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Re: Theodore Roosevelt NP

Visited this area, both north and south units, this July. Besides the cottonwoods, the arborescent flora appears to consist of of green ash, Fraxinus pennsylvanica, and three junipers: Rocky Mountain, Common, and Horizontal. The latter two, of course, are debatably arborescent. In fact... attached photos are taken from the alpine zone in the south unit of the park (high atop Buck Hill, which is a bit under 3,000 feet elevation). One shows the general environment, one shows all three junipers growing within one square meter of soil; the Rocky Mountain is only a sapling but the others are sexually mature. The third shows a mature plant of J. horizontalis bearing cones, with on overall height of about 4 cm. This is the shortest mature individual of any conifer I have ever seen or heard reported, so I suppose you could call it a height record.
140701-63 Jun horizontalis and Potentilla fruticosa on Buck Hill, in ND's alpine zone.jpg
140701-68 Jun horizontalis.jpg
140701-71 Jun scopulorum, Jun communis and Jun horizontalis.jpg
by earlecj
Sun Aug 17, 2014 1:45 pm
 
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Re: Canada's 2nd Biggest Douglas-fir Tree Identified in Rece

Cool tree, definitely worth a visit. Maybe it will make it. The Red Creek tree has held up despite life in a clearcut, and a decent forest is regrowing around it to help protect it from windthrow. Ditto for the Nolan Creek tree. By the way, the quote about the Nolan Ck tree above is inaccurate in many ways... Olympic National Park became a national monument long before it became a national park (though it's true that the park was smaller than the monument, with some valleys opened up to logging); the debate about national park designation was hotly fought on home ground in Washington, not back in DC; the tree, like many forest interior OG cedars, bore rather limited live foliage even when its forest was cut; it now has a 30-yr-old forest stand surrounding it and seems to have survived the greatest challenges of life in a clearcut; in fact its greatest risk is from visitors, who trample roots and threaten the few remaining strips of live bark; like most cedars, it has always been at relatively low risk of windthrow. It is sad and somewhat bizarre to see these giant trees alone in clearcuts, and it is a great risk to them, but it is often a passing thing. Many giant trees have lived long enough to see several generations of forest come and go.
by earlecj
Mon Nov 17, 2014 11:18 am
 
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Re: Help with species ID

Yes, it's Cunninghamia, also called China fir (which is kind of a strange name, since China has a lot of firs, and this ain't one of them). A somewhat uncommon horticultural species, though they have been sold in Mexico in recent years as Christmas trees. Photos etc. at http://conifers.org/cu/Cunninghamia.php
by earlecj
Sun Dec 13, 2015 10:47 am
 
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