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Re: Tree Maximums - Genus of the Week: Acer (Maple)

I have a few from Minnesota.

Black Maple - Acer nigrum
Circumference: 135.02 inches
Height: 84 ft
Canopy: 103 ft average
Maximum Canopy: 118 ft
Location: Plymouth, MN
Notes: Not really even close to the National Record, but not bad for our state and for a tree not in the "official" range of the tree.
https://scontent-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/1602075_1432068860362384_2110292523_o.jpg

Sugar Maple - Acer saccharum
Circumference: 149 inches
Height: 72 ft
Canopy: 84 ft average
Maximum Canopy: 110 ft
Location: Maple Grove, MN
Notes: This is the biggest Sugar I have found as far as point totals. It should be co-champion for the state registry at some point. Unfortunately, as you can see in the picture, it lost its main limb sometime in the last decade or so. The limb on the ground is approximately 2 feet in diameter and when it was still up on the tree, it would have added at least 20 feet to the height and 25 feet to the canopy. The second picture shows likely the cause of its falling. The old tree just couldn't support the weight any longer with its trunk being hollow.
https://scontent-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/t1/1661621_1443770995858837_855571884_n.jpg
https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn2/t1/1779193_1443770952525508_1454071488_n.jpg

Sugar Maple - Acer saccharum
Circumference: 151 inches
Height: 58 ft
Canopy: 53 ft average
Maximum Canopy: 59 ft
Location: Maple Grove, MN
Notes: Smaller than the one above since it has lost almost all of its limbs. This tree's life is wrapping up. Still has a huge circumference though.

https://scontent-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/t1.0-9/10001358_1456263834609553_132562980_n.jpg

Sugar Maple - Acer saccharum
Circumference: 131 inches
Height: 71 ft
Canopy: 72 ft average
Max Canopy: 82 ft
Location: Maple Grove, MN
Notes: Might not be that impressive in the points or size, but still a nice sized tree. Very cool canopy. It has very plated, almost peeling look to its bark. It barely tapers to about 30 ft up the tree where it breaks into the canopy. Kinda looks like an upside down squid.
https://scontent-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/t1/1912258_1443770755858861_1653337414_n.jpg
by Climbatree813
Fri Jan 17, 2014 10:42 pm
 
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Re: Tree Maximums - Genus of the Week: Celtis (Hackberry)

I know I am late in posting... and that Common Hackberry was up for tree of the week last year, but I just found it so I may as well post. Very cool looking tree anyways.

Species (Scientific):Celtis occidentalis
Species (Common): Common Hackberry
Height (ft): 84 ft
CBH (ft): 9 ft
Maximum Spread (ft): 72 ft
Average Spread (ft): 70 ft
Volume (ft3): Incalculable (The tree is hollow - basically missing half of the tree. It would gain some girth if it had the other piece.)
Country: United State
State or Province: Minnesota
Property Owner: Three Rivers Park District
Date of Measurement: December 28th
Measurer(s): Riley Smith
Tree Name: Still working on that... =)
Habitat: Lowland ridge
Notes: Not the best picture, but it was -4 degrees out and the camera froze up. Cell phone was the backup!

https://scontent-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/t1/p160x160/994428_1425462381023032_253722787_n.jpg
by Climbatree813
Fri Jan 17, 2014 10:32 pm
 
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Re: Tree Maximums - Genus of the Week: Celtis (Hackberry)

I pretty much exclusively measure with a laser. Winter in Minnesota makes a laser a lot easier to use when the trees don't have foliage. Funny story of how I stumbled on this tree. I was exploring the park for big trees and had already found a huge peach-leaf willow. I made it down into the floodplain area and a saw a Great Horned Owl take off over my head. I turned to watch it and saw it land in a tree. "Hmm... What is that?" And the tree the owl landed in was the big Hackberry. I'll see what I can do about more pictures. In the meantime I can describe it. The base of the tree forms a "C" shape where the C is the wood that is left and there is a hollow opening to the outside that runs up a good part of the tree. The mini-picture I have is of the healthy side of the tree.
by Climbatree813
Sat Jan 18, 2014 12:14 pm
 
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Re: Tree Maximums - Genus of the Week: Celtis (Hackberry)

Here are the photos:

https://scontent-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/t31/1501066_1432128520356418_476880709_o.jpg

https://scontent-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/t31/1548088_1432130727022864_1117716867_o.jpg

https://scontent-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/t31/1596957_1432127697023167_2117993335_o.jpg
by Climbatree813
Sat Jan 18, 2014 6:07 pm
 
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Largest Tree In Minnesota

Went on a mini road trip with my friend two days ago to see the largest tree in Minnesota, at least it was when we last had a register. It is really a beautiful tree!

https://scontent-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc3/t1/996113_1433154903587113_50633566_n.jpg

https://scontent-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/t31/1617694_1433155000253770_605475407_o.jpg

https://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn2/t1/1488657_1433155026920434_130554281_n.jpg
by Climbatree813
Tue Jan 21, 2014 9:45 pm
 
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Re: Tree Maximums - Genus of the Week: Abies (fir)

Bad - ID on my part. Sorry to those who liked the post.
by Climbatree813
Sat Jan 25, 2014 11:49 am
 
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An Ash Forest

Earlier this week my Nikon 440 Prostaff rangefinder and 100 ft tape measure came in the mail so, after a week of being stuck inside, I got out today to test them. I went back to a woods that I had been before, but I did not have a rangefinder then. The area is almost impassible in the summer as it is a lowland with a large creek cutting back and forth. The winter provided the perfect opportunity. This woods was full of Green Ash, Eastern Cottonwood, Bigtooth Aspen, Bitternut Hickory, Shagbark Hickory, Butternut/Hackberry (still disputing which, the bark was in between), Hawthorn, Dogwood, and pretty much every species of willow in Minnesota. I am happy with what I measured, though I know I missed a lot. Nothing over 110 feet, but pretty good considering the species and the latitude.

Species/Circumference/Height/Canopy/Notes
Fraxinus pennsylvanica/182 inches/82 ft/82 ft/The purists on this site may not count this one as that big since it is a multi trunked tree
Fraxinus pennsylvanica/98 inches/87 ft/69 ft
Populus deltoides/140 inches/102 ft/58 ft/I stopped measuring cottonwood after this one since there were so many black ash
Fraxinus pennsylvanica/114 inches/82 ft/71 ft
Fraxinus pennsylvanica/110 inches/98 ft/41 ft
Fraxinus pennsylvanica/101 inches/102 ft/51 ft
Fraxinus pennsylvanica/98 inches/74 ft/48 ft
Fraxinus pennsylvanica/106 inches/95 ft/49 ft
Fraxinus pennsylvanica/119 inches/81 ft/62 ft
Quercus rubra/ 168 inches/75 ft/73 ft

Pictures to come
Fraxinus pennsylvanica/100 inches/77 ft/73 ft
by Climbatree813
Sun Feb 09, 2014 7:29 pm
 
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Re: An Ash Forest

Here are some pictures going back to October from this area. My original post includes all the measurements, but I posted measurements under each picture that corresponds with the picture. For the fun of it, I named all of the big trees I measured today after Norse Mythology, so the names are below the photos as well.


https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn2/t1/1900062_1439430849626185_758372209_n.jpg
Thor - I named this tree that since it showed a little lightning damage in a couple spots. 95 ft tall, 106 inch circumference, and an average canopy of 49 ft.

https://fbcdn-sphotos-b-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/t1/1621919_1439430892959514_492483826_n.jpg
Elli - The Norse goddess of old age. This old ash isn't in that great of shape. It is missing a significant amount of bark on the opposite side from this picture. I can not tell during the winter if it is still alive or not. 81 ft tall, 119 inches in circumference, and an average canopy of 62 ft.

https://scontent-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/t1/1800471_1439430946292842_1090310446_n.jpg
Víðarr - Norse god of the forest. This tree grows out over the creek. 82 ft tall, 114 inch circumference, and an average canopy of 71 ft. The broken arching branch is a separate tree.

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc3/t1/1533858_1432133757022561_1452106371_n.jpg
Magni - Norse god of strength. This is the double trunked tree that has a 182 inch circumference. Double trunked, but still a beautiful tree.

https://scontent-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/t1/1545132_1432133017022635_570684053_n.jpg
Höðr - Norse god of winter. This Red Oak measures 75 ft tall, 169 inches in circumference, and a 62 ft canopy.

https://scontent-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/t1/1375227_1386215108281093_281300574_n.jpg
This is an older picture. I did not name these in the Norse theme, but named these the brothers Grimm since they are three large ash growing together. This is the northern most of the three while the other two are hidden (the middle of the tree is barely visible on the right hand side.) The one shown measures 98 ft tall, 110 inches in circumference, and a 41 ft canopy.

Sorry, that was a lot of photos, but I enjoyed the hike. =)
by Climbatree813
Mon Feb 10, 2014 12:08 am
 
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Re: Tree Maximums - Genus of the Week: Acer (Maple)

Added some pictures and updated measurements on my earlier post above. A couple of my numbers were off earlier.
by Climbatree813
Sat Feb 22, 2014 8:56 pm
 
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Re: Tree Maximums - Genus of the Week: Acer (Maple)

That tree is located in an old hardwood forest squished between the highway and a lake. It seems unlikely that it was used for pasture (steep terrain) but it could have been. As for a fence line, the trees grow in no pattern whatsoever. No characteristic line of trees or rusty barbed wire. That particular tree is in a very dense area of large trees. In a 500x100 ft box I measured 11 Sugar Maples over 7 ft in circumference (including the tree you commented on) and 3 Basswood in that size range.

This is picture is from Bing Maps and shows the area where that tree is located. You can make out the tree that you commented on straight left of the road sign, just past the path, and down a little bit. The second tree from my post above (the largest sugar maple) grows just off the bottom right corner of this picture.
https://scontent-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/t31/1909261_1443873732515230_362115495_o.jpg
by Climbatree813
Sun Feb 23, 2014 1:43 am
 
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Re: Tree Maximums - Tree of the Week: Eastern White Pine

It's been dead for nearly 30 years, but I came upon this article awhile back after hearing about this tree for some time. It was the state record white pine in Wisconsin for many, many years. It also happens to grow in one of my favorite places on the planet. It didn't quite get to the height totals on this page, but it had a pretty significant girth. The tree before it in this book was a beautiful tree too. I never got to see either of them in person, unfortunately. From pages 71 and 72 of this book http://books.google.com/books?id=Mf3C9bTQwq8C&pg=PA72&lpg=PA72&dq=brule+river+record+white+pine&source=bl&ots=mWr8SFeudL&sig=ybyn8ePKGJMYle0_7o3ADuZIkO4&hl=en&sa=X&ei=myY1Uo28AZP8qQG8pYCgAw#v=onepage&q=brule%20river%20record%20white%20pine&f=false . The whole book is a cool read.
by Climbatree813
Mon Feb 24, 2014 12:28 am
 
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Re: Rogue Minnesota Forester

I suppose in some states foresters would not have much work to do (Colorado, North Dakota, really any of the square or rectangle states) but some have their work cut out for them (no pun intended.)
by Climbatree813
Thu Apr 24, 2014 9:23 am
 
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Wolsfeld Woods SNA

Visited Wolsfeld Woods SNA for the third time last weekend. In my opinion, this SNA is one of the most beautiful tracts of woods in the Twin Cities area and it comes with some really cool history that prevented the woods from getting cut ( http://wolsfeldwoods.org/history.htm .) It is one of those woods one can never really see everything. Every time I go back I see a new tree I hadn't seen before or a new wildflower bloom. The other part about this woods that makes it fun to explore is it is crisscrossed with little streams running to and from Wolsfeld lake as well as a number of swamps and marshes that provide breaks in the old big woods. I got some tree measuring in too (of course.) I haven't found any outlandishly large trees in the woods yet, but found some with some respectable numbers and a Sugar Maple that should be a co-state champ at some point.

I knew I was in for some fun the second trip to Wolsfeld when there was a 10 ft circumference Red Oak, four 9ft + Sugar Maples, and this at the entrance to the place "well if this is at the entrance what else is hidden back in there." This tree didn't seem particularly big, but it was only 11 points short of the state record: Circumference: 134 inches, Height: 81 ft, Can: 64 ft

https://scontent-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/t1.0-9/10155838_1455703064665630_4887625_n.jpg

Moved further on the trail and searched a serious portion of the park. Saw a lot of 10 ft plus circumference Red Oak and Sugar Maple, but I was out for state champ titles. Then I saw an old information sign that said "the state record Sugar Maple is in Section A." Well, well, well. I knew it was an old sign and I knew that for neither of the previous two Sugar Maple champs were in Wolsfeld, but I decided to make a search through "Area A."

Didn't find anything that big on that second trip. In Area A I found a pair of towering oaks (a Red Oak and a White Oak) but ran out of time for measurements. The only big Sugar Maple I found in Area A was a 131 inch circumference Maple that looks like it was pretty tall with a big canopy at one point, but as one can see in the picture below, that time has passed.

https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn2/t1.0-9/10157302_1455703081332295_984209900_n.jpg

I went back to Wolsfeld last weekend to see some of the wildflowers the park is well known for and to find some new big trees. Found some pretty decent Tamarack in one of the bogs and 5 or 6 more Sugar Maples in the mid 10 ft as well as 6 or 7 red and White Oak in that 9-13 ft circumference range including the tallest Red Oak of the day at 10 ft 10 inch circumference with a height of 97 ft (not too impressive south or east of here, but I don't see oak over 100 ft around here except on very rare occasions.)

Then at the end of the day I hiked back into Area A to a nice forehead slapping moment. There not 40 ft from the trail (how did I miss that again) was a good sized maple that should be co-champ with a maple I posted on the "Genus of the Week" forum. Circumference: 142 inches Height: 83 ft (could be more, I didn't get a really good number here so I kept it on the low side) and a canopy of 69 ft (all on one side of the tree.) Pictures Below

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/t1.0-9/10170826_1465280860374517_5523850542304637411_n.jpg
The Maple that should be co-champ at some point. Really interesting marks on the bark. The tree is hollow.

https://fbcdn-sphotos-b-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn2/t1.0-9/10320369_1465282193707717_8425250965767070122_n.jpg
Another picture of the future co-champ. It is the curved one in the middle.

https://scontent-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc1/t1.0-9/1969407_1465280483707888_5714018103271261402_n.jpg
Twin Tamarack Marsh

https://scontent-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/t1.0-9/10322642_1465280710374532_6387465819074028442_n.jpg
This Sugar Maple obviously broke, but it had some very interesting looking bark. It was very pale and almost glowed in its part of the woods.
by Climbatree813
Mon Apr 28, 2014 6:07 pm
 
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The Missing Piece

Clifton E French Regional Park is a cool park that I grew up in. For years I thought I knew every inch of the place. A couple years ago I realized there was a small sliver of woods, hidden in a remote corner of the park, with no main trails into it, that I had somehow never explored that well. Today I did, and I was pretty happy with the results. I will have to go back to measure the Sugar Maples better. I managed to run out of time because I spent most of my time in other places of the park today. This particular area of woods had Eastern Cottonwood, Hackberry, Sugar Maple, Red Maple, Basswood, and Red Oak.

Eastern Cottonwood (The Wizard) Circumference: 262 inches Height: 108 ft Canopy: 108.5 ft
Eastern Cottonwood Circumference: 156 inches Height: 112 ft tall, Canopy: 98 ft
Hackberry: Circumference: 92 inches Height: 87 ft tall, Canopy: 53 ft
Hackberry: 91 inches Height: 90 ft Canopy: 52 ft
Sugar Maple: Height: 99 ft
Sugar Maple: 93 ft

As I said, I ran out of time today, but I think I measured the largest. There were at least a dozen Cottonwoods over 100 ft and I know there are at least a few Sugar Maples over 100 ft, but the largest I measured was just under. There was also a double trunked Hackberry in the 12 ft circumference range, which I did not measure because of the double trunk. The two Hackberry I did measure were growing about 40 ft apart and they were almost identical in size. Pictures below:

https://scontent-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/t1.0-9/10274332_1468691826700087_2685143747371923775_n.jpg
This is the biggest of the Cottonwoods (The Wizard). This picture doesn't do too much for perspective, but the tall tree right of the Cottonwood is a Sugar Maple that I did not get measured.

https://scontent-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/t1.0-9/10247447_1468691890033414_7378108722956904967_n.jpg
https://scontent-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc3/t1.0-9/10294385_1468691930033410_7932624325061778818_n.jpg
The first Hackberry

https://fbcdn-sphotos-b-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc3/t1.0-9/10155697_1468691953366741_4672670774819689797_n.jpg
https://scontent-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc3/t1.0-9/10325795_1468691990033404_8617422969021011450_n.jpg
The second Hackberry

Again, sorry the pictures are so dark.
by Climbatree813
Sat May 03, 2014 10:56 pm
 
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Re: Holyoke Silver Maple

As they said, Silver Maple, 4ft diameter is 48 inches. Divide that by 2 is 24 inches. Civil war has been 150 years. That makes approximately .16 inch of growth per year which would be exceptionally slow for almost any species nonetheless a Silver Maple. However, if somehow this was right that would be incredible, but, as the others have said, a lot of doubts in play here.
by Climbatree813
Wed May 07, 2014 10:24 pm
 
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Re: Tree Maximums - Tree of the Week: Red Pine

I have been wanting to visit the Lost 40 for some time now. From what I hear it is one of the most beautiful pine stands in our state as well as holding some of the largest pines in Minnesota. After the big red pine in Itasca State Park came down ( http://www.minnpost.com/politics-policy/2008/03/minnesotas-tallest-red-pine-old-dying-majestic ) it was replaced as state champ by one of the red pine in the Lost 40. There are some spectacular red pine in the Boundary Waters as well despite the fires and windstorms that have taken their tole. I wish I had measurements from my trips up there but I don't. Maybe this summer....
by Climbatree813
Sun May 18, 2014 10:57 pm
 
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The Quetico

I just returned from a week long 85 mile canoe/fishing trip in the Quetico. The trip was amazing, but, being the tree crazed person I am (=)) I couldn't help but notice some trees along the way. I was unable to measure heights as I didn't feel right risking electronics on a trip where tree hunting was not my goal, but I did have a tape measure so I was able to measure for circumference. The Quetico is a wilderness area that tries to be as human hands off as possible. The campsites are very minimal, the portages are left to as little human intrusion as possible, and only fires that were started by humans and/or are threatening life and property will be fought. There was a significant chunk that was burned in 1995 and, as a result, there were only a few sections with monstrous trees, but I appreciated that which there was.

The tree species I did not get specific measurements on were White Spruce, Black Spruce, Jack Pine, Paper Birch, Balsam Fir, Red Maple, and Aspen. For white spruce I know I saw numerous specimens well over 120 ft tall, of course I have no measurements for them (as stated earlier) but they were exceptional. Same thing with the Black Spruce and Jack Pine. I saw a fair number of them over 100 feet but had nothing to measure them with. As for Balsam Fir or Red Maple I could not pick out any exceptionally large specimen, but I do not doubt I passed some. The Birch were not particularly impressive, though a few caught my eye, none were that enormous. The Aspen, however, were huge. I don't see Aspen as tall or as large back home as I did in the Quetico (not surprisingly). I didn't get any good, solid measurements for height, again as I said earlier.

Red Pine: Red Pine is one of my favorite trees to just stare at. I love their scaly red bark and their often massive crowns. The best red pine I measured on the trip were in a portage around Silver Falls off of Cache Bay. The area is primarily Red Pine and there are a few massive individuals. I could only measure what was near the path (too many packs to get very far off) but I did get some. The best I had was 11 ft 11 circumference on a tree with a pretty serious taper near the bottom. There was also a large, hollow red pine at about 11 ft around close by. Many of the individuals were near 100 ft tall but I could not get actual heights.

White Pine: The White Pine is one of those iconic trees of the Quetico/ Boundary Waters area. Their enormous crowns and soaring heights outdo all but the White Spruce for height and are unchallenged for girth in the North Woods. I know there are far larger individuals hidden deep in some of the forests, but I appreciated the large girth on some of the trees. One the most difficult portages for us was from from Cullen to Munro. Along that portage is a landmark white pine of 14ft 4 inches around. The tree is now even more of a landmark because of the fire of 1995. The fire tore through the area and killed many of the other trees around it but somehow the beast survived (with a serious fire scar I might add.) There is a patch of information on it in the Ranger Station on Saganaga Lake. The largest White Pine I was able to find for circumference was near Dead Man's portage across Saganagons Lake. It towers above its neighbors. I did go off the trail a ways for this tree, but it was worth it. I had it measured to 14 ft 11 circumference at 4.5 ft. Unfortunately I would estimate this tree has 1-2 years left to live, maybe a little more. The majority of the canopy is dead and the remaining vegetation is very sparse. It has dropped some sizable limbs lately and there is a giant weeping crack near the base running 10 ft up the tree. Who knows, it may stand for some time, but I don't think it will live too much longer. There were plenty of other remarkable pines, most of which were impressive for their crowns and heights (something I couldn't effectively measure) but a good many more were still in the 12-13 ft circumference range. I wish I could have measured every one, but that would have slowed an already busy trip immensely.

Eastern Larch, Tamarack: The size of the Tamaracks up there impressed me. Tamarack is by far one of my favorite species of tree (for many reasons.) The most impressive I saw on this trip were along the Wawiag River (same place as the largest Black Spruce.) There were three Tamarack along the route that really amazed me. All were in the 60-70 ft tall range from my estimations. The largest in circumference was 10 ft 2 in circumference at 4.5 ft. The Wawiag also provided another surprise. For about a 100 ft stretch the banks were dominated by Mountain Maple (in that area of Canada called the Moose Maple.) The size of some of the Maples were quite impressive. The largest were in the 30-40 ft tall range with the largest circumference being 4ft 4 in circumference. There may have been many more larger that that, but we were in a time crunch that day and bushwhacking through the bogs wasn't something my group would have given me too much time for.

Northern White Cedar: There were plenty of very large individuals on this trip. I wish I could have measured height because I walked past many an individual far taller than I have ever seen before. The largest circumference I had for a White Cedar was 9 ft 8 on the portage from Ross to Cullen.

I wish I had had time to do a more in depth search and really get some numbers, but as I said, it wasn't the main focus of our trip. I'll try to get some pictures up if I can.
by Climbatree813
Fri Jun 13, 2014 12:26 am
 
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Re: Tree Maximums - Tree of the Week: Eastern White Pine

Found this in Wausau, Wisconsin. It wasn't as big as one would think it should have been (only in that 13 ft CBH range, probably larger if it had bark) but man the age! Kinda made me sad in a way, but a cool piece to study. I couldn't count the rings that well because of the carved writing on this end and the paint made it difficult to count anyways, but the rings were incredibly close together. This was a really slow growing tree!

https://scontent-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpa1/v/t1.0-9/10347174_1505354666367136_9065919167081427093_n.jpg?oh=4dddb94e01022c8a54c4fb8373cf3ca1&oe=54184D83


Edited to add some background info. This tree was cut approximately 30 miles from where it now lays. The owners of the company that cut it were a lumberman in a lot of different states http://digicoll.library.wisc.edu/cgi/f/findaid/findaid-idx?c=wiarchives;view=reslist;subview=standard;didno=uw-whs-stpt00ag;focusrgn=bioghist;cc=wiarchives;byte=263167814
by Climbatree813
Sat Jun 28, 2014 3:33 pm
 
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A Little Urban Forestry

I wanted to go to an island that I had noticed on a map the other day. I do not think the area has been cut because of its location. Unfortunately I could not get to it because chest deep flood waters were covering the "land bridge". With an iphone along I was not willing to take the risk of a fall so I grudgingly sloshed back to the car. I had scouted out a woods yesterday in the middle of Plymouth, MN that had some nice sized Sugars that caught my eye. The woods proved itself to have some serious diversity and some very nice maples. It was very interesting to find the number of mature trees that I did in the location (Plymouth Creek Play fields and the woods across the street) in one section of woods maybe only a quarter of a mile long and maybe a tenth of a mile wide and another section only a few hundred feet long by 150 ft wide. It is heavily (in my opinion overly) maintained and, yet, the areas that are not cleared of brush have some of the densest sugar maple saplings for quantities that I have seen around lately. The area also holds some history since the primary section of woods is located behind Old Town Hall (build 1885 and used until the 1960s.) The woods is used primarily by Frisbee Golfers now. As for trees, I noticed when I got home my measurements were all Sugar Maples and Bur Oak, but the woods also had American Basswood, Eastern Cottonwood, Green Ash, Black Cherry, Pin Cherry, Hornbeam, White Oak, Bitternut Hickory, Quaking Aspen, Hackberry, and Butternut (which I was excited to find. I do not see Butternut around very often.) I only measured trees near or above 9 ft in circumference this time. There were probably 50 more Sugars in the 7-8 ft range. I did not measure for canopy or height (the height was near unmeasurable, and none of the trees were that impressive in the height department anyways.)


Species: Circumference in Inches at chest height

Acer saccharum: 131
Acer saccharum: 125
Acer saccharum: 125
Acer saccharum: 120
Acer saccharum: 119
Acer saccharum: 113
Acer saccharum: 110
Acer saccharum: 110
Acer saccharum: 104
Acer saccharum: 103
Acer saccharum (stump, measured 4 inches below 4.5 feet): 133

**Note** I saw two more Sugars that I believe to have been in the 9 foot range but I could not measure because of a nearby Merlin nest.


Quercus macrocarpa: 146 (I can't decide if it grew in the woods and then the woods was cut or if it was part of an edge of a farm field. It has a large canopy, but the nearby building is only 10-15 years old.)
Quercus macrocarpa: 128


https://scontent-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpa1/t1.0-9/10553600_1513425498893386_6085778026883169570_n.jpg
The 119 inch circumference Sugar Maple

https://scontent-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xaf1/v/t1.0-9/10557405_1513425515560051_2579609112419459219_n.jpg?oh=0cee164815698c9162829f0b2a1ad7c0&oe=54543BA0
The 110 inch circumference Sugar Maple (see what I mean by some areas being over maintained? =))

https://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpa1/t1.0-9/10511236_1513425555560047_8995806925045118959_n.jpg
The 128 inch Bur Oak

https://scontent-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xaf1/t1.0-9/10513399_1513425588893377_4162016792127934066_n.jpg
Lots of nice sized Maples, just very little brush thanks to the Frisbee Golf

https://fbcdn-sphotos-e-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpa1/t1.0-9/10470894_1513425618893374_6337352909725466270_n.jpg
The big Bur Oak
by Climbatree813
Sun Jul 13, 2014 8:33 pm
 
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Door to Door tree hunting?

Just curious. Have any of you had bad enough big tree envy that you knocked on someones door to ask for permission to measure a tree in their backyard? This is probably easier for the city or state forestry people who can say they are doing a survey, but nonetheless. How does one go about explaining to someone why they want to measure a tree in their backyard?

Just curious to hear anyone else's thoughts. Three times now I have seen a tree I really wanted to measure but couldn't think of the right things to say if I rang a doorbell.
by Climbatree813
Fri Aug 22, 2014 7:52 pm
 
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Re: IDing The patterns and colors of Old Growth on Google Ea

Some of the most beautiful pine forest in Minnesota is due to a similar mistake. Ancient forests spared because somebody made a mis-measurement.

http://www.wildlifeviewingareas.com/wv-app/ParkDetail.aspx?ParkID=542
by Climbatree813
Fri Mar 21, 2014 10:25 am
 
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Re: Trees without any data

Well I lost my data for the tallest of the three sumac, but that was not what they were significant for anyways. Measured heights with a pole and with clinometer/rangefinder methods.

Smooth Sumac
Circumference at 4.5 ft: 12 inches
Height: 25.25 ft
Average Canopy Diameter: 13 ft

https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc3/v/t1.0-9/p480x480/1476069_1423796484522955_1294236342_n.jpg?oh=770bce7557bd83cf7d9c66a4236563ab&oe=54793E95&__gda__=1417732485_8f2b087b7cf897cfdcdd62fbcb577d74

Smooth Sumac
Circumference at 4.5 ft: 23 inches
Height: 21.25 ft
Average Canopy: 7.27 ft

https://scontent-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpf1/v/t1.0-9/s720x720/10410663_1531751583727444_1207808714314493853_n.jpg?oh=7ac5dc0665e3e104451c22849a0a066f&oe=546543BA

I'll see when I am home again at some point if I can measure the tall sumac. I have a lot of impressive smooth sumac its just a matter of gathering in the data from the last number of years.

Red Osier Dogwood
Circumference at 4.5 ft: 11.5 inches
Height: 18 ft tall
Average Canopy: 9 ft

Unfortunately the Bog Birch numbers got lost when my old phone died. I'll see if I can remeasure at some point.

And the Tamarack Bog that I need to get back to (extends for hundreds of acres worth):
https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xap1/v/t1.0-9/s720x720/14929_1527633270805942_8380716482200097444_n.jpg?oh=d42e9535a86a07c7d03ca82108888d4a&oe=5472A373&__gda__=1416593334_c769251a43931c2aa894a0d1a8c35d6e
by Climbatree813
Wed Sep 03, 2014 9:57 pm
 
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Re: Trees without any data

Found a staghorn sumac today. The thing that impressed me so much on this individual was the canopy. This one is located in Stevens Point, Wi. The other two, both smooth sumac, are both in Medina, MN.

Staghorn Sumac
Circumference at 4.5 ft: 30 inches
Average Canopy: 31.5 ft
Maximum Canopy: 34 ft
Height (Measured with measuring pole): 26.5 ft

https://fbcdn-sphotos-e-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpa1/v/t1.0-9/10628356_1544497195786216_3191845238587810291_n.jpg?oh=d53a32e9bf28d90fdccf5410c35fb90b&oe=549449E9&__gda__=1420187267_7cd6a8657dd96065e3a6a548c1159de1

https://fbcdn-sphotos-c-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpa1/v/t1.0-9/10614325_1544497072452895_7172406683174994861_n.jpg?oh=826337624efa32292696db82349cf06f&oe=54A25567&__gda__=1419726093_80d09482878691096be600d65af63916

So, looking at this picture, every sumac leaf you see is this one tree. The canopy is enormous. I thought it was a grove of a bunch of sumac until I followed them down to the source where they all branch at about 4 ft 8 inches above the base.
by Climbatree813
Fri Sep 05, 2014 5:57 pm
 
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Re: giant forest grown trees logged by neighbor

I would have felt the same way. There is really not much that could be done. I can think of so few woods in my area that I could relate to this to think what it would feel like. I remember feeling the same way though when they started developing the area around my old High School. The area was farm land as far as the eye could see except for a beautiful 30 or so acre plot of woods with giant oak and basswood and the like. One by one developers came through and bought each of the farmers out and bulldozed all but a few unfortunate trees (most of which ended up dying due to the fact that their runoff raised the level of the pond a good 7 ft.) The thing that is even harder with yours is that the people who cut it had other options. They weren't doing it for money (like developers), they weren't doing it because it was the only house, and they weren't doing it to save the house ( I would understand their concern if their happened to be a big old Tulip over their house or something that looked like it would collapse, but why buy the house then and why cut every tree?) Every time I see someone cut a forest I have long envied I try so hard to think logically, but it is heartbreaking nonetheless. Good luck with whatever happens. Hopefully the previous owners never have to see it. Sorry this had to happen so near and dear to home. Gosh I hate when these things happen.
by Climbatree813
Wed Sep 03, 2014 8:23 pm
 
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The University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point

UWSP is well known for their natural resources program, but their campus has some substantial trees as well. There are large Silver and Sugar Maple, a few handsome elms, but the truly special tree is a very large Pin Oak. This Pin Oak has been well documented throughout the school's history. The name given to it was the Hill Oak. At one point it was an AF national record until somebody found an out of this world specimen that now holds the title. It still holds the state record. It was last measured (that I know of) in 2004. The 2002 numbers (the numbers I have access to) read that the tree was 92 ft tall with a circumference of 167. When they measured it in 2002, a biology professor theorized that the tree had sprouted in the 1850s (before the school.) That number may be correct but I would have guessed it was older than that because of how slowly Pin Oaks tend to grow (in my experience), but oh well. It has lost some height since 2002 (has lost some limbs and needed trimming since then.)

My Measurements have it at
Height: 79 ft tall
Average Canopy: 72.5
Maximum Canopy: 76 ft
Circumference: 181 inches

https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xap1/v/t1.0-9/10421317_1552355398333729_5047190776264224989_n.jpg?oh=195b95901c6fcc6ceff811f3e5d36977&oe=54864EC0&__gda__=1419301369_cfc42ce92a71fbbf2d8102b943145b17

https://fbcdn-sphotos-b-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xfp1/v/t1.0-9/10620735_1552355481667054_7401955368871219214_n.jpg?oh=2889e962c109cee38ce95373760f1a99&oe=54970D0C&__gda__=1419040860_4cac17ee29c75749b842b25cb57e8723
This is the most recent cut, removing a substantial limb from one side of the tree (also one of the largest limbs that was hanging over the road, likely why it needed trimming.)
by Climbatree813
Mon Sep 15, 2014 3:44 pm
 
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