Search found 151 matches

Return

Howland's Island

Dear Ents,

This past summer I made several tree-measuring trips to Howland’s Island, part of the extensive Montezuma NWF in Central NY’s Cayuga and Wayne counties. The Island is separated from the mainland by the Seneca River/Erie Canal and consists of about 3,000 acres of marsh, ponds, meadows, farmland, and rolling hills, or drumlins. Although the management of the NWF and the Island is heavily geared toward the maintenance of local and migratory bird habitat, the Island itself is as biologically diverse an area as can be found in central NY. Little old growth has survived, and likely no contiguous patches, but the Island is dotted with a variety of both large and old trees. The NYS DEC has a good description of the Island on its website: http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/68699.html .

The low-lying swamp areas of the Island are populated mainly by silver maple, ashes, eastern cottonwood, and swamp white oak. The well-drained flat areas and hillsides consist of a healthy mix of northern hardwoods, such as sugar maple, American sycamore, bitternut and shagbark hickory, tulip tree, black locust, black cherry, and various oaks. Conifers are noticeably absent from the landscape, save the planted Norway spruces and northern white cedars, a lone red pine, and a sparse scattering of eastern white pine. The hilltops harbor a lot of northern red oaks and hickories.

The tree heights on Howland’s Island are not exceptional, because of the latitude, forest age, and climate, but I still came up with an R10 of 111.8' and an R20 of 103.4'. So far, I have measured 15 species over 100’, and with more effort, can probably eventually bump that up to 20. Most of the tall trees are located on hillsides, made up of young, even-aged hardwoods. The attractiveness of the Island to me is more in the number of large-girthed trees and the diversity of species for the area.

The girth 10 index is 12.2’ and the 20 index is 9.6’. The main culprits here are the cottonwoods, sycamores, and northern red oaks, all of which grow very well on the Island.

As far as variety is concerned, Howland’s Island is certainly no southern Appalachian community, but so far I’ve identified about 40 species of measurable trees, with more likely to come. Some uncommon species for the area found on the Island include sassafras, black gum, and chinkapin oak. I have also found small American chestnut sprouts across the road from the Island’s access road, but on private land.

Here are some of the highlights of my measuring adventures, organized courtesy of the Galehouses:

http://alpha.treesdb.org/Browse/Sites/793/Details .

HGT GRTH

ABASWOOD1 92.8’ 11.2’
ABASWOOD2 100.6’
ABEECH1 82’ 9.3’
ABEECH2 90.8’
AMELM1 105’
AMELM2 86.5’ 6.5’
AMSYCMR1 117’ 12’
BGUM1 72’ 7.2’
BGUM2 8’
BITNTHICK1 114’ 10.5’ *TRUNK DIVIDES JUST ABOVE BREAST HEIGHT*
BITNTHICK2 113’
BLCKCHRY1 113.8’
BLCKCHRY2 111’ 8.4’
BLCKLOCST1 118.7’ 5.3’
BLCKWILW1 68.8’
BLCKWNT1 102.5' 7’
BUROAK1 83.5’ 5.8’
BTASPEN1 78’ 5.9’
BUTRNUT1 84’ 5’
BUTRNUT2 60’ 8.4’
CHACKBRY1 84’
CHNKPNOAK1 2.4’
CHSTNTOAK1 69.6’ 7.6’
ESTCOTWD1 111.2’ 14.5’
ESTCOTWD2 106.1' 15.7’
ESTWHTPN1 107’
NROAK1 93.4’ 19.9’
NROAK2 13.8’
NROAK3 11.8’
NROAK4 111’
NWCEDAR1 39.7’ 2.4’
QUASPEN1 74.5’
RDMAPL1 95’
RDPIN1 59.3’ 6’
SASFRAS1 81’ 4.4’
SHGHICK1 102’
SILMAPL1 103.9’ 8.7’
SILMAPL2 96.4’ 10.5’
SUGMAPL1 104.7’
SUGMAPL2 109’ 5.7’
SUGMAPL3 76’ 11.8’
SWMPWOAK1 78.7’ 12.1’
WHTASH1 109’
WHTOAK1 83.5’ 9.9’
YPOPLR1 107.5’ 6.5’

**Whole height numbers represent a straight-up from the ground laser shot plus 2 yards for my height, and are necessarily less accurate than heights obtained using the sine-sine method resulting in heights rounded to the nearest tenth decimal place. Heights determined using a Nikon Prostaff 440 laser rangefinder, Suunto clinometer, and Texas Instruments scientific calculator in conjunction with the NTS sine-sine method. Circumferences determined using a Spencer logging tape wrap at 4.5'.**

The ages of the trees on the island are all over the map, but most of the forest is fairly young (70-80 years or less). The white pines and Norway spruces were likely planted during the 1930s as part of the CCC's work, and many of the trees likely sprouted after that period. The island has a long history of human use, and for a long time I assumed it contained no old growth at all, but the size of the two black gums has put some doubt of that in my mind. These trees have very deep-ridged bark on one side and smoother bark on the other, and appear at first glance to be ordinary cottonwoods. Boy, was I excited when I spotted tons of the small blue fruit on the ground! I have not yet explored the whole island, so there may be more such finds hiding themselves.

The gem of the island, and my favorite tree, is a northern red oak, 93.4’ in height with a girth of 19’-10”. This boy is a monster.

DSC00263.JPG

I hope to bag some more measurements ASAP, but the Island is a popular hunting destination during the fall and winter, so the next trip may have to wait a few months.

Elijah
by ElijahW
Fri Dec 02, 2011 2:25 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Bear Creek Trail, Gannett Poplar and a nice hemlock!

Eli,

Nice job! Very impressive trees. With regard to the hemlock, I'll take honesty over embarrassment anytime (just look up my short report on Donner Summit - 0/2 on species ID). Plus, if you're not honest about something and somebody takes a closer look (at your numbers or whatever) then you'll rightly be both embarrassed and dishonest. And this would generally looked upon as a negative in a person. I enjoy your reports, even if you have a weird name (most of my relatives call me Eli). Keep up the good work.

Elijah
by ElijahW
Thu Jan 19, 2012 1:48 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: THE HUNT FOR HYPERION

JRS,

I saw that movie a couple of years ago. Not bad. I remember it taking several weeks to become available through Netflix, but it was worth the wait. I also have several old logging and forest service videos on DVD that I take out from time to time, just to get an idea of what forests and trees looked like in the early- to mid-20th century.

Elijah
by ElijahW
Mon Feb 27, 2012 12:01 am
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Frazer Forest, Atlanta, GA

Eli,

I live about 3 hours west of Cobleskill, so I can't give you any specific locales to check out. But I have traversed I-88 several times and can give a general description of the land. You'll see lots of hemlocks, though much smaller in stature than maybe you're used to in the South, but they're also healthy. White pines are also very common, as are sugar and silver maple, northern red oak, birches, and shagbark hickory, depending of course on elevation, soil, and other factors. Depending on the amount of spare time you have, I would encourage you to make the trek up the road to the southern Adirondacks, if you haven't before (or even if you have). Bob Leverett is constantly reporting on the 'Daks, and for good reason. I love it up there, as well as across the pond in Vermont. Oh, yeah, another interesting thing about the Albany area is the pitch pines. They grow associated with oaks mainly (white, black, and northern red) and remind me of parts of Long Island and New Jersey, minus the holly (I don't think holly is present there anyway).

I hope that little bit helps, and I'm sorry I can't give you much in the way of details. I guess you'll have to explore for yourself, unless Bob, Jess Riddle, or someone else has more to say. Happy hunting!

Elijah
by ElijahW
Sun Mar 11, 2012 3:02 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Tsuga canadensis Soundscapes in Litchfield, CT

Michael,

Thank you for sharing these recordings. I just listened to "Tsuga canadensis" and "Quercus velutina & Picea abies" indoors on a laptop without headphones, and they brought me right into the woods. The sound is very soothing, and I look forward to listening to them again through my studio headphones and surround sound at home. Great work.

Elijah
by ElijahW
Fri Mar 16, 2012 7:12 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Moravia, NY, Cottonwood

NTS,

This trip report will be fairly brief, owing to the fact that it features only one measured tree. But it's a pretty big tree, so I figured that I should give it its shot at the spotlight. The tree is a locally famous (at least among tree people) eastern cottonwood, or populus deltoides in the village of Moravia, NY, which is located at the south end of Owasco Lake, one of the smaller Finger Lakes. Some ents may have heard of this tree or seen it in person, or even written about it (my apologies if that's the case). I visited the tree a couple of years ago after reading an archived local newspaper article making reference to it on the internet (I wasn't able to locate the article again for this report), but I made no measurements at the time. The poplar was touted as Cayuga County's largest tree, and I now would probably agree, both in terms of girth and total volume.

This past week, I had some time off from work and an itch to measure, so I figured I'd mosey on down and finally do the work and crunch the numbers and see if I really did have a noteworthy tree on my hands. In addition, Bob Leverett's recent report on the northern NY/Champlain Valley cottonwoods made me curious as to where this tree stood in comparison. The short answer: very favorably. Here are the stats: height: 107.8'; cbh: 29.0'; average crown spread: 100.7'. Like most area cottonwoods, this tree has lost many large limbs during its lifetime, as you may be able to see in the pictures below. Unlike most area cottonwoods, this tree has one solid trunk and its fallen limbs were located high in the canopy, so the crown spread has significant room for improvement. Here's the fat lady in all her glory:

008.JPG

009.JPG

010.JPG

Maybe it's not the most beautiful or tallest tree around, but it's the biggest tree I've measured, and I figured I'd give her props. Here's a link to more stats, courtesy of the Galehouse trees database: http://alpha.treesdb.org/Browse/Sites/1095/Details

Elijah
by ElijahW
Sat Mar 03, 2012 12:25 am
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Multitrunk vs Single Trunk Trees

Y'all,

moravia01.JPG

Will Blozan wrote: WoW! Nice tree! Thanks for posting. It does look like a double to me, though.

Bart Bouricious wrote: Your right, it could be, but when you magnify it as much as possible it seems ambiguous. Maybe when and if Elija goes back to get a size comparison picture he can check to see if the separation line really does seem to run all the way down and get some images of that. I wonder is someone knows how common it is for cottonwoods to fuse trunks in such a way that you cant tell. I am spending too much time on this bulletin board, but its raining on the slush here now.

Turner Sharp wrote: Bart: Along the Ohio river it is not unusual to see fused mutlistem cottonwoods. I am currently in Arizona and in the past couple of days I observed a couple of hundred Fremont Cottonwoods along water courses. I would estimate 15-25 percent were fused multistems. Will have some decent Arizona tree numbers and trip reports to post have when I get back. i agree with Will B. it looks like a possible fused double.

Regarding the fused trunk hypothesis, I hadn't even considered it until now. As Bart inferred, if the tree is a double, it really isn't noticeable in the overall form. My argument for the single-tree theory: 1) The main trunk, up to the first big split (~20-30' up), is fairly symmetrical all the way around from ground level (no bulbous protrusions or deep hollows); 2) Double trees (especially in this area) tend to split apart before reaching this size, I'm guessing from a combination of freeze-thaw cycles and heavy snow and wind, but that's just an uneducated guess; and 3) The tree presents itself, from almost every angle, as one individual, not two or more individuals combined. Part of the problem here is that I only took photos from one direction, so I'm not giving an overall representation of the tree. I respect every opinion expressed on this forum, especially those lots of experience with this kind of thing, and if I'm proven wrong, that's ok with me. You fellows have good eyes, and I certainly see the quality of your reasoning.

If anybody is in the area, I would encourage you to visit the cottonwood and take pictures, for sure. Just watch out for vehicles coming down the hill and around the bend while you're there.

Elijah
by ElijahW
Sun Mar 04, 2012 3:55 am
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Three favorite tree Question.

Bountry,

Good question. I remember the topic being discussed before, but it never gets old. My list:

1. Quercus rubra ; it's the most common oak native to my area, has large leaves, and I think the bark looks cool.
2. Pseudotsuga menziesii ; one of the most versatile trees - fast-growing, capable of extreme dimensions, excellent for lumber, good looking.
3. Larix laricina ; tough choice, but how can you argue with a cone-bearing deciduous tree with common names like hackmatack and tamarack?

Elijah
by ElijahW
Wed Apr 11, 2012 9:58 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Least favorite trees

Steve,

"One of the best landscape improvement treatments for Silver maple one can utilize includes a chainsaw!"

I love it! The strange thing about silver maple, blue spruce, and a few other commonly planted species is that I really enjoy seeing them in their native habitat. Some trees just don't belong in certain places, kind of like a fat lady in a swimsuit contest or boxed wine in a fine restaurant or an AMC Gremlin...anywhere in public view.
amcgremlin.jpg

Elijah
by ElijahW
Sat Apr 14, 2012 10:33 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: The Interrupted Forest (Maine)

Jenny,

I'm ordering a copy of Mr. Rolde's book right now. I love this kind of stuff. My family has a long history in New England (albeit mostly the southern part), and the history of the area is close to home for me. Thanks for sharing.

Elijah
by ElijahW
Fri May 18, 2012 8:54 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Washington Grove City Park, NY

Ents,

On Monday, May 21, I met up with Larry Champoux at Washington Grove, and he gave me the nickle tour (I forgot to pay). Many tree heights were roughly measured, a real, live, Canadian was encountered on the trail, and a generally good time was had by all. It's been mentioned before, but I'll say it again: the black oaks here are unique, because of both their great size and assumed age, and ought to be recognized and treasured as such for the rest of their natural lives. Here's a copy of the email Larry sent me after our visit. Larry combined Tom Howard's comments and measurements and added my height measurements at the bottom for each tree.
WashingtonGroveVisit1.docx
A few comments about the height measurements:
First, the height of the first black oak measured, near the main entrance "111-120 ft." is probably a comment I made to Larry. I need to apologize for this, as I don't have my own notes to give a more accurate measurement.
Second, and along the same lines, most of the measurements were straight-up laser shots into the canopy, and should be interpreted as "not less than." The reason for my use of this method was due to the thickness of the canopy and the most impressive trees growing close together and the middle of the grove. This is why I intend to return in the fall or spring after leaf-drop to get some higher numbers.
Third, the tallest tree measured Monday was a tulip tree. Using the sine method, as the tree was fairly open-grown, I came up with a height of 126.6'. On the way back to my car, I also got a height of 105' for a butternut (another straight-up shot).

To sum everything up, here are my maximum height estimations for each of the major species found in Washington Grove (fairly close to Tom's, except for sassafras).
Black oak: 120-125'
White oak: 120-125'
Northern red oak: 115-120'
Tulip tree: 126-130'
Butternut: 110-115'
Sassafras: 100-105'
Black cherry: none measured, but likely 110-115'
Sugar maple: none measured, but likely 115-120'
Rucker height index: likely between 115 and 120' due to the limited number of canopy-height species.

Looking over the report and the numbers, I'm both a little disappointed that I don't have more accurate height numbers (like in the decimal places), but also encouraged by the roughing-out that was done. We now have a starting point for both heights and girths at Washington Grove, and the numbers can only be further refined. Hopefully in the near future, we can add to the data set ages and volume and crown-spread measurements. I'd also like to get some more pictures of the monster oaks. I have a few hiding somewhere on my hard drive, but maybe Tom, Adam, or Larry has better, more recent ones to share (hint, hint).

Elijah
by ElijahW
Sat May 26, 2012 10:15 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Quercus virginiana & Sabal palmetto

Michael,

Excellent, especially the ending. You're the man.

Elijah
by ElijahW
Mon Jun 11, 2012 9:06 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Benefits of exercising in the woods

Ents,

I thought this article would be of interest to those ents who enjoy walks (or jogs, runs, or hikes) in the woods. I figure pretty close to one hundred percent of us fit in this category. The basic gist of the story is confirming the significant mental health advantages of exercise outdoors, especially around trees and in the woods, when compared to exercise performed indoors, or in "non-natural" environments. I strongly agree with the author's conclusion and can testify firsthand to the benefits of exercising in "natural" environments. Here's the link: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/9344129/Jogging-in-forest-twice-as-good-as-trip-to-gym-for-mental-health.html

Enjoy.

Elijah
by ElijahW
Wed Jun 20, 2012 10:45 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Inexpensive quality digital cameras

Ents,

Just a quick update on the Sony Cybershot HX9V I ended up buying. I like it and would recommend it to anyone. I haven't gone crazy with the settings yet, but I also haven't managed to screw up royally with anything. The stills are excellent, and the video is much better than expected. The audio is very good, even without an external mic. What else can I say about it? I'm very happy with the purchase.

Elijah
by ElijahW
Tue Jul 24, 2012 9:43 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Once again, LARGE SIZE doesn't equal OLD AGE

Rand wrote:Crimeny... I guess that begs the question of how big they can get in another 100 years.


Using the equally horrible method of extrapolation, the tree would have been about 40' around, and a hair under 250' tall.

Elijah
by ElijahW
Tue Aug 14, 2012 9:32 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Washington Grove City Park, NY

NTS,

I made a clandestine visit to the Washington Grove Friday, November 23, to measure a few more trees and to re-measure some from my previous outing with Larry Champoux. I apologize for not giving a heads-up to Larry and Tom Howard, and, for that matter, any ents who may have wanted to join me, but this was an unplanned visit. Please, ents, if and when you are in the Rochester area, take some time and walk through this forest. It is a special place, and you will not only see some of the largest oaks and northern hardwoods in this part of the country, but probably some of the oldest, as well. Balding bark and windswept, gnarled crowns abound.

Anyway, here are the numbers I came up with, using my Nikon Prostaff 440, Suunto clinometer, scientific calculator, and metal tape. Sorry, no pictures – I had my camera with me but forgot to use it – oops!

Common Name Height Girth

Scots pine 66.0’ 3’10”
Hophornbeam 56.7’ 3’3”
Sassafras 99.9’ 4’11”
Sassafras 101.9’ 4’10”
Sassafras 104.7’ 5’
Butternut 110.1’ 5’10”
Tuliptree 121.0’
Tuliptree 125.5’ (126’ in earlier visit) 8’7”
Northern Red Oak 110.2’ 8’3”
Northern Red Oak 120.8’ 10’3”
Black Oak 114.6’
White Oak 115.5’ 6’11”
White Oak 120.2’ 7’5”
Sugar Maple 112.1’ 7’4”
Black Cherry 120.3’ 6’4”
Exotic cherry 109.7’ 5’2”

Rucker 10 Height Index: 110.4’
Rucker 5Height Index: 120.2’
Rucker 10 Girth Index: 6.3’

The tallest tree measured was a tuliptree, and I do not think it is likely to be topped. All three species of oaks appear to be older, but also seem max out around 120’. I am guessing that the wind and winter weather are the main reasons for this. Though the tallest black oak I measured came in at 114.6’, I expect at least one will top 120’. The tallest trees seem to be grouped either near the Nunda Blvd. entrance or in the vicinity of the outer trail near the tennis court, which is not far from the entrance.

Elijah
by ElijahW
Sat Nov 24, 2012 8:33 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Urban/Suburban Tree Density Reveals Inequality

Jenny,

This is an interesting observation. From what I've seen, I would agree with the basic premise. I think a direct relationship commonly exists between the affluence of a neighborhood and the average crown size, girth, and age per tree. In other words, the better the neighborhood, the bigger the average tree. The exception may be trailer parks. I've seen some well-forested ones (at least on the outside borders). Why do you think this tree/money relationship exists? I have a few ideas, but doubt it has much to do with the cost of planting trees; this can be done very inexpensively (or for just the cost of one's own labor, if the needed time and patience is there, and a seed source is nearby). For example, I've planted about 70 or 80 trees within the last five years, and the total out of pocket cost (seedlings, mulch, hand-tools) was probably less than $200. Any thoughts?

As a Yankees fan, I'll begrudgingly give props to Santana and the Mets. The three of four people who actually admit to rooting for the Mets have had to wait a long time for a no-hitter. They should savor this moment for as long as they wish.

Elijah
by ElijahW
Sat Jun 02, 2012 1:12 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Old Black Gum? (NY)

I've attached a few pictures of the two largest black gum ( nyssa sylvatica ) I've been able to find on Howland's Island, up here in NY. The taller of the two is 72', and the fatter is 96" around at breast height. I've probably mentioned them in the past, but finally got out today and paid them a visit. I'd like to know what y'all think would be a possible age range, given the pictures and the following site description: The two trees are part of a group of 5-10 mature black gums growing in close proximity, along with many saplings and seedlings of the same species; the terrain is basically elevated swamp that floods regularly, but not necessarily every year; associated species are swamp-loving northern hardwoods (mostly beech, ashes, elms, and soft maple); the black gums disappear as the ground gets both drier and wetter. My guess is that the trees may be very old, just based on the bark characteristics and gnarly growth form, but this is only a guess. Here are the pics:

009.JPG
007.JPG
010.JPG
006.JPG
008.JPG
005.JPG
003.JPG
002.JPG

Also, the surrounding upland, well-drained northern hardwood forest has been logged (probably several times), but this particular swamp does not appear to have been disturbed, at least to the same degree. Thank you for your consideration.

Elijah
by ElijahW
Mon Apr 08, 2013 4:52 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Oak ID

Matt,

From the leaves and acorn, it's a pretty clearly northern red oak, or quercus rubra . The blocky bark resembles chestnut oak, though northern reds can sometimes have deep furrows, especially on poor sites, at least from my experience. I've never seen bark with blocks that pronounced on a northern red oak before, but, assuming the photos are all from the same tree, that would be my ID. It's definitely not black oak, though I suppose the two could hybridize. Cool tree from a cool place.

Elijah
by ElijahW
Fri Jul 12, 2013 6:36 am
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Tree Maximums - Genus of the Week: Crataegus (Hawthorn)

Ed,

I've seen these photos before, but, WOW! The first hawthorn is especially incredible. The hawthorns I normally come across are rarely more than large bushes, size-wise. They're probably a different variety than yours, but, still, Way to Go!

Elijah
by ElijahW
Sat Sep 21, 2013 4:11 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Old Growth report, Bear Swamp East explored w/pictures

John,

Thanks from me, as well. Swamps can be scary places for some people and intriguing places for others, like me. Some of the most amazing trees in the East call swamps their home: the baldcypress, tupelo, sycamore, various oaks, and soft maples. I really enjoyed your description of the place and the photos. Keep up the good work.

Elijah
by ElijahW
Sat Sep 28, 2013 3:41 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Vine identification

Will,

Man, you're quick. Virginia creeper it is, then. That's a piece of cake to ID with leaves, but I was lost without them. I didn't shoot this particular vine with the laser, but the tree is about 100' tall, so it has sic "creeped" at least 80' so far. Thanks for your help, and for the spot on picture.

Elijah
by ElijahW
Sat Nov 02, 2013 8:33 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Cohuttas - A few photos and a few trees (GA)

Matt,

Those are some great photos; I especially like the one of Grassy Mountain. If you remove the green tint, the waves of earth resemble a scene from Nevada. As far as being asked to leave by the ranger, that sucks. I'm not sure how I would have reacted, but I sure would have been perturbed. I may have asked what the penalty would be for not leaving, and then asked how a government, when "shut down" would be able to enforce such a penalty. These frustrations and others pertaining to government I'll keep to myself, however. Thanks for sharing. You're doing great work, and I enjoy reading the "Tree of the Week" posts, though I don't know that I've commented on any of them. Thanks again.

Elijah
by ElijahW
Sun Nov 17, 2013 12:14 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Howland's Island

Jess, NTS,

I just entered Jess's measurements into the trees database http://treesdb.azurewebsites.net/Browse/Sites/9850/Details. I hope everyone's doing well and staying warm.

Elijah
by ElijahW
Sun Dec 08, 2013 7:39 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Tree Maximums - Genus of the Week: Juglans (Walnut)

Matt, NTS,

At Larry Champoux's invitation, I visited Washington Grove City Park in Rochester, NY, last year. Returning on 11/23/2012, I measured several tall butternuts, the tallest of which I've listed below. I do believe taller butternuts can be found in the Park, but I haven't been back to measure since.

Species (Scientific): Juglans cinerea
Species (Common): Butternut
Form (Forest, Open, or Intermediate): Forest
Height (ft): 110.1'
CBH (ft): 5'10"
Maximum Spread (ft): N/A
Average Spread (ft): N/A
Volume (ft3): N/A
Site Name: Washington Grove City Park
Subsite Name: N/A
Country: U.S.
State or Province: NY
Property Owner: Public (City of Rochester, I believe)
Date of Measurement: 11/23/2012
Measurer(s): Elijah Whitcomb
Method of Height Measurement: Sine, rangefinder/clinometer
Tree Name: None
Habitat: City park, among mix of old-growth oaks and maples; other northern hardwoods and common invasives (Norway maple, sweet cherry) also present.
Notes: Possibly tallest butternut in NY State. Fine example of a healthy, forest-grown butternut.

Elijah
by ElijahW
Sun Dec 22, 2013 12:32 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic
cron