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Re: Rocky River floodplain forest

Bob-

I hope we can hook up in June--there are several sites within 30 minutes of the Ohio Turnpike that are worth visiting.

I returned to the Rocky River floodplain today, with oldest son Mitch; found some more species at good size and larger individuals of species previously reported, which brings the R.I. to 120' plus---not bad for a level site in northern Ohio. The tallest/largest tree measured today was a tulip at 136' by 14' 2''. It's a very rich woods with a lot of understory, especially spicebush, which get up to 20' , and Ohio buckeye, to about 65'. There are still more areas to explore and it's close-by, so Ill add to the site report as I can. list.jpg Tulip-tree 136' Tulip-tree 136 x 14- 2.jpg Tulip-tree top Tulip-tree 136 x 14- 2 top.jpg Mitch by 119.5' bur oak Mitch by bur oak.jpg

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Sat Mar 27, 2010 11:13 pm
 
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Re: Southern Magnolia

Marc-

I have both Edith Bogue and Bracken's Brown Beauty in my yard in the Cleveland area, and I would say they are equally hardy. Edith has larger flowers and foliage but is also more prone to snow-load damage. Bracken's has a wavy leaf margin like a Nova Zembla rhododendron.

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Tue Mar 30, 2010 7:50 pm
 
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Seiberling Nature Realm, Summit County Ohio

ENTS-

Today I quickly and briefly visited this park, which was once part of the F. A. Seiberling (Goodyear Tire and Rubber founder) Estate. The park has a very nice interpretive nature center as well as some cultivated grounds, but most of the park is natural forest. The park is contiguous and continuous with Sand Run Metropark, about which Randy Brown and I reported last Fall. The weather was exceptional--in the low 80's and sunny.

As usual in my area, topography determines tree height. I found a nice tulip-tree on top of a ridge at 136.5' x 11' 8''----this is about the best any species in the area will do on high or level ground. A short distance away, starting at the bottom of a deep ravine, another tulip reached 153.7', at what appeared to be a smaller cbh. Farther on down the ravine, a hemlock measured to 140.4'---this is the tallest hemlock in the the northern part of Ohio to my knowledge.

Later when I returned home I examined maps and aerial photos, and I think the 140.4' hemlock is actually on Sand Run Park land, which would push the R.I. for that park to 134'+.
136,5' tulip Tulip 136.jpg 136.5 tulip top Tulip 136 top.jpg
153.7 tulip(center in distance) Tulip 153.jpg
140.4 hemlock Hemlock 140.jpg

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Thu Apr 01, 2010 10:54 pm
 
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Re: Seiberling Nature Realm, Summit County Ohio

Ed-
The shape-shifters have settled for the evening.
Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Thu Apr 01, 2010 11:25 pm
 
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Shale detail

shale detail.jpg
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by Steve Galehouse
Thu Mar 18, 2010 10:26 pm
 
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Re: Hickory Nut Gorge Curiosities

James-

The larch-like tree, if evergreen, has to be a true cedar, Cedrus. If is is in fact deciduous but not a larch, then golden-larch, Pseudolarix amabilis, which has longer foliage and larger cones than a true Larix. The willow is Salix matsudana, an Asian species.

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Wed Apr 07, 2010 10:32 pm
 
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Bacon Woods, Vermilion River valley

ENTS-

Today I stopped at a park area I hadn't visited before, in western Lorain County, Ohio. The Vermilion River flows through the park on its way north to Lake Erie. The woods is a floodplain forest with sycamore, cottonwood, walnut, hackberry, tulip, pin oak, white & green ash, and red maple achieving canopy height, while the understory is mainly Ohio buckeye and box-elder. Big trees were rather scarce, and aesthetically the forest was not so impressive-----except for the very rich herbaceous layer that was truly luxuriant( I hit it at just the right point in the season, I think). Virginia bluebells were extremely frequent, often in colonies of 1/4 acre or larger, and sessile and nodding trilliums were very common as well: Virginia bluebells.jpg Virginia bluebells stand.jpg Sessile trillium.jpg Nodding trillium.jpg
Ostrich ferns were also abundant, with their lush fronds unfurling: Cinnamon fern.jpg

Ohio buckeye brightened the woody understory, with its fully developed foliage and pale yellow flower spikes: Ohio buckeye.jpg

As I said, big trees were rather scarce, but I did manage to find one really nice pin oak, at 122.4' tall and 14' 2'' CBH. This is a beautiful healthy tree with a thick, slow tapering bole, and a great buttressed trunk (which is quite unusual for the species as i know it). This is the largest forest grown pin oak I have encountered. Pin oak.jpg Pin oak top.jpg Pin oak trunk.jpg

Other trees measured included a sycamore at 119.1' x 12' 11'', and a white ash at 111' x 8' 10''. Sadly, most of the ash trees in the park have succumbed to EAB.

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Tue Apr 20, 2010 7:11 pm
 
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Appalachia Red Reddbud

ENTS
I've posted about this cultivar before, but felt the need to post again---this is the most striking variety of redbud in cultivation, IMHOP. The flowers are a neon pink rather than a muddy lavender, selected from a wild tree in Maryland. Photo from my yard attached.
Ap Red.jpg

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Thu Apr 29, 2010 10:53 pm
 
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Bottlebrush buckeye

ENTS-

Bottlebrush buckeye(Aesculus parviflora) is a great SE native shrub. Attached is a photo from one in my yard, flowering about a month before it is expected to.
DSCI1689.JPG


Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Mon Jun 28, 2010 11:22 pm
 
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Re: Up North to Ontario on Tuesday

ENTS-

Here are a few images of the area where we have a couple of cabins---all photos are within the Island Lake Forest and Barrens Conservation Reserve, which is due west of Algonquin Provincial Park. The area was logged around the turn of the last century, and many areas suffered ground fires after logging:
Burned white pine stump.jpg
White pine, hemlock, and white spruce are the largest conifers, while balsam poplar, yellow birch, and sugar maple are the biggest broadleaves.
Betula alleghaniensis with Mitch.jpg
The areas affected by burns and beavers are the most "Boreal" in appearance, with black and white spruce and larch predominating: Beaver country.jpg
Quaking aspen is also common, along with bigtooth aspen---quaking aspen has much whiter bark than bigtooth, but otherwise is very similar: Populus tremuloides.jpg
The shrub layer is dominated by common juniper: Common juniper.jpg . while the herbaceous/subshrub layer has a rich mix of many different genera: Rhexia virginica.jpg Chokeberry and cranberry.jpg

Canoe birch is also very prevalent in second growth areas: Canoe birch.jpg

Can't wait to go back up!
Island Lake clouds.jpg
by Steve Galehouse
Wed Sep 01, 2010 7:44 pm
 
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Up North to Ontario on Tuesday

Ents -

Heading up North Tuesday mit Kinder und Hund ( as well as wife Diane), to a land of granite, pine, spruce, larch and of course lakes. Will report upon return.

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Sat Aug 07, 2010 11:40 pm
 
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Re: Reflections on stillness

Ed, ENTS-

A view from our cabin in Ontario, on a still late afternoon.
still water.jpg


Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Fri Sep 10, 2010 8:23 pm
 
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Re: Reflections on stillness

Don, James, ENTS-

Yes, it's hard to clear the mind, and takes effort---I think most of us are hard-put to get into a reflective, meditative state, but the stillness of nature surely helps. I find it hard to convey stillness photographically without including water, so here is another photo from Up North, taken in the pre-dawn.
Purple haze.jpg

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Sat Sep 11, 2010 10:58 pm
 
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Re: Species ID challenge!

Don-

It's a goosefoot, Chenopodium; looks like Chenopodium capitatum, sometimes indicated as Blitum capitatum, giving it a common name of strawberry blite. Native to North America and Europe.

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Mon Sep 13, 2010 10:33 pm
 
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When the Leaves Come Falling Down

A nice tune from Van:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OP0uPNfP ... re=related

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OP0uPNfPJJE&feature=related[/youtube]

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Sat Sep 18, 2010 12:13 am
 
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A nice black walnut

ENTS-

Today I was scouting areas to measure after leaf drop, and found this nice single trunk black walnut along the Rocky River near my home----it measured 14' 2'' CBH and 92' in height. I think I will be able to get more height after leaf drop. Other large trees included sycamores, tulips, cottonwoods and ashes; I'll return later this fall to get measurements.
Walnut .jpg Walnut trunk.jpg Walnut crown.jpg

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Sat Sep 18, 2010 5:01 pm
 
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A Northern Ohio (brief) report

ENTS-

Today I visited (or at least tried to visit) Secrest Arboretum in Wooster, Ohio. Secrest is part Ohio State University's OARDC, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Sadly, a tornado a month ago devastated the collections, with some of the plantings a century old. Many of Secrest's collections are, or were unique, in that they were for silvicultural assessment---blocks of tree species planted adjacent to related species for comparison. The tornado really damaged the conifers section. Nearly all of the arboretum was closed and posted "No Trespassing", but I sneaked in to get the photos below.
Secrest sign.jpg Tornado damage Secrest.jpg

Since I couldn't measure at Secrest as I had intended, I went to Sand Run, about 40 minutes away to the NE. I've reported on Sand Run numerous times in the past, and today I was just scouting other areas of the park for measuring possibilities after leaf drop. Here are a couple of finds:

An 89.2' x 7' 1'' Butternut; '.jpg

And a nice Tulip-tree, 143.4' x 14' 10''; '.jpg ' crown.jpg

The Tulip will likely go 150' plus after leaf drop, and I think there might be some Tulips in the park that will go to 165'(162.6" tallest so far)

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Sat Oct 16, 2010 7:27 pm
 
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Johnson Woods, aka Graber Woodlot, Wayne Co., OH

ENTS-

This morning I visited Johnson Woods state nature preserve near Marshallville, Ohio:http://www.dnr.state.oh.us/location/dnap/johnson_woods/tabid/898/Default.aspx

This is a 200 acre old growth preserve with a very mature oak-hickory forest which is gradually transitioning to beech-maple. This woods was once known as the Graber woodlot, and as such was studied and written about by Lucy Braun(there is a discussion of this area in her book "The Deciduous Forests of Eastern North America").

The preserve has very little relief, perhaps a total of 4', and is wet at some times of the year, but there is a slightly elevated boardwalk that allows easy access. The boardwalk snakes through the area of old trees, with many fallen oaks evident, The ODNR website mentions trees 4' to 5' in diameter, but nothing close to the 5' size was visible. The forest consists primarily of white and red oaks, shagbark hickory, beech, white ash, red and sugar maples. Other species present included white elm, pin and swamp white oak. Species not present or at least not obvious were black oak, tulip-tree, walnut, cottonwood, and basswood.

My overall impression was that of a mature forest of limited species composition but with many nice old trees, especially white oaks, but there were no really huge trees present in the areas I saw. The canopy height consistently averaged 105'-110', with a few mature trees breaking above that. Much of the area was not visible from the boardwalk, so there could be trees of larger girth elsewhere in the park, but there were no ravines or coves that would promote really tall tress----I've come to realize here in N Ohio steep dissected topography is needed to to get heights above 130'.

Below are some photos and recorded sizes of a few trees in the preserve. All heights should be considered ''not less than", since the canopy is still pretty full and clean shots were difficult to get.

Northern red oak 114.7' x 11' 4'': '.jpg ' crown.jpg
White oak 115.6' x 11' 10'': '.jpg ' crown.jpg
Shagbark hickory 123.2' x 8' 11'': '.jpg ' crown.jpg
Red maple 116' x 9' 1'': '.jpg ' crown.jpg

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Tue Oct 19, 2010 3:00 pm
 
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Sand Run, again...big Tulips and Red Oak

ENTS-

I've reported regarding this site several times in the past, but I really feel it is a significant location due to the size an quality of the tuliptrees, which approach their northernmost native range in northern Ohio but still achieve heights of 160' and circumferences of 15'. Yesterday I returned to Sand Run with the intention of recording the positions and elevations of tuliptrees which I considered "significant", but there were just too many of them and the terrain was too steep in many areas to approach the trees. The heights should be read as "at least as", since they were taken near the trunk with still considerable foliage canopy cover.I was able to record a few, with sizes and GPS coordinates, and basal elevations plotted on the attached Google Map:
http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?client=firefox-a&hl=en&ie=UTF8&msa=0&msid=114669901641782557636.0004934f2866bb3015e02&ll=41.133892,-81.565583&spn=0.012493,0.027874&z=16

It's interesting to see that heights increase as elevation decreases; a response to growing in ravines. There were many more trees I didn't record, and the ones I did record will likely get taller after leaf drop, since the canopy was still fairly dense. The park is very easy to get to and I encourage ENTS members to visit--it really is an exceptional spot.

Tuliptrees, 153' center, 162' distant center: ' distant center.jpg
Typical view of forest, with a large tulip on the right and a large red oak on the left: Typical view.jpg
Northern red oak, 114.31' x 15' 4'' '.jpg
Tuliptree, 125' x 15' 10'' likely double pith '.jpg ' crown.jpg
The Bob Leverett Tuliptree, 162.6' x 15' '.jpg

The park also has a beech at 132' and a bitternut at 141'.

There are areas of the park I haven't gotten to yet, which might produce even taller/larger trees, especially tulips. I'd welcome any company in exploring the rest of the area.

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Sun Oct 24, 2010 9:14 am
 
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Rocky River Reservation slopes and plateau forest

ENTS-

Yesterday I visited Rocky River Reservation, part of the Cleveland Metroparks and the closest park to my home with extensive woodlands. I've mentioned the area in the past in reference to fall colors and the floodplain forests. On this trip I concentrated on a small area of upland forest on the slopes and top of an elevated plateau adjacent to the river. I wasn't sure what to expect, since it is within a large urban area, and has portions of the woods planted in non-native Scots and red pines. I was pleasantly surprised to find the tallest white oak I've measured----white oaks are very common here in NE Ohio, but they usually take on a picturesque craggy appearance as they mature, with heights of 100' to 110'----this tree was tall and graceful at 128.2', and with a cbh of 12' 1'' it has to be a fairly old tree. Photos of the white oak:
'.jpg ' trunk.jpg ' crown.jpg

Other nice trees included a red oak at 110' x 11' 7'': '.jpg ' crown.jpg

a white ash at 114' x 11' 10'': '.jpg ' crown.jpg

and a tuliptree at 126.4' x 10' 3'' '.jpg ' crown.jpg

Rucker Index: R I Rocky River slopes.JPG

This R I compares to a R I of 120.18' for the floodplain forest within the same park, which had a tulip at 136' as the tallest.

The slope and plateau forest is the first woods I've measured where tuliptree is present but not the tallest species.

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Wed Nov 03, 2010 7:14 pm
 
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Two possible(likely?) state height records today...

ENTS-

Today Randy Brown and I took advantage of a beautiful late fall day and returned to Sand Run, in search of the elusive 165' tuliptree. We didn't find a tulip to break that height(although I think it's still out there), but we did manage to find what is likely the tallest recorded northern red oak in Ohio, at 146' tall and 10' 6'' girth, growing in a small ravine in the company of 140'-150' tulips. ' northern red oak.jpg ' northern red oak crown.jpg
From there we went up the ravine to a large tulip, which at 135' tall 16' 6'' girth, and average branch spread around 85', would be at least a tie for the Ohio's "big tree" of this species. ' tuliptree.jpg
From there we explored a secluded hemlock glen, with a number of trees in the 125' x 8' range. Hemlock glen.jpg
We also remeasured the tallest tulip we found last year, and we were pleased to find it is now 15' in girth and 163.72' tall. This is likely the height record for accurately measured tuliptrees in the state. Another nice find was a shingle oak at 104' tall and 9' 9'' in girth. '.jpg
The current Rucker Index for this site, and the City of Akron, is now 135.91. R I Sand Run-Akron.JPG
Typical topography at site: Typical topography.jpg

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Tue Nov 09, 2010 8:26 pm
 
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Re: Two possible(likely?) state height records today...

ENTS-

I returned to Sand Run today to get a preliminary 20 species Rucker Index---I'm sure this will be modified upwards in the future, but here are the current figures: R I 20.JPG

Also found another nice Tulip in a different area of the park, at 151.8' x 15' 2'', with another large Tulip behind it to the right: ' trunk.jpg ' crown.jpg

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Sat Nov 13, 2010 8:25 pm
 
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Ohio record Tuliptree nominated today

ENTS-

Randy Brown and I have nominated a Tulip at Sand Run which should easily be the state record "Big Tree" for the species. This is the tallest one we've found there(the Bob Leverett Tree), and today I returned to get an average crown spread measurement, which we failed to get previously---the numbers are: 163.72' in height, rounded down to 163'; 176'' in girth(taken at 4.5' from the uphill side as per ODNR's ''Big Tree" guidelines); and 91' average crown spread. These give us a score of 361.75(362)points utilizing the method proscribed by the ODNR and AFA. The current Ohio record Tuliptree is listed on the Ohio Big Trees website at 353 points, so this should be the new record, although it will take until 2012 to show in the register. I think this tree is also the tallest height accurately measured for the species in Ohio, and might even be the tallest accurately measured tree of any species in the state.
Record tuliptree.jpg

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Sat Nov 20, 2010 8:09 pm
 
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Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Ritchie Ledges

ENTS-

Today while driving to Kent State University to pick up my youngest son for winter break I took a short detour to Ritchie Ledges in northern Summit County, Ohio. This is an area I've posted about a couple of times before, mainly in reference to a stand of Carolina hemlock present there along a sandstone cliff. The main purpose of the trip was to record the largest individual of that species for nomination to the state "big tree" database---there currently is no entry for Carolina hemlock, so I'm quite sure this tree(on left) will be the record, at 66' in height and 4' 2'' in girth: Carolina hemlock 66' x 4' top.jpg

I also remeasured a nice tuliptree and cucumber magnolia, which have grown since last measuring in April 2009--the tulip is now 131.2' in height, 11' 5'' girth: Tuliptree 131,2' x 11' 5''.jpg

The magnolia is now 124' in height, 9' 6'' in girth: Cucumber magnolia 124' x 9' 6''.jpg Cucumber magnolia 124' x 9' 6'' crown.jpg

It was a very pleasant morning, with a fresh snowfall and no-one else in the woods. The colors in the sandstone cliffs seem to become more vibrant in winter: Colorful sandstone.jpg Typical scenery.jpg

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Fri Dec 17, 2010 8:16 pm
 
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Re: Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Ritchie Ledges

Turner-

Here is a link from the main ENTS website to an earlier thread regarding the Carolina hemlock population: http://groups.google.com/group/entstrees/browse_thread/thread/c1754c1d0734f0f2?hl=en

And another link to a Picasa album with more photos: http://picasaweb.google.com/srgalehouse/CarolinaHemlocksRitchieLedges?feat=directlink

They are definitely Carolina hemlocks---the Ohio DNR knows of them and feels they were planted during the 1930's as part of a CCC project, and the CCC did develop trails in the area. I just find it highly unlikely a relatively obscure species would have been planted back then, perfectly sited on a western facing sandstone cliff along with associated plants like blueberry, serviceberry and mountain-holly, especially when a large, very native population of Eastern hemlock is contiguous with this stand. There are over 90 individuals of Carolina hemlock, ranging from 60'+ to saplings and seedlings---certainly not an even aged stand as would be expected if planted in the 1930's. I also question if the largest individuals could achieve their size in 80 years time--they grow more slowly than Eastern hemlock. At the very least this is a reproducing, native appearing population that might end up as the "last stand" as the adelgid progresses north and west

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Fri Dec 17, 2010 10:20 pm
 
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