape vine

I was hiking in Germantown Metropark near Germantown, Ohio and I found this grapevine. I didn't have any of my normal measuring equipment with me so I had to use my "hat-tape". The diameter was about 2 "hat-tapes" as seen in the photo. I will post more later as I get through my photos.
146.JPG
My hat is hanging about 4.5 feet up.

Beth
by Beth
Wed Aug 11, 2010 11:47 am
 
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Re: Trees at the 9/11 Memorial

I belong to the International Oak Society and there was a thread on these trees a while back. It was brought up, even in this group, IOS, that you should never have a monoculture of anything. We, the US, have done this in the past. We first lined all of our streets with American Elms then came along Dutch Elm Disease then we lined them with Bradford Pears only to find out that these trees loose major branches in minor winds. The other point that was made was noone knew if they figured in the deep and broad root system that each tree has. The IOS thought it would have been nice to include trees from where the people whom lost their lives but then someone might have been left out, tropical trees. I'm sure there was more that came up but I can't remember.

Beth
by Beth
Wed Dec 21, 2011 12:55 am
 
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Four trees named state champs

First of all I would like to state up front that I have not verified any of the following measurements nor did I write the article. I have copied from the 8th page of the Missouri Conservationist volume 74, issue 11, November 2013.

"The past few months have been active ones for Missouri's State-Champion Tree Program, with four new champions certified.

A tree on St. Louis' Forest Park is the new state-champion cucumber tree, Magnolia acuminata . It stands 76 feet tall and has a spread of 81 feet and a trunk circumference of 11 feet, 10 inches. This species' common name comes from its cucumber-shaped seed pods. Although it is related to the flowering magnolia, its flowers are not showy.

Another new champion, a shingle oak ( Quercus imbricaria ), lives in St. Louis' Bellefontaine Cemetery. It measures 109 feet tall, has a spread of 95 feet and trunk circumference of 14 feet, 6 inches. Bellfontaine Cemetery also is home to Missouri's state-champion American elm.

A black maple ( Acer nigrum ) growing in Cooper County has been declared co-champion for its species. It stands 52 feet tall and has a spread of 67 feet and a trunk circumference of 8 feet, 10 inches. The other champion black maple is on Boone County, on land owned by the University of Missouri.

A tree growing at the Eastwind Community in Ozark County is the new champion black gum tree ( Nyssa sylvatics ). The tree stands 92 feet tall, has a circumference of 104 inches, and a spread of 34 feet. It replaced the old champion black gum, a 109-foot tree on Caney Mountain Consevation Area that was claimed by strong wind in 2012.

Could you have a champion tree on your area? To find out how big a tree must be to qualify, and to learn how to enter a tree in the program, visit mdc.mo.gov/node/4831."

For most of the members in here the last paragraph will not apply to you but I've included it to be through. There is also a nice picture of the cucumber tree along side the article.
by Beth
Wed Oct 30, 2013 7:23 pm
 
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