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Likes Your Post Button

ENTS, WNTS,

Likes Your Post

I added a nee MOD and gave everyone permission to use it. It is much like the "Like" button on Facebook, for those of you familiar with Facebook. There is a button on the upper right corner of the message that vaguely looks like a "Thumbs Up" icon. Just click on it. The "Likes your message" count appearing below the posters name and icon will go up by one, and your name will be added to a list of people who liked the post at the bottom of the message. The button doesn't really do anything more than that. It is just an acknowledgment that the post was read and found interesting. The button doesn't appear on announcements, but should be there for everyone in every post. After you click the thumbs up the icon changes to a thumbs down icon. Clicking again will take away your likes. This in effects allows you to acknowledge you read the post and like it even if you do not have any specific comment to add.


Links to Between the ENTS website and the ENTS BBS

I have been doing some other upgrades to the BBS over the past couple of days. First you may have noticed I placed links on every forum on the BBS to the equivalent index page on the ENTS and WNTS website, and I also placed links on every index page on the websites to the corresponding forum on the BBS so that navigation between the two will be as seamless as possible.


Daily Digest

I also want to encourage people to subscribe to the "Daily Digest" which sends a summary of all of the posts made each day out as a single email to subscribers. In this way you can be sure that you will not miss a post and have an opportunity to see what everyone is talking about even if you do not browse all of the forums. It is a great asset and I want people to use it. The options for the Digest are under the User Control Panel page that can be accessed by clicking on the User Control Panel link at the upper left side of the BBS . Then click on the Digest tab to set your options.

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by edfrank
Sat Mar 27, 2010 5:20 pm
 
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Calvin and Hobbes Go for a Hike

Cute hiking cartoon I made into a 1 minute video:

Jenny

Download with Keepvid

by Jenny
Sat Mar 27, 2010 1:27 pm
 
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Re: Southern Magnolia

This is the state SC Champ at the Governor mansion. The biggest one I know. Wow great post on this trees blows my mind!
Image
Image
by Marcas
Tue Apr 13, 2010 10:52 pm
 
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About: Scientists, Artists, and Naturalists

ENTS,

What I am trying to do with this series is to acknowledge the contributions of various people in the development of our understanding of the forest, the origins of the conservation ethic, and artistic interpretations related to the natural world. I want to encourage others to add people to this collection. There are contemporary people who deserve note. I can think of western tree climbers like Steve Sillet, and Bob Van Pelt. Bob should be mentioned just for the quality of his artwork. Roma Dial and others are exploring the tropical canopies. There are historical figure like Gifford Pinchot. Icons in the advancement of scientific knowledge of the natural world. There are pioneers in the environmental movement. There are nature photographers I admire that influence our perception of the natural world. Some of these include John Shaw and James Brandenburg. There are excellent photographers in our own membership including Miles Lowry and Tim Sullivan. There are people who were involved with the emergence of the old-growth movement in the eastern US like Mary Davis and Rob Messick. There are others around the world whose names I I still do not know.

So if anyone wants to add their own nominees for this ad hoc hall of fame, please feel free to do so. A general introductory note can be found in Wilkipedia for most famous people. Older authors may have some of their works available on http://www.archive.org You can search Youtube for video clips related to that person. Please do not include proprietary or copyrighted material beyond a conservative fair use consideration. Inappropriate entries will be deleted.

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by edfrank
Wed Apr 14, 2010 2:30 pm
 
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National Park in Maine's Unorganized Territories?

I found this interesting amateur (I think) video about the importance of creating a National Park or at the very least a Wilderness in the northern Maine woods - a highly undeveloped part of the state, devoted mostly to logging. It seems like a relatively easy thing to do, why hasn't it happened? (There is only one Wilderness that I know of - The Allagash River Waterway, and one State Park - Baxter.

Also, found an interesting series of videos on some history of northern Maine by the Maine Woods Consortium. http://vimeo.com/user1441486

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O52PcXmtkSU


http://vimeo.com/3819339
by Jenny
Sun Apr 18, 2010 10:00 am
 
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New Growth as Impressionist Painting

As the woods fills out with new growth, I have been experiencing a different type of impression over the last few years. There is a particular period of time when the hillsides transform themselves into an impressionistic painting. First come the splotches of red from the red maples. Next is the iridescent quality of the first poplar leaves. When these two trees reach their peak of this quality, this is when I imagine Monet, Renoir or Cezanne working on a canvas that is more like a half mile high and two miles long. It’s quite a rush.
For those of you who know the woods better than I, are there other trees or greenery that enhance or add to this effect?

Ed Nizalowski
Newark Valley, NY
by edniz
Mon Apr 19, 2010 12:14 pm
 
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Re: Claremont NH

ENTS

Monica and I got a very late start for Claremont, but we did go. As a mix of snow and rain pelted us, Monica and I trekked through the private site. Our time was very limited, so we went straight to the area where the tallest trees grow. I spent my time measuring trees in two ravines. Here are the 9 pines I measured:

Pine# Height Girth

1 147.5 ft
2 150.1 ft
3 155.3 ft
4 157.5 ft
5 159.8 ft
6 162.3 ft
7 162.9 ft
8 164.1 ft 9.4 ft
9 166.2 ft 8.2 ft (tallest known tree in New Hampshire)

There are many 150s on the site, perhaps as many as 70 and I think there are between 8 and 10 160s. I will return in late October to intensively measure the stand. Great site. Tree #8 was climbed by will Blozan back in 2003, I think.

Monica was operating the camera, but something went amiss, so we don't have any images of the tall trees. We'll make up for it in October. The two images I do have show a huge pine near our friend's house. It measures 12.7 feet in girth and is 116.0 feet tall.


NeilasPine.jpg

NeilasPine2.jpg

Bob
by dbhguru
Wed Apr 28, 2010 9:25 pm
 
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Pulsation of Northern lights in Fairbanks (5 April 2010)

Breakup and pulsation of Northern lights in Fairbanks, Alaska (5 April 2010)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hkJXXAcEfWE

Micrometeorologist — April 05, 2010 — Time-lapse movie of the breakup and pulsation of the Northern lights in Fairbanks, Alaska. Nikon D90, SIGMA 10mm F2.8 EX DC Fisheye HSM, 10mm, F/2.8, Manual, ISO3200, 1.6sec, Interval: 2sec. This movie is 10 fps and thus 20 times faster than actual.
BGM: Lords of the Sky - Celestial Aeon Project
http://www.jamendo.com/en/track/26431

License of music
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/
by edfrank
Wed Apr 28, 2010 2:38 pm
 
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Exotic Landscape Trees At Montpelier

ENTS:

During my unfortunately too brief visit to Montpelier recently I did have time to take a few pics of some of the trees planted around the mansion. Here is a selection; First, for Will Blozan especially, who has expressed some love for this species, are three pics of Picea orientalis ("Oriental spruce").

This first is a nicely shaped tree:

DSC00357.gif

The next two pics are of another Oriental spruce from different sides. This tree is forked about 1/3rd up, and then one side forks again:

DSC00361.gif

DSC00359.gif

The next two pics are for Larry (and everyone, of course). Probably the nicest of the exotics on the property were the Deodar cedars. Here are two nice examples, but I don't have pics of the best ones:

DSC00360.gif

DSC00358.gif

There were also a number of cedar of Lebanon, but because the foliage on these was very thin--they seemed to have dropped most of their needles--I didn't take any pics of them. I have to agree with Larry that Deodar cedars are gorgeous trees. And I have heard one report that they are very tough and adaptable, and specifically have considerable drought resistance. They may be the best--or one of the best--exotic conifers for Virginia.

Next is a pic of a Nordmann fir:

DSC00362.gif

The structure of the top of this tree is interesting--it divides and "bushes out." There are nice Nordmanns growing at the VA Arboretum here near Winchester, but these don't bush out at the top. They are a bit younger, however.

I have some planted on my property here and at my timberland. They are doing well. The best fir at the VA Arboretum is A. holophylla, which grows with complete vigor and lushness, as if native. Fir trees are not planted nearly enough here in VA. I have about 8 different species growing here at my place in VA.

Another interesting fir at Montpelier is "Spanish fir,'" A. pinsapo. This tree was very unphotogenic and was not in a good position for a pic. But it was very vigorous and had a rather large trunk--maybe 30" in diameter. A. pinsapo is a very unusual looking fir with short and very thick, stiff, gray-green needles, looking almost cactus-like.

As for Norway spruce--there is nothing remarkable at Montpelier. There are a couple of fairly nice ones, one of which has a featured position next to the visitor center.

--Gaines
by gnmcmartin
Wed Apr 28, 2010 11:04 am
 
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Linville Gorge_Spence Ridge

ENTS,

Early tomorrow morning I leave out with my stepson Brian Lyman and friends, Chris Craig and Smitty Peterson to spend two nights and three days in the Linville Gorge. We will access the gorge via the Spence Ridge Trail. We intend to do some serious fishing since the Linville River is loaded with Smallmouth Bass & Trout. The scenery in the gorge is beautiful though some areas have been hurt by the loss of the hemlocks. The river is some of the roughest water I have ever fished. However I am taking my measuring equipment and I hope to measure a few trees as well. Of course I will have my Camera.

I will give a report on my return. I might check in from my Blackberry phone if I can get service within the gorge. I doubt it.

Check out the pictures. They are from last summers fishing trip in the Linville Gorge.

James
by James Parton
Thu Apr 29, 2010 10:53 pm
 
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World's biggest beaver dam discovered in northern Canada

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beaverdam.jpg
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/unleashed/2010/05/structure-believed-to-be-the-worlds-largest-beaver-dam-located-thanks-to-google.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Unleashedblog+%28L.A.+Unleashed+Blog%29
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World's biggest beaver dam discovered in northern Canada
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20100505/sc_afp/canadascienceenvironmentanimalbeaver

by Michel Comte and Jacques Lemieux Michel Comte And Jacques Lemieux – Wed May 5, 7:46 pm ET

OTTAWA (AFP) – A Canadian ecologist has discovered the world's largest beaver dam in a remote area of northern Alberta, an animal-made structure so large it is visible from space. Researcher Jean Thie said Wednesday he used satellite imagery and Google Earth software to locate the dam, which is about 850 metres (2,800 feet) long on the southern edge of Wood Buffalo National Park
(continued)

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by edfrank
Thu May 06, 2010 10:28 pm
 
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ERUPTION OF EYJAFJALLAJOKULL VOLCANO, ICELAND

ERUPTION OF EYJAFJALLAJOKULL VOLCANO, ICELAND
Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull Volcano burst into life on March 20, 2010. By April 21st, the eruption had quieted, but some ash emissions continued. The volcano resumed vigorous activity in early May.

* http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=43912&src=nha
*** MODIS(Terra) image from May 07, 2010 (Posted on May 07, 2010 6:17 PM)

* http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=43894&src=nha
*** MODIS(Terra) image from May 06, 2010 (Posted on May 06, 2010 4:09 PM)

* http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=43888&src=nha
*** MODIS(Aqua) image from May 04, 2010 (Posted on May 06, 2010 10:55 AM)

* http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=43886&src=nha
*** ALI(EO-1) image from May 04, 2010 (Posted on May 05, 2010 4:37 PM)

* http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=43883&src=nha
*** ALI(EO-1) image from May 02, 2010 (Posted on May 05, 2010 11:27 AM)

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by edfrank
Mon May 10, 2010 7:09 pm
 
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Native Americans as Promoters of Mast and Fruit Trees

I got this from the following website: http://www.indigeneouspeplesissues.com

Native Americans As Active and Passive Promoters of Mast and Fruit Trees in the Eastern USA

Marc D. Abrams, Gregory J. Nowacki, 2008

We reviewed literature in the fields of anthropology, archaeology, ethnobotany, palynology and ecology to try to determine the impacts of Native Americans as active and passive promoters of mast (nuts and acorns) and fruit trees prior to European settlement. Mast was a critical resource for carbohydrates and fat calories and at least 30 tree species and genera were used in the diet of Native Americans, the most important being oak (Quercus), hickory (Carya) and chestnut (Castanea), which dominated much of the eastern forest, and walnut (Juglans) to a lesser extent. Fleshy tree fruits were most accessible in human-disturbed landscapes, and at least 20 fruit- and berry-producing trees were commonly utilized by Native Americans. They regularly used fire and tree girdling as management tools for a multitude of purposes, including land clearing, promotion of favoured mast and fruit trees, vegetation control and pasturage for big-game animals. This latter point also applies to the vast fire-maintained prairie region further west. Native Americans were a much more important ignition source than lightning throughout the eastern USA, except for the extreme Southeast. First-hand accounts often mention mast and fruit trees or orchards in the immediate vicinity of Native American villages and suggest that these trees existed as a direct result of Indian management, including cultivation and planting. We conclude that Native American land-use practices not only had a profound effect on promoting mast and fruit trees but also on the entire historical development of the eastern oak and pine forests, savannas and tall-grass prairies. Although significant climatic change occurred during the Holocene, including the `Mediaeval Warming Period’ and the `Little Ice Age’, we attribute the multimillennia domination of the eastern biome by prairie grasses, berry-producing shrubs and/or mast trees primarily to regular burning and other forms of management by Indians to meet their gastronomic needs. Otherwise, drier prairie and open woodlands would have converted to closed-canopy forests and more mesic mast trees would have succeeded to more shade-tolerant, fire-sensitive trees that are a significantly inferior dietary resource.


Read more about Native Americans As Active and Passive Promoters of Mast and Fruit Trees in the Eastern USA - Indigenous Peoples Issues and Resources

Ed Nizalowski
Newark Valley, NY
by edniz
Sun May 09, 2010 10:23 pm
 
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Origin of Flowers and Angiosperms

Insight Into Evolution Of First Flowers
ScienceDaily (May 19, 2009)
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090518172453.htm

http://www.sciencedaily.com/images/2009/05/090518172453.jpg

The flower is one of the key innovations of evolution, responsible for a massive burst of evolution that has resulted in perhaps as many as 400,000 angiosperm species. Before flowering plants emerged, the seed-bearing plant world was dominated by gymnosperms, which have cone-like structures instead of flowers and include pine trees, sago palms and ginkgos. Gymnosperms first appeared in the fossil record about 360 million years ago. The new study provides insight into how the first flowering plants evolved from pre-existing genetic programs found in gymnosperms and then developed into the diversity of flowering plants we see today.

Researchers don't know exactly which gymnosperms gave rise to flowering plants, but previous research suggests some genetic program in the gymnosperms was modified to make the first flower, Soltis said. A pine tree produces pine cones that are either male or female, unlike flowers, which contain both male and female parts. But a male pine cone has almost everything that a flower has in terms of its genetic wiring. Continued...

1.Chanderbali et al. Transcriptional signatures of ancient floral developmental genetics in avocado (Persea americana; Lauraceae). Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2009; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0811476106

Mutation Over 100 Million Years Ago Led Flowers to Make Male and Female Parts Differently
ScienceDaily (Oct. 19, 2010)
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101018163100.htm

Research by University of Leeds plant scientists has uncovered a snapshot of evolution in progress, by tracing how a gene mutation over 100 million years ago led flowers to make male and female parts in different ways.

In a number of plants, the gene involved in making male and female organs has duplicated to create two, very similar, copies. In rockcress (Arabidopsis), one copy still makes male and female parts, but the other copy has taken on a completely new role: it makes seed pods shatter open. In snapdragons (Antirrhinum), both genes are still linked to sex organs, but one copy makes mainly female parts, while still retaining a small role in male organs -- but the other copy can only make male.

1.Chiara A. Airoldi, Sara Bergonzi, Brendan Davies. Single amino acid change alters the ability to specify male or female organ identity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2010; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1009050107

Flowering Plants Evolved Very Quickly Into Five Groups
ScienceDaily (Nov. 27, 2007)
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071126170900.htm

Based on the Soltises' and their collaborators' research in previous years, it was known that flowering plants split into three branches shortly after they appeared about 130 million years ago. That process was relatively gradual, at least compared with the rapid radiation that happened next. The details of that radiation have long been murky. The latest research clears the picture by showing that all plants fall into five major lineages that developed over the relatively short period of 5 million years, or possibly even less.


South Pacific Plant May Be Missing Link In Evolution Of Flowering Plants
ScienceDaily (May 17, 2006)
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/05/060517181205.htm

A new University of Colorado at Boulder study involving a "living fossil plant" that has survived on Earth for 130 million years suggests its novel reproductive structure may be a "missing link" between flowering plants and their ancestors.

[url]The Amborella plant, found in the rain forests of New Caledonia in the South Pacific, has a unique way of forming eggs that may represent a critical link between the remarkably diverse flowering plants, known as angiosperms, and their yet to be identified extinct ancestors, said CU-Boulder Professor William "Ned" Friedman.

"The study shows that the structure that houses the egg in Amborella is different from every other flowering plant known, and may be the potential missing link between flowering plants and their progenitors."

In basic terms, Amborella has one extra sterile cell that accompanies the egg cell in the female part of its reproductive apparatus known as the embryo sac, according to the study. The discovery of the unique configuration of the egg apparatus, which is thought to be a relic of intense evolutionary activity in early angiosperm history, "is akin to finding a fossil amphibian with an extra leg," according to a May 18 Nature perspective piece accompanying Friedman's article.[/url]

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by edfrank
Thu Oct 21, 2010 3:24 pm
 
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North Syracuse Oak Groves

ENTS,

In the past few weeks I’ve made more measurements in the both North Syracuse oak groves with the Forestry 550. The wide crowns of the oaks make the highest twigs difficult to find, and I’ve had to make several measurements of each tree in an attempt to reach the highest points. Leaf fall has made this easier, and I’ve gotten some very good shots at the crowns of the oaks. These oaks turn out to be several feet taller than previously measured. It has been exceptionally beautiful in the oaks groves this month, especially on bright sunny days like Sat. 11/13, with the sun illuminating the radiant brown to bronze leaves of the oaks. In glorious weather like on 11/13 there is no place I’d rather be than in these beloved old oak groves I’ve known so many years.

Here are some of the results. In the Wizard of Oz Memorial Oak Grove:
Einstein White Oak 111 ft.
White Oak just south of Einstein 110 ft. 25.6” dbh
White Oak #11 109 ft. 27.2” dbh
White Oak #4 105 ft.
White Oak north of dead Disney Black Oak 104 ft.
Black Oak at southeast corner of grove 101 ft. 29.6” dbh
Red Maple in southeast part of grove 104 ft. 25.2” dbh
Numbers on these trees refer to the brochure on this grove that Robert Henry and I developed in 2006.

One of the hardest trees in the grove to measure is the grove’s sole large White Pine in the northeastern section. From the south where I’ve tried to measure it in the past, the canopy is too dense to get a clear shot at the crown. On 11/14 I measured it from the north and got a clear shot and found that this old (it has old platy bark) White Pine is 103 feet tall (dbh is 31.3”).

In the northeast corner the same day I measured the grove’s only Cottonwood, a slender tree, to 99 feet. The addition of the Cottonwood and the more accurate height of the White Pine have caused the grove’s Rucker Index to go up dramatically.

Here are the new Rucker Height Indices for the Wizard of Oz Oak Grove:
Rucker 10: cbh(ft.) Height(ft.)
White Oak 7.9 115
Red Maple 4.8 110
Red Oak 12.5 108
White Pine 8.2 103
Black Oak 9.8 102
Cottonwood N/A 99
Black Cherry 5.7 96.5
Black Gum 5.2 94.5
Beech 5.3 90
Sassafras 4.7 75.5

Rucker 10 (20101114) 99.35
Rucker 5:

White Oak 7.9 115
Red Maple 4.8 110
Red Oak 12.5 108
White Pine 8.2 103
Black Oak 9.8 102

Rucker 5 (20101114) 107.6

Revised Historic Rucker 10 (as of 11/14/2010):

White Oak 7.9 115
Red Maple 4.8 110
Red Oak 12.5 108
White Pine 8.2 103
Black Oak 9.8 102
Black Cherry 2.9 100
Cottonwood N/A 99
Black Gum 5.2 94.5
Beech 5.3 90
Sassafras 4.7 75.5

Historic Rucker 10 99.7

Revised Historic Rucker 5:

White Oak 7.9 115
Red Maple 4.8 110
Red Oak 12.5 108
White Pine 8.2 103
Black Oak 9.8 102

Historic Rucker 5 107.6

In the North Syracuse Cemetery Oak Grove where over 21 rugged old oaks are crowded into little over an acre, I got new and greater heights for these old trees that I’ve known since early childhood. On 11/13 in the bright mild sun and under a crystal blue sky the oak grove was like a palace of light with the remaining leaves on the oaks glowing like lamps. Words don’t do justice to a place like this on a day like this. I could tell the individual trees apart by the color of their leaves as each tree in this grove, even though most are White Oaks, has its own color, and some of the oaks had already lost most of their leaves. This ability to distinguish the individual trees made measuring on this day easier than at any other time. Numbers on this trees refer to the brochure Robert Henry and I developed about this grove in 1999.
Here are some of the updated figures for the North Syracuse Cemetery Oak Grove:
White Oak #10 103 ft. 38.3” dbh
White Oak #16 106 ft. 31.1” dbh
White Oak #22 106 ft. 21” dbh
White Oak #23 109 ft. 31.1” dbh – I’m not convinced I’ve reached the top on this tree and it could be as much as 112 ft. tall.
White Oak #24 109 ft. 24.4" dbh
White Oak #25 107 ft. 23” dbh
Red Oak #13 99.5 ft. 31.2” dbh (this tree has an old age celery top crown like in Neil Pederson’s article)
Red Oak #26 102 ft. 30.8” dbh – crown regenerated after 1994 storm breakage
Black Oak #27 105 ft. 45.8” dbh – the grove’s largest tree, possibly 2nd tallest Black Oak in NY (the tallest I know of in ENTS records in NY is 106.3 ft. on Welwyn Preserve on Long Island measured in 2004).

I know that these heights are not great compared to the fabulous new heights coming out of Ohio and other places, but for a flat area like North Syracuse at this latitude they are extraordinary.

As I’m sure you all know, there has been very little action from upstate NY. There are some exceptional sites up here but my means are very limited. I do not have a vehicle nor can I afford to get one. Thus, I cannot easily get to sites like Green Lakes which has the tallest trees in central NY. As far as I know, no ENT has been at Green Lakes with a laser rangefinder since 2002. And there is Zoar Valley where so many exceptionally tall trees were found in 2003, including the 156 ft. Tuliptree. I don’t think any trees have been measured there since 2005. And there is Lily Dale in Chautauqua County with Black Cherries over 130 ft., White Pine over 145 ft.
There are so many sites up here that beg to be measured. The tallest tree in NY that I know of is a White Pine at Elders Grove in the Adirondacks at a little over 158 ft. Are there taller trees in NY than that? Could there be 160 ft. White Pines in the Adirondacks, 160 ft. Tuliptrees on Long Island?

An ENTS gathering at Green Lakes (where in 2002 Tuliptrees were measured to 144.7 ft.) would be a great idea for spring 2011

Tom Howard
by tomhoward
Wed Nov 17, 2010 10:20 pm
 
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Congaree National Park

ENTS,

A couple of weeks ago my dad and I made a trip to Congaree National Park to measure some trees we had found a few years ago and to measure some champion trees. The morning started out cool with a thick fog that added to the mystery of the area. Except for a few deer, animals were scarcely seen.

DSCF0375.jpg

The first tree measured was the state champion water tupelo. This tree is only about 50 yards off of the kingsnake trail. It has a broken top that probably broke out decades or even a century ago.
113.1’X 19’1”
Average crown spread 41’ Max 48’
DSCF0378.jpg

Our next target was the former state champion laurel oak. This tree was replaced by the one Marcas, Jess, and Will found a few years ago.
115.8’ X 17’10”
Average crown spread 110’ Max 121.5’
IMGP0011.jpg

Next we followed a gut that paralled the oakridge trail a few hundred yards away. I measured a laurel oak to 126.9’ and a nearby swamp chestnut oak had a cbh of 15’ 6.5”. One of the most impressive trees we saw was a loblolly pine 13.5’ cbh that had been hit by lightning this summer. The smell of pine resin filled the air around the tree.
IMGP0013.jpg

I somehow missed a huge sweetgum that was found in 2008.I had intended to get a height measurement to go along with its 16’ cbh. I did measure five or six other sweetgums all in between 120-130’.

With some time left we headed for the Hampton Cypress to get some cypress knee data. The grove that contains the Hampton Cypress is very impressive old growth. Several cypress trees are 5-7ft in diameter.The Hampton Cypress has a large knee growing near it. It measures 6’ 7” tall with a cbh of 3’6” and a circumference at 1’ of 7’ 2”.
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IMGP0026.jpg
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IMGP0029.jpg
IMGP0042.jpg

Tyler
by Tyler
Sun Dec 19, 2010 7:49 pm
 
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East Barkers Creek

Probably best known as a source of gemstones, the Cowee Mountains are small section of the crumpled mass of earth’s crust that makes up western North Carolina. They lie south and west of larger, higher mountain ranges, the Great Smokies and the Great Balsams. The higher peaks range between 4000 and 5000’ elevation with a degree of ruggedness typical of the southern Appalachians.

LiDAR indicates most cove forests of the Cowees are smaller in stature than those of the Smokies and some other nearby mountain ranges. Sites with canopies peaking above 150’ are unusual, and the aerial data identifies only three sites with hits exceeding 160’. However, one of those, a small, northeast facing cove in the East Barkers Creek watershed, has a continuous high canopy with one 176’ cell. The anomalously high LiDAR model suggests that, for the Cowees, the cove is some combination of unusually rich and unusually old. Those qualities made the site a high priority for groundtruthing.

After a call to the Forest Service dispelled their fears that recent timber sales in the watershed had included the target cove, Will Blozan, Michael Davie, Josh Kelly, and Jess Riddle set out on a cool, gray, New Year’s eve to visit the cove. We coaxed a compact car up a steep dirt road, saturated by melting snow, that wound through the recent housing development bordering Forest Service land. As we neared our destination, the forests lining the road appeared rich but young, less than 60 years old, and we were surprised by the steepness of the slopes. After asking permission to park, we ascended a cove that Forest Service records identified as originating in 1870 and laid adjacent to our target cove. Old logging roads criss-crossed the cove, and while obviously much younger than hoped for, the forest showed signs of high growth potential. We noted an abundance of sweet cicely, an herb typical of rich sites, and were further encouraged by several bitternut hickories, again typical of sites with good moisture and nutrient supply. At the cove’s upper end, several well formed northern red oaks already reached approximately 3’ in diameter and about 130’ tall.

IMG_6804_20_1.JPG

An old road crossed a steep ridge into our target cove and put us in position to measure our way down through the high canopy area. Above the road, a mix of tuliptree, white ash, basswood, and black cherry, often draped with dutchmans pipe vine, grew out of the rocky upper cove. Below the road, the cove descended at a moderate slope, and steep side slopes nearly meet each other to make the cove ravine like. Tuliptrees dominated the cove to such an extent that few trees of other species had been able to survive, and those that had leaned, twisted, and contorted their way towards old canopy gaps. The understory and shrub layers also showed little variety, only yellow buckeye and wild hydrangea were common, but the herbaceous layer likely contributes substantial diversity. What we could see of the herb layer was a mix of widely distributed mesic site species like Christmas fern and intermediate wood fern, and rich site species like sweet cicely and large bellflower. Among those grows at least one uncommon species characteristic of very rich soils, goldies fern, which also occurs under the 180’ tuliptree on Bradley Fork in the Smokies and in the exceptional second growth tuliptree stand at Joyce Kilmer.

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From the road bed in the upper cove, the tuliptrees did not strike us as looking especially tall. Their tops were just starting to gnarl, and the grove was not particularly dense. Given their somewhat exposed position and the relatively open stand, they seemed to suggest that more sheltered parts of the cove might support exceptional trees, but that the most productive parts of the cove were still below us. Starting to measure them, however, we quickly realized that the trees were taller than they appeared, and that we had already reached the upper end of the prime area. The first measurements came in at over 170’. Seeing a denser forest of tall tulips farther down the center of the cove, we divided up tasks: Will and Mike did most of the measuring, while Josh collected coordinates and Jess measured circumferences and provided targets on the bases. The goal quickly became to measure all the 170’ tuliptrees. By the time we reached the boundary of private land, which coincided with younger forest and the end of the tall trees, we had seen 16 tuliptrees over 170’, including three over 180’.

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The unprecedented density of tall tuliptrees left us all slightly stunned. The LiDAR data promised an impressive cove, but this stand exceeded our expectations. Of all known sites, this cove contains the second most tuliptrees over 170’ tall (Baxter Creek has 22) and as many 180’ trees as any known site in eastern North America. All of those trees grow in a narrow strip less than two acres in area. More accurate measurements of the Deep Creek tuliptrees will determine where the site’s tallest tree ranks among tuliptrees and among all eastern hardwoods. Second tallest seems likely, and the tree is certainly the tallest known second growth hardwood in eastern North America. We do not know what the stand’s eventual limits will be. Based on crown structure and bark, the even aged tuliptrees appear to be between 85 and 120 years old. Some of the trees have densely branched upper limbs and somewhat rounded crowns indicating they continue upward only slowly. However, the tallest tree does not fork until about 30’ below the top, and maintains strong apical dominance. This remarkable stand would have remained unknown to us without LiDAR data; adjacent private land discourages casually poking around in the area, and the more visible young forest that surround the stand only hint at the area’s potential. To better understand this grove’s productivity, we feel the trees, surrounding plants, and soils deserve further research.

Jess Riddle, Will Blozan, Michael Davie, and Josh Kelly
by Jess Riddle
Sat Jan 08, 2011 6:56 pm
 
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Salmon River

WNTS, ENTS:
For the past several years Susan and I have gathered up some friends and organized a western river trip. This years target was the Salmon River in Idaho. The section we had a permit to do was for an 85-mile section between Corn Creek and Vinegar Creek. The river is in the federal Wild and Scenic system with the section we are doing is as classified wild and flows through the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness administered by the Forest Service.
See the following links:
http://www.rivers.gov/wsr-salmon-main.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salmon_River_%28Idaho%29

The last week of August 2010 we took off with the first stop in Idaho at the Mike Harris Campground in the Caribou-Targhee National Forest near the town of Victor in Teton County. Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta Douglas var. latifolia) was plentiful with the largest measured at 4.1’ CBH and 111.1’ height. Elevation was at 6500’
Next stop was the Corn Creek Ranger Station and Campground where 10 of us would meet with the rangers and rig our boats for a 7 day - 84-mile river trip. We had 2 rafts, 2 catarafts, 1 IK, I kayak and a C-1. Corn Creek is where the road ends and is 46 river miles downstream of the town of North Fork and 8 miles downstream of the confluence of the Middle Fork. While driving along the river to our put-in we stopped to admire this herd of Elk.
http://straycat.smugmug.com/Travel/Main-Salmon-River-2010/i-dzZv3P2/0/M/P1000448-M.jpg
Photo by Tom Connelly
While admiring the Elk a local person stopped and relayed the fact that in the 20 years he has driven this road it has only been in the last two that Elk would come down at this low elevation at this time of year. He believes it is because a newly established wolf pack has kept them on the move. There were over 100 head in this herd with several large bulls which are out of the picture to right after leading across the river.
Corn Creek is in Lemhi County 2900’ elevation. We would take out at the Carey Creek Boat Ramp in Valley County at 1900 elevation. This section has about 25 named rapids and as many unnamed. At low summer flows, it is considered class II –III+ run .
The enabling legislation for this wilderness area “grandfathered” in many activities that are incompatible to wilderness areas such as airstrips, pack bridges, dude ranches and horrors upon horrors - jet boat traffic. It also appears many of the rapids had been “improved” by blasting clear channels for transportation.
Near the ranger station and campground the two largest Ponderosa pines (Pinus ponderosa var. scopulorum) were measured at 11.9’ CBH and 119.8’ height and 7.1’ CBH and 122.5’. Also measured a Blue Elderberry (Sambucus nigra L. ssp. cerulea) at 1.7’ and 21.8’
Fruit of Elderberry
http://straycat.smugmug.com/Trees/Sambucus-nigra-ssp-cerulea/i-86Cj5f7/0/M/DSC5621-M.jpg
Photo by Carol Pamer
Day 1. We had the only swim of the trip at Ranier Rapid when the IK capsized. Camping was at Upper Devil’s Teeth (mile 12.0) on river right. Measured a nice Ponderosa Pine near the camping area at 11.9’ and 135.0’.
Day 2. The first order of business was to run Devil’s Teeth Rapid, which was right below our campsite. It was not a hard rapid but it claimed Susan’s camera when she left it unattached while rowing through the rapid. I pulled the same trick several years ago. We scouted Salmon Falls from river right. All ran with no problems but I forgot to look for relict populations of Grand Fir and Pacific Yew. We stopped at the Hot Springs on river left, which required a scramble up a slippery rock slope to enjoy a nice long soak in the enhanced rock pool with flowing hot water and a view.
http://straycat.smugmug.com/Travel/Main-Salmon-River-2010/i-39pr79m/0/M/P1000575-M.jpg
Photo by Tom Connelly
Pictured from left is Turner Sharp, Susan Sharp, John Fichtner, Kathleen Simpson, Tom Connelly, Bridget Tincher, Ron Bucholtz, Carol Pamer, Ed Gertler
It was hard to leave this spot but we had miles to go. Camping was at Hancock Beach (mile 25.9) river left. Measured a Ponderosa Pine at 7.6’ and 129.6’.
http://straycat.smugmug.com/Travel/Main-Salmon-River-2010/DSC00598/1093958388_8wzig-M.jpg
Photo by John Fichtner
Notice the evidence of fire. I would estimate 75 percent of the area we saw have been burnt in last 20 years.
Day 3. Scouted Bailey’s Rapid from river right. Two of us messed it up but no flips. Camped at Lower Yellow Pine Bar (mile 36.7) river right. This gave us a good view of Big Mallard Rapid. I measured a Rocky Mountain Doug-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca)at 6.1’ and 111.2’ and a Ponderosa Pine at 7.5’ and 114.2’
http://straycat.smugmug.com/Travel/Main-Salmon-River-2010/DSC00628/1094337224_RKDMh-M.jpg
Photo by Turner Sharp
Pictured is Tom Connelly , John Fichtner
Day 4. Only one boat messed up at Big Mallard but no flip. We stopped at the Buckskin Bill Museum at Five Mile Bar. Some of us got beer and ice cream. Bill died in 1980; a German couple bought the property, developed the museum, and lives here year round. Camped at Bluebird Hole (mile 53.7) river right
Day 5. This was a lay over day with a late breakfast. Various hikes from camp scared up a rattlesnake, some Big Horn Sheep,lots of bear scat but no bears, some Mule Deer, plenty of Chukars and one big Ponderosa. The river terraces had plenty evidence of pit homes made by the original inhabitants.
Sorry I did get any measurements of this tree but I was informed it was equal or slightly larger then the biggest on at Corn Creek.
http://straycat.smugmug.com/Trees/Pinus-ponderosa/IMG0371/1186270095_aV9Mk-M.jpg
Photo by Tom Connelly
Pictured Bridget Tincher

http://straycat.smugmug.com/Travel/Main-Salmon-River-2010/i-cRRKrp4/0/M/IMGP2193-M.jpg
Photo by Bridget Tincher
This view is looking west and downstream. It illustrates the north bank with a southern exposure is mostly grassland with some scattered Ponderosa Pines and the more heavily timbered south bank with a northern exposure.
Typical white sand beach camping area with a fish filled pool.
http://straycat.smugmug.com/Travel/Main-Salmon-River-2010/DSC00589/1093940824_sp6qZ-M.jpg
Photo by John Fichtner
Measured a Doug-fir on a river terrace about 100’ above the Campground at 6.6’ and 78.0’
Day 6. When we pulled away from the previous night camped we encountered this herd of Big Horn Sheep.
http://straycat.smugmug.com/Travel/Main-Salmon-River-2010/i-sJm4Vz8/0/M/DSC5675-M.jpg
Photo by Carol Pamer
Camped at T-Bone Creek (mile 71.6) river right and measured a Douglas-fir at 9.0 and 113.5’ and a Ponderosa Pine 6.1’ and 102.2’
Day 7. We pulled out at the Carey Creek Boat Ramp, several miles below Vinegar Creek and about 25 miles upriver from the town of Riggins. We de-rigged and somehow stuffed all our gear into vehicles and made it to Riggins to one of the wonders of the world, an automatic “groover “cleaner. All human waste must be carried down the river to be disposed of in sewer system. Recently several areas have installed what is essentially a large dishwasher that can dump multiple containers of human waste and go through a wash and rinse cycle making a distasteful job almost bearable. The first time we came across one it so impressed us that we had our picture taken with it.
Had a leisurely dinner in Riggins and headed to our reserved campsite (Swinging Bridge) in the Boise National forest near Banks Idaho. Enroute, I intended to measure several large Ponderosa Pines in the State Park near McCall Idaho. The CBH were 14.5’ and 13.7’ but we had dawdled over dinner and drinks to long and it was to dark to take height readings.
The swinging Bridge campground elevation was at 3300’ was a much wetter site. Measured a Doug-fir at 11.4’ and 147.5’
http://straycat.smugmug.com/Travel/Main-Salmon-River-2010/DSC00670/1094360303_G4z4o-M.jpg
Photo by John Fichtner
Pictured Turner Sharp
One of our party had not had his fill of paddling and was off to a self-supported solo paddle in his C-1. His goal was to do the Yellowstone River from the Park to it confluence with the Missouri. I believe he made the 550 miles in 20 days not counting his shuttle time. Several of the others were flying out of Salt Lake City so we camped on Antelope Island in the Great Salt Lake. There are no trees but it is really a unique experience to camp there and I highly recommend it. For more information on see the following links:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antelope_Island_State_Park
http://www.stateparks.com/ponderosa.html

Typical view on Antelope Island
http://straycat.smugmug.com/Travel/Main-Salmon-River-2010/i-v4FfLDT/0/M/IMG0461-M.jpg
by tsharp
Mon Feb 14, 2011 12:52 am
 
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Beaver Pond Forest: Retired Algonquin Chief Robert Lovelace

Latest :
Beaver Pond Forest: Retired Algonquin Chief Robert Lovelace Speaks Out at the Closing Ceremony of the Sacred Fire Queen's Park, Steve Hulaj, 14 February 2011
on 2011/2/14 3:10:00 (68 reads)

Beaver Pond Forest: Retired Algonquin Chief Robert Lovelace Speaks Out at the Closing Ceremony of the Sacred Fire Queen's Park
Steve Hulaj
13 February 2011 at 23:13


This letter should change everyone. It's why we did this...


This is an Incredible Letter from Retired Algonquin Chief Robert Lovelace - which was read today at Queens Park at the closing ceremony of the Sacred Fire - the 1st EVER fire at the Provincial Legislature. It burned 24/7 until this afternoon. Thank you Robert for it.
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"It is hard to see the clear-cutting of the Beaver Pond Forest in Ottawa. It is hard because so many good people have tried their best to prevent it. It is hard because this forest has a spirit. The Life in the Forest called out to those good people to help save the trees, the forest life, and the ancestral connection that it has with the Algonquin people.

But it is being clear-cut. Men, for wages, are felling the trees with dispassionate machines, piling the trees for processing, insuring that every last morsel is committed to profit. And then the ground itself will be pushed into piles, scraped into roads, excavated for foundations and sewers. This old growth forest, the archeological story it holds and the serenity it offered will be gone soon. But we have not lost this struggle.

We have not lost the struggle. The struggle to save the Beaver Pond Forest has united heroic people who understand their common concerns for mother earth. This struggle has educated us to the complexities of the battle to save the earth and as we learn we become stronger. Now is the time to renew and extend our efforts to change the culture of greed and exploitation to a culture of mutual respect for human needs and non-interference with the replenishing mechanisms and cycles of the earth.

Those who opposed us in this struggle did so out of greed, arrogance and political cowardice. Too many times, single-minded developers have taken our common heritage and turned it into market commodities, killed the natural spirit of the land, and created landscapes of self-interest, conspicuous consumption and unsustainable depreciation. Too many times, politicians promise to extend the power of the people but simply acquiesce to the power of money. Throughout this battle the real heroic people have stood together against this kind of tyranny and they will continue to work together to create change and real democracy. It is time to take back the commons from those who have corrupted both our lands and governance.

As we watch the destruction of this beautiful Forest we owe it to each other to continue to fight for every piece of mother earth. Refuse to surrender another inch.

Restore the land, its natural functions and the creatures that abide by its natural laws. Restore your own relationship with the land in how you live, where you live, what you eat, how you use energy and in your relationships with one another. And when we struggle together in the face of greed, arrogance and cowardice: heal yourself from the harm, heal others in a good way and pick yourself up and struggle again. “We shall overcome”.

Robert Lovelace
February 13, 2011
Queen’s Park
Toronto, Ontario
by edfrank
Mon Feb 14, 2011 6:09 pm
 
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Albany Pine Bush - Obligatory Video

Nice video of my one day at the Albany Pine Bush pine barrens...well, pine and snow barrens. return visit was attempted during a blizzard and that didn't exactly work out...

A better quality video than vimeo is here: http://gallery.me.com/jennifdudley#100530

But this is the vimeo:

http://vimeo.com/20445697
by Jenny
Sun Feb 27, 2011 8:48 pm
 
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Pine Island

ENTS,

Pine Island, also known as Hurricane Island, is located a little over a mile west of the low boardwalk at Congaree National Park. For this trip my dad and I made our way west along Cedar Creek until we came to the island. On the way we encountered large cypress trees lining the creek. The larger trees ranged from 13'-22' cbh and 110'-120' in height.

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The tallest tree I measured in this area was a cypress at 130.1' on the opposite side of the creek. I also measured the spread of a large cypress to 84'.

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We then came to Pine Island. I spotted a tall loblolly at the edge of the island and quickly measured it to 151'.

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Loblolly Pines range from scattered individuals to dense stands on Pine Island. We came to an area with three loblollies over 14'cbh growing near each other. Near these was a large loblolly blown over likely during a summer storm last year.

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We visited a couple of pine groves that were a little farther away from the others. These turned out to contain the tallest trees measured all day.

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In summary Pine Island contains many large and tall loblolly pines. The 163.8' pine is the tallest tree I have ever measured. Many trees were roughed in the 140'-150' range and it is possible there may be taller trees present.

Tyler
by Tyler
Sun Mar 06, 2011 12:58 pm
 
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Living Blue Ridge by Casablanca Digital Media

Living Blue Ridge by Casablanca Digital Media

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZaqXmBSstv0&feature=player_embedded#at=36[/youtube]

Uploaded by marilyn4uandme on Mar 5, 2011

Western North Carolina--by Chris Cassels and Casablanca Digital Media in Asheville, NC

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by edfrank
Thu Mar 10, 2011 12:43 pm
 
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Island Among Stars

Island Among Stars

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/03/pictures/110311-best-space-pictures-milky-way-bow-shock-shuttle-sauron-135/?source=link_fb20110312spacepictures

space135-milky-way-3d-panorama_33159_600x450.jpg
Panoramic photograph courtesy Luc Perrot

Like a page torn from The Little Prince, the French island of Réunion becomes a small planet amid a starry sky in a composite picture taken last week by astrophotographer Luc Perrot.

The picture is what's called a stereographic projection, a form of digital processing that shows a 360-degree spherical panorama as a flat image. This view stitches together several long-exposure shots of the night sky—including the arc of the Milky Way—as seen from the tiny volcanic island, east of Madagascar.

Published March 11, 2011
by edfrank
Sat Mar 12, 2011 11:23 pm
 
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Tallest Hemlock Discovery 2011 / 80m+

Just discovered a new tallest hemlock day before yesterday.

My estimate was 272 feet from a solo measure around noon on March 12. Sillett happened to be in the park that same day, and Taylor the next, so it got measured twice.

Edit - Fixed Link .... http://www.mdvaden.com/hemlock_tallest.shtml

The name is Tsunami
by mdvaden
Tue Mar 15, 2011 2:21 am
 
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cron