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Re: Carolina hemlock genetics study

Planning to meet Dr. Robert Jetton from NCSU at Ritchie Ledges on August 30, for sample collection for the genetics study. He also plans to collect seed in the Fall. I hope the provenance of this population will finally be determined.

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Sat Aug 24, 2013 11:33 pm
 
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Re: Lurking for months and finally joined :)

Hi Everyone,

I've been lurking on this board for awhile now and finally took the plunge and joined. I generally don't join discussion boards because I've found the discussion often devolves into childish name calling, but this appears to be a more mature group :)

Jason

Yeah, well, I think everyone of a certain age tried their hand at that at some point. In retrospect it was a whole lot less worthwhile than it seemed at the time:

XKCD-wrong.jpg
by Rand
Sun Mar 02, 2014 4:14 pm
 
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Re: Old Mans Cave does it best Narnia impression

While there I also measured a few trees that were last measured in late 2008, and much to my surprise they'd grown about twice what I'd expected:

The tallest tulip went from 9' 1" x 154' to 9' 4.5" x 157'

The tallest hemlock went from 149.8' to 153.5'

A well positioned tulip on a streamside bench downhill from the tall hemlock went from 145.7 to 150'

Some pictures of the tall hemlock:

hem-m3.JPG

hem-m1.JPG

A closeup of the top:

hem-top.jpg

Finally a fallen hemlock near cedar falls gave a ring count of ~320 @ ~ 20' in the air. The chain saw cut was pretty punky, making narrow rings difficult to distinguish in many places, so this may be a significant understatement.
by Rand
Sun Feb 16, 2014 11:35 pm
 
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Re: Old Mans Cave does its best Narnia impression

Distribution of eastern hemlock in Ohio from the web site of James Dyer:
Image

HWA in Ohio, reported as eradicated from the sites indicated in red
http://www.agri.ohio.gov/divs/plant/caps/docs/HWAOHHistoric.pdf

-AJ
by AndrewJoslin
Mon Feb 17, 2014 2:13 pm
 
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Re: A nice swamp white oak---

Matt-

Here is another pic of the swamp white oak:
swamp white oak trunk.jpg
by Steve Galehouse
Tue Nov 12, 2013 11:50 pm
 
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Hemlocks on the Rocks!

ENTS:

One of my favorite places on my timberland is a section with large rocks and lots of hemlocks growing on and between them. Here are some good examples:

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This next one is actually a red spruce:

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These next two pics are looking up at some of the nice hemlocks in this area:

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Finally, while I am at it here, this last pic is of me sitting next to another hemlock growing on a rock, but this is from another area of my timberland:

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--Gaines

..
by gnmcmartin
Mon Apr 19, 2010 2:27 pm
 
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Huge Cathedral Redwood / Fairy Ring

May have shared this tree before with a narrow frame. Did a test print at 20 x 30 of this image I tweaked yesterday as a potential to put on my photography site. One of the biggest Cathedral trees I'm aware of, at Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park.

BTW ... anyone know of other species that form substantial "fairy ring" clusters?
by mdvaden
Fri Sep 13, 2013 8:14 am
 
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Re: Sequioa National Park Photos

http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=69&t=5129

http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=69&t=5233

I've pasted the links here for you. Since you've seen the Sequoias you have the same understanding of the enormity of the Redwoods but there is definitely a dense, rainforest feel that is lush and beautiful. Anyhow welcome to NTS. Nice to have another member with CA experience.
by John Harvey
Tue Mar 04, 2014 10:27 am
 
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Re: Carolina hemlock genetics study

Jason-

I met up with Dr. Jetton and a grad student last summer; they collected samples of the Carolina hemlocks. I think it might be up to a year until we know the full information on the Carolina hemlocks at the site. Either way, a reproducing population of Carolina hemlock is something special.

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Sun Mar 02, 2014 11:37 pm
 
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Re: Carolina hemlock genetics study

Jason, NTS-

Attached is the most current information I have regarding the Carolina hemlocks, which I received last December.
Jetton et al. 2013, TPN 56(59-71).pdf


Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Tue Mar 04, 2014 1:39 pm
 
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Re: Field Report, my first trip to the redwoods w/photos...

Some of my favorite trees here, Ill post a few more later.
by John Harvey
Wed Apr 03, 2013 8:36 pm
 
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Re: Carolina hemlock genetics study

Jason-

Yes, that's the implication. At the very least the trees at Ritchie Ledges will likely be among the last of the species to be exposed to HWA due to their relative remoteness.

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Wed Mar 05, 2014 6:49 pm
 
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Re: Carolina hemlock genetics study

Steve,

That population is so infinitesimally small that it should be a no-brainer to treat the entire stand when HWA arrives. It could be done in less than a day for a very reasonable price if contracted. If someone paid my way I'd do it as a volunteer; insecticide included.

Hopefully it won't go the route of other stands- victims of apathy, misinformation, red tape and lack of funding. This population- if indeed a relic outlier- is so important to preserve for many reasons. There are no longer any viable excuses not to.

Will
by Will Blozan
Thu Mar 06, 2014 8:41 am
 
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Re: Spruce and Firs Native to Ohio?

Jason,
Where exactly do you live? I grew up in Cleveland Heights. We had a tall Norway spruce in front and one in back of our house. We had three either Scots or Austrian pines, two Colorado spruce, a redcedar, a hemlock and perhaps a Suwara cypress. The Norways were tall (maybe 90'+) by 1990, and the Colorados were likely 60'+. I remember tons of Norway spruce in the neighborhood. I was surprised to find out they weren't native. Spruce are certainly at home in Northeast Ohio. Welcome to the board.
Brian
by bbeduhn
Thu Mar 06, 2014 10:14 am
 
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Re: Carolina hemlock genetics study

Will-

I'm not sure if it's good or bad that these hemlocks are within a national park, as far as treating them if HWA arrives to the area. I've let my pesticide applicator license lapse, but would be glad to get re-certified to treat these trees. So far in northern Ohio HWA has been confined to production nurseries and ornamental plantings, and control has been successful.

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Thu Mar 06, 2014 12:27 pm
 
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Re: Saheda Pine Climb, Mohawk Trail State Forest, MA

Ed,

Thanks for helping to get this up... I posted it as a celebration of Saheda reaching 169' as well as the difficulty this tree has posed with regard to height measurement. This particular climb was for a volume modeling and tape drop. At the time Saheda was 695 cubic feet and 163.4 feet tall. All five tops where above 161' high.

Listen to the narrative and enjoy the scene high in the canopy of Mohawk Trail SF.

Will
by Will Blozan
Sun Sep 22, 2013 8:59 am
 
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Re: Lurking for months and finally joined :)

NTS, Jason-

I had the pleasure of meeting up with one of the newest members, Jason Baker, at Rocky River Reservation in Cleveland----we had a nice hike, talked about trees(and how to measure them) and many other subjects. It's nice to have another NTS member in NE Ohio; I'm looking forward to future expeditions with Jason.

Jason with a nice Freeman maple along the Rocky River: Jason & Freeman maple.jpg

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Sun Mar 09, 2014 7:24 pm
 
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Re: Recommendations for range finder with an inclinometer

I use the nikon 550 forestry and it works decently well, but the Nikon 440 is decisively better at penetrating clutter. Steve Galehouse, and I shot the same tree with both lasers, and he often came up with taller heights simply because the 440 could penetrate up to a yard deeper into the clutter of twigs at the top of a tree.

On the plus side, in reasonably open conditions it is very convenient that the 550 does all the math for you, and comes up with a total tree height in two clicks.
by Rand
Mon Mar 10, 2014 8:29 pm
 
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Re: Recommendations for range finder with an inclinometer

Jason,

I'm not real familiar with the Nikon Forestry models. My first setup was the Nikon 440 along with the Suunto PM-5/360PC. Even though now I have a Trupulse 200, I still routinely use the Nikon 440 for clutter penetration. I should probably pick up a second Nikon 440 since they're no longer being made.

Matt
by Matt Markworth
Mon Mar 10, 2014 8:17 pm
 
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Re: Recommendations for range finder with an inclinometer

Jason-

I would still recommend the 'cheap and cheerful' approach and get a used Nikon 440, which has a more precise cone of vision, and either a Brunton/Suunto clinometer or a clino app for the I-phone. The advantage of having a mechanical clino is that it can be mounted together in the laser in the same sight plane, reducing errors in dropping one instrument to refocus the other.

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Mon Mar 10, 2014 10:35 pm
 
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Re: 117 metre Coast Redwood

That would be about 384ft tall, almost 5 feet taller than the current champion. If Im not mistaken, hasnt Lidar almost ruled out the possibility of finding a taller tree than Hyperion?

More worrisome still, all the cool superlative names are getting used up. They'll have to move on to names that would baffle the average person. Like avendesora or something...
by Rand
Sat Jul 27, 2013 11:26 am
 
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Re: Interesting Article on Vapors from Conifer Forests

Jason-

This is a very interesting topic. I can attest to the forests of the North being more aromatic than in the temperate areas, but also each genus seems to have a distinct scent---pines, spruce, firs, arborvitae, tamarack, junipers, and hemlock are all distinguishable and different, and there are broadleaves with similar aromatic properties, especially Comptonia and Myrica.

Steve
by Steve Galehouse
Wed Mar 19, 2014 10:59 pm
 
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Re: Interesting Article on Vapors from Conifer Forests

It's fascinating how many different factors affect the levels and impacts of atmospheric greenhouse gases. I just hope there are enough negative feedback loops for some of my favorite northern species to hang on through the next century. Reading this news item last week did, however, inspire me to make one of those memebase graphics. Though I don't know if Taxus species emit the right VOCs, and the image doesn't even entirely fit my own take on the politics, I still like it because it's a pun. Even if most of the people who see it on facebook won't get it.
by Erik Danielsen
Wed Mar 19, 2014 10:10 pm
 
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Hello from Northern Ohio

I am not a big tree hunter per se, like many of you, but I have been enjoying reading some of your stories the last few days. Steve Galehouse told me about this site a number of years ago (I have known Steve for years), and I came, set up a username, and then forgot all about it. Well I finally made it back here, and thought I should say hello, and introduce myself. I did go out one day last year with Lisa Bowers, who is administrator of Ohio's Big Tree program for ODNR/Division of Forestry, and helped her measure trees here in north central Ohio, including the large American Chestnut that has been discussed here several times.

I am a pest specialist with the State of Ohio, and at times get to spend time hiking the forests of Ohio doing pest surveys. I get to see amazing trees all the time, but don't currently have any of the equipment to measure them. Hemlocks are a passion of mine, and after reading Steve's posts about the Carolina hemlocks here in Ohio, I am dying to see them. Steve, if you are reading this, I would love to talk to you about them.
by Fred Meyer
Thu Apr 03, 2014 8:43 pm
 
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Re: From Ontario

As far as I recall, the oldest hemlocks recorded in Cataloochee via coring is around 450 years. I and other NTS have cored hundreds in the valley. Stump counts to over 500 have been made by myself on trees felled for footbridges. I have no doubt there were multiple 500+ hemlocks in Cataloochee, perhaps even a 600 year tree. It probably would not be big though; the largest trees will seldom if ever be the oldest. In general, big trees get big from growing fast, not for a long time.

Will
by Will Blozan
Sun Apr 06, 2014 9:20 am
 
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