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Re: Marsh Billings Estate

it was measured in 2003 46 inches in diameter, 120 feet tall
by adam.rosen
Fri Jun 24, 2011 8:20 pm
 
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Bartholmew's cobble

I know that there have been some nice posts about the huge cottowood and it's smaller bretheren at Bartholomew's Cobble. Well, for the trouble of two tick bites, I have some photos of that tree, as well as nice tulip tree that has been marked at the Cobble. Bartholmew's Cobble is a very nice place to visit on the Northern Mass and Connecticut border, and I think the whole Route 7 corridor, from Connecticut to Pittsfield, is prime tree viewing territory.]adam next to cotton wood.jpg[/attachment]jpg[/attachment] adam next to tulip tree.jpg
by adam.rosen
Sat Jun 25, 2011 1:27 pm
 
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elephant tree/native trail marker tree

Here is the famed Putney Mountain "Elephant Tree" a huge Ash tree, circa 2002, with my kids and I much younger than we are now. Of course, no measurements from me, just the experience of the tree. It is supposed to be a Native American Trail Marker from the 1700's. Probably is too.
by adam.rosen
Wed Aug 24, 2011 5:13 pm
 
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Fall Hike, 2011

I'm in the business of creating little ENTS, (not the reproduction end, the education end). Today we took 130 potential ENTS up Elmore Mountain in Northern Vermont. We enjoyed the company, the good weather and colorful leaves. I took some pictures of a few impressive/older yellow birches, that seemed to have been spared the loggers axe for the last few hundred years. Hope you enjoy them.

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by adam.rosen
Mon Oct 03, 2011 5:13 pm
 
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Re: Three favorite tree Question.

Yellow Birch
Sugar Maple
Great big red oaks
by adam.rosen
Wed Apr 11, 2012 9:56 pm
 
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Elder's Grove, in Paul Smith's NY

twisted crack.jpg tree goddess.jpg looking up.jpg results of microburst, 7-22-12.jpg I went to the 1675 Grove, or the Elder's Grove, in Paul Smith's NY on July 28, 2012. We lost one of the big ones during last week's microburst. The rest of the trees are standing tall and looking very impressive. I love how the canopy in that grove has two levels- normal second growth level and then the OMG level. I have pictures of some of the tall trees in the grove, a picture of myself with the enormous snag, only a few days old, and a photo of some sort of tree nymph who I ran into on the way.
The directions to the grove can be accessed with a google search for elders grove, and an article from Adirondack Life comes up.

I know that there are trees in the MTSF that are taller, and the tall ones are more numerous, but the 1675 grove has a gnarly factor that is hard to match. Some well weathered yellow birches are a bonus, not big, but obviously old and really cool. There is also at least one old growth maple that's right up there with some of the other old growth maples I've seen-Gifford Woods or the Syracuse witness tree.
by adam.rosen
Sun Jul 29, 2012 9:15 pm
 
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Re: Gifford Woods State Park Aug. 22, 2012

That trail is great, isn't it? It must have been a fun project for some tree lover. I've been driving that stretch of road since 1986. I've walked it, ran it, cycled it and never saw the big grove until I went into the underbrush. You can't see it from the road. Now I've got to go back with a tape measure and get some data and photographs to match my words. Worse things could happen.

Here is the description of the grove you missed, the one across the road, from the Vermont Natural Areas sections of the Vermont State Parks website.

"11. Gifford Woods Natural Area. 7 acres, Gifford Woods State Park, Town of Sherburne. This is perhaps Vermont's best known old-growth northern hardwood stand, with many grand-sized individual trees of sugar maple, beech, yellow birch, basswood, white ash, and hemlock. The understory is rich with native wildflowers. Though small, it has been much visited and researched. It was designated a National Natural Landmark in 1980."
by adam.rosen
Mon Sep 03, 2012 4:07 pm
 
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Re: Richmond: Hollywood Cemetery

Here are some photos, of the southern pine species that I can't identify, tulip poplar, sycamore, and bald cypress. Nothing spectacular, just nice trees in a beautiful spot, about 150 years old. Really, an amazing scenic spot, overlooking the James River. A must see for Ents visiting Richmond VA.
by adam.rosen
Sun Jan 06, 2013 9:53 am
 
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Tabletop Moutain

adam with buttressed root white birch.jpg 29. Tabletop Mountain Natural Area. 129 acres, Groton State Forest, Town of Groton. Located on the State-owned portion of Tabletop Mountain, this area is not "old-growth" in the strict sense, but has been set aside to allow it to become a representative mature hardwood forest (beech, yellow birch, sugar maple, and hemlock). It contains occasional, scattered trees of large size and old age.

I enjoyed a hike here. I found some nice and notable trees--a Maple that had an 8 foot CBH and you could see how the canopy moved up over the years with this tree. At the top it opened up with a huge 'stag' crown, probably 70 feet up.

I found a paper birch, 6' CBH, but with buttressed roots and OG characteristics.

A yellow birch, 9' CBH, had the largest crown spread I have seen in this species, a magnicicent, spreading, growing second growth, but old enough for the large bole and to have the aged bark characteristic of mature specimens of this tree.

No record holders here, that I saw, but there is 127 acres and I just got a taste of it. Abudndant Coarse Woody Debris.

Private land, friendly land owners, but it was a bush whack and then map and compass to find the natural area.
by adam.rosen
Wed Jun 22, 2016 12:19 pm
 
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Big Tree Trail, Lake Saint Catherine State Park

adam with large red Oak at Lake Saint Catherine.jpg [attachment=2]attachment]You would think that if a trail was called "Big Tree Trail" sooner or later I would check it out. Big Tree trail is a former pasture where a farmer allowed some second growth oak pasture trees to mature and get big. Red Oaks are close to the Northern end of their range in Vermont and they don't get big here like in other places. My hometown of Montpelier has NO oak trees. Too cold.

Lake Saint Catherine is in Southern Vermont and a valley to boot. It's warm there, so these are some of the bigger oak trees I have seen in Vermont. These pictures are more a family album than anything. Two oak pasture trees that probably date to the Civil War and really have had a chance to grow--one of them has a nice fungus at the base, the other a significant cavity. Take a close look at the bark and you can see it is getting mature characteristics.

The second growth pine is just for fun, maybe a hundred years old. But that's what we call a "Big Tree" around here.

One interesting feature of this park are the trees that are recovering from some severe storm in the past. Many trees had snaps at below canopy level, but had regenerated in interesting ways.
by adam.rosen
Thu Jul 07, 2016 1:34 pm
 
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Tinker Brook Natural Area

This is my fifth post about Vermont's protected natural areas. Some contain old growth, and others second growth (Lord's Hill, Gifford Woods, OG; Tabletop Mountain, Cambridge Pines--second growth). I'll keep trying to check them off the list--I'm still searching for Daniel's Notch--Vermont's largest OG area.

This is Tinker Gorge--25 acres too steep and remote to ever log. I have only a few pictures--me with a Black Spruce rumored to be 200 years of age, and one of the stream protected and filtered by the old growth. Tinker Gorge is full of Black Spruce, White Birch, Stripped Maple, and of course Sugar Maple and the ubiquitous Yellow Birch.

One can see how this steep bank is held together by a network of birch and hemlock roots. They hold the steep stream banks together--consequently, Tropical Storm Irene did almost no damage to Tinker Gorge--it takes many trees, and BIG ones, to hold off a storm. In one spot, you can literally see how a mature, straight yellow birch arrested a huge boulder and how this one tree prevented a minor landslide. The fantastic pools in the stream below are clear and free of debris, thanks to these old growth giants on either shore.

I don't think anybody is setting a height record here, but for the look and feel of OG forest, Tinker Gorge is one of the best. I don't know too much about the species Black Spruce, but there were several trees at what appeared to be a maximum height for the species in this location.
by adam.rosen
Thu Jul 07, 2016 1:44 pm
 
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Green .Mount Cemetery Montpellier

IMG_20161118_112232059.jpg This cemetery was laid out in 1855. The memorial speech at its opening refers to "soon to be shaded paths." A history of Montpelier indicates that this hillside and this part of the Winooski valley contained pines like the in New Hampshire, and, had the revolution not occurred, they would have gone to the royal navy. By 1855, there was nothing but open land anywhere around Montpelier.

The second growth pines planted here are some of the larger pines I have seen. They would fit in with the large trees on a college campus or park in Pennsylvania, new York or Massachusetts. I have taken two CBH here, on is close to 14 feet.

It is a very beautiful cemetery. On a steep hill side overlooking the Winooski river, it has a view down the valley. 160 years of Montpelier gentry lay beneath creative and ornate monuments. The paths are lined with pine and maple. The maples are gnarled and getting hoary and interesting, the pines seem to keep on growing! There are a dozen or so lining the original cemetery lay out. The bark has developed that lizard like scaly look that only happens when pines get old.

These trees are 30 years older than the Vermont record holders in marsh billings. They are half as old as the towering old growth in 1680 Grove in Paul Smith's New York. It's fun learning about the extent of second growth forest.
by adam.rosen
Sun Nov 20, 2016 7:31 am
 
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