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Re: Oldest tree in Connecticut?

You know a tree is old when it outlasts the rock it is growing out of.
by Rand
Sat Dec 17, 2016 5:43 pm
 
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Re: Oldest Tree in Connecticut Followup

Didn't know this:

Trees start growing wood from the buds down, so a very harsh growing season may prevent the tree from adding wood cells all the way to the base of the trunk. Each place where growth stopped is where two or more rings become locally “wedged” into one ring.


I guess that explains why you don't see the bark crack and crack on bigger trees until later in the summer.
by Rand
Wed Oct 04, 2017 9:51 am
 
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Re: Oldest Tree in Connecticut Followup

Jack- I really enjoyed your article and congratulations on such a find. When we - some NTS members were in southwestern Colorado I came across a similar tree at Piedra River Archuleta Co., Colorado. The tree had great age and character as well. It would be cool to know how old it was. Larry
by Larry Tucei
Mon Oct 02, 2017 3:48 pm
 
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Re: Manufacturing of an increment borer

You have taken on a very challenging project. Years ago, I toyed with the idea of making a 30" borer to look at growth rings on a giant burr oak in Goll Woods Preserve (northwest Ohio), for a precipitation history study. The tree was already dead but still standing The Preserve has a strict "no disturbance" philosophy though I believe I could have gotten permission to bore the dead tree. Long story short - I gave up on the idea after considering the design difficulties including that the wood would be somewhat dry and very hard; and also my interests moved on. I was in Goll Woods this Spring, but my failing memory won't let me recall if that tree has fallen yet....

Unfortunately, I don't have any specific details on the design aspects of borers to offer, but I still would like to respond. I have a 14" long "Suunto" borer which has worked well for me. I believe it was made in Sweden. It has three screws which I have been told, but it is not necessarily obvious to me, allows for easier and more efficient engagement than a two screw design. I believe what you call spreader bars, are located between the threads, but the last thread is tapered to allow for easier extraction. I believe that 28"/30" bores are available commercially but are quite expensive, and the idea of a do it yourself project is always interesting and educational.

I'm sure you already know, but material selection would have to be critical for your project. Borers are subjected to very high stresses. A 30" long borer may also be somewhat vulnerable to a "torsional squirm buckling" action - perhaps not, but something to look at when calculating the required wall thickness.

Good Luck!
by DwainSchroeder
Tue Jan 02, 2018 2:04 pm
 
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