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North Chagrin Reservation: Cumulative Forest Data

Height Index

153.5' Tuliptree
139.5' Northern red oak
139.3' White ash
136.0' Eastern hemlock
133.0' Bitternut hickory
128.6' Slippery elm
127.7' American beech
127.7' Sugar maple
127.5' Blackgum
125.7' American elm
125.7' Eastern cottonwood
123.3' Black cherry
123.2' Black walnut
122.7' Sassafras
120.7' White oak
120.3' Red maple
119.0' Pignut hickory
118.8' Eastern white pine
118.5' Cucumber-Tree
118.5' American sycamore
112.5' American basswood
110.5' Shagbark hickory
107.8' Black ash
103.8' Mockernut hickory
087.4' Yellow birch

RHI05: 140.26'
RHI10: 133.85'
RHI20: 127.46'
Girth Index

18' 03" Red oak
14' 08" American chestnut * stump circumference @ highest point (2.5')
13' 09" Tuliptree
13' 06" White oak
13' 01" American beech
12' 07" Sugar maple
11' 07" Red Maple
11' 06" Blackgum
10' 08" Cucumber-Tree
10' 08" White ash
10' 06" Eastern cottonwood
10' 04" Eastern hemlock
10' 01" Black cherry
08' 10" American basswood
08' 08" Eastern white pine
08' 08" American elm
08' 05" Black ash
08' 04" Sassafras
08' 04" Black walnut
08' 02" Butternut
08' 01" Slippery elm
08' 01" Shagbark hickory
07' 05" American sycamore
06' 10" Mockernut hickory
06' 07" Pignut hickory
05' 05" Yellow birch
02' 01" Northern fox grape *Vine
RGI05: 14.65000'
RGI10: 13.02500'
RGI20: 11.02917'
Blue denotes a single specimen for height and girth

Conical Volume

<1100ft³ <900ft³ <700ft³ <500ft³ <300ft³

1.) Northern red oak
1113 ft³ 18' 03" by 126.0'
1064 ft³ 18' 02" by 121.5'
1021 ft³ 17' 08" by 123.3'
953 ft³ 17' 05" by 118.5'
706 ft³ 15' 01" by 117.0'
583 ft³ 14' 02" by 109.5'
506 ft³ 13' 00" by 112.9'
485 ft³ 14' 09" by 084.0'
421 ft³ 10' 08" by 139.5'
2.) Tuliptree
689 ft³ 13' 09" by 137.4'
676 ft³ 13' 08" by 136.5'
571 ft³ 11' 11" by 151.6'
520 ft³ 11' 11" by 138.0'
495 ft³ 12' 02" by 126.0'
465 ft³ 12' 02" by 118.5'
454 ft³ 11' 06" by 129.4'
449 ft³ 10' 06" by 153.5'
446 ft³ 11' 10" by 120.0'
409 ft³ 11' 00" by 127.5'
311 ft³ 10' 03" by 111.5'
3.) American beech
541 ft³ 13' 01" by 119.2'
528 ft³ 12' 09" by 122.5'
416 ft³ 11' 07" by 117.0'
379 ft³ 10' 11" by 120.0'
377 ft³ 11' 02" by 114.1'
345 ft³ 10' 06" by 118.0'
4.) White oak
533 ft³ 13' 06" by 110.2'
473 ft³ 12' 02" by 120.5'
370 ft³ 10' 09" by 120.7'
5.) Sugar maple
496 ft³ 12' 07" by 118.1'
362 ft³ 11' 02" by 109.5'
6.)Blackgum
389 ft³ 11' 06" by 111.0'
344 ft³ 10' 01" by 127.5'
344 ft³ 10' 07" by 115.7'
7.) Eastern cottonwood
368 ft³ 10' 06" by 125.7'
8.) White ash
358 ft³ 10' 08" by 118.5'
339 ft³ 09' 07" by 139.3'
9.) Red maple
357 ft³ 11' 07" by 100.2'
10.) Black cherry
333 ft³ 10' 01" by 123.3'
11.) Cucumber-Tree
324 ft³ 10' 08" by 107.5'
12.) Eastern hemlock
317 ft³ 10' 04" by 111.8'



Additional Information

North Chagrin History.rtf
Chagrin composite map.jpg
1943219.pdf
Chagrin Birds Eye Map2.jpg
V095N4_281.pdf

Damage and ongoing problems within the forest:
*Chestnut blight - chestnut, once a dominate in the parks mixed forest - is now locally extinct in this forest
*Dutch elm disease - prevents the parks elm from establishing large numbers, and mature sizes
*Emerald ash borer - northern half of the forest is currently decimated from EAB
*Invasive earthworms - duff layer damage
*Overpopulation of white-tail deer - diversity and density of undergrowth suffering - Undoubtedly due to predatory extinctions via ecological isolation
*Invasive plant species - The park has planted many decorative non-native species in the fields, now establishing themselves in the forest. Birds and deer have further spread non-native species
*Extinction and extirpation of forest wildlife - Especially large mammals, but also birds, amphibians, and reptiles
*Drainage problems - mainly this is due to poor trail design
*Lack of formal protection - Invasive species will not be intervened by the Cleveland Metroparks

Problems present in the local area, but unconfirmed in the park:
*Beech bark disease

Definite, or potential problems in the near future:
*Hemlock woolly adelgid



Re-establishment of wildlife diversity in the forest
Black bear - Extirpated since the 1830's, recently seen in Ohio, at least one survives almost exclusively within North Chagrin Reservation
American beaver - Extirpated since the 1830's, beaver recently re-established their presence in the floodplains below the forest
Eastern coyotes - Perhaps non-native. Today's population originated from the west and had been spotted in the area since the late 1970's. A pack of three coyotes with pups holds territory to the north, and two coyotes with pups is established to the south. Alpha pairs with three or four subordinate adults are not uncommon in the local area.
White-tail deer - Another animal extinct since the 1830's, sightings occurred in the late 1930's. Though, the historic population was never this high. Until the unlikely return of large predators the parks deer are annually culled, but it was once, and is now again a part of the ecosystem

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZRayUjTYQs4

*This post will be continuously updated with information. Please inform me of any errors on State Champion trees. I based the initial data on the BTD
http://rev215.treesdb.org/Browse/Sites/601/Details
Big Trees Database

Updated 9/10/2011
by dantheman9758
Sat Aug 13, 2011 5:50 pm
 
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Re: North Chagrin Reservation: Cumulative Forest Data

ENTS,

I just wanted to chime in with an update:

I now have all the tools I necessary to obtain ENTS accurate field measurements! I'm practicing the laser/clinometer/sine method, and I'm in the process of collecting all of the important GPS points for leaf-drop before I forget where everything is. I don't have time to organize all of the new data I've collected but here is some highlights from today:

*Chestnut stumps: 14' 8" and an 11' 8" @ 2.5' (where they were cut). That makes Chestnut the second "largest" species from the original forest. And they were numerous, the stumps are everywhere. Damn. I would have loved some real measurements.

*There are no less than 5 Blackgum over 3' diameter, and 100' tall.

*The trail-side Red Oak still comes in at 18' 3" but the very similar looking interior big Red Oak is now accurately measured to 18' 2". So there's two 18'ers!

*There is now a Hemlock that I measured to 136', that lidar indicated was 136.38'. I also found another spectacular Blackgum that I measured to 127.5' x 10' 1" that Lidar indicated was closer to 123', I will keep my eye on this tree after leaf-drop.


I don't have all good news though, the CMP research application is daunting to say the least. I've put a good 6 hours into it on my downtime at work and I feel that I'm making little progress. Here's what their process entails:

http://www.clemetparks.com/Naturalresources/documents/Proposal%20requirements.pdf

http://www.clemetparks.com/Naturalresources/researchpermit.asp

In the simplest terms all I would like to do is "legally" be allowed to collect the data so that I can plug it into the ENTS database and it looks like I've got to jump through hoops to make that happen. They'll be looking for either an interim or final report. I don't know if I'm interpreting their requirements correctly but if they expect full blown research than I honestly don't feel that I'm qualified to put together any sort of "analysis" of this data. All I desire to do is collect the data, and the most I can do is:


*Map the extended boundaries of old-growth within the park. (with the help of gps, google earth, lidar etc)

*Measure/Map superlative specimens within the park. (height/dbh/cs and perhaps age via coring)

That permit application is making a mountain out of a mole mound... I can post what I had started this coming Tuesday when I return to the office. Any suggestions or tips that could help move this along faster would be much appreciated!

Dan
by dantheman9758
Sun Sep 04, 2011 10:03 pm
 
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