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Re: Impressive Bur Oaks (OH)

Landon,

Very cool! When the leaves are done falling around here we should measure that Bur Oak and check out Embshoff Woods, I've never been there before.

- Matt
by Matt Markworth
Sat Oct 26, 2013 9:19 am
 
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Re: Carolina Hemlock - Tallulah Falls Gorge

Landon,

Compared to it's botanical cousin eastern hemlock, Carolina is diminutive. Those in GA are really small but a State Champion regardless. The NTS has documented Carolina hemlock to 114' tall and 42" diameter (not same tree)- so they get much larger. However, a 100' tree is not too common as they do not often grow in an environment conducive to tall growth.

Check out this beast I found not too long ago...

http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=106&t=5311

Will
by Will Blozan
Sat Oct 26, 2013 10:04 am
 
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Re: Carolina Hemlock - Tallulah Falls Gorge

Landon,

The Tallulah Gorge trees are the only Carolina hemlock population in Georgia, and there aren't many trees even in that population. Georgia seems to simply offer only marginal habitat for the species.

Jess
by Jess Riddle
Sat Oct 26, 2013 6:45 pm
 
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Re: Impressive Bur Oaks (OH)

Yeti wrote:I ran over to Embshoff and snapped a couple bur oak pics


Gnarly! I've got my eye on a couple others around here that will require some door knocking.

- Matt
by Matt Markworth
Sun Oct 27, 2013 8:28 pm
 
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Re: American Sycamore, 3rd Largest known tree in Ohio.

Landon,

I stopped by there a couple weeks ago after you mentioned it to me. It's definitely still standing.

Speaking of Osage Orange, if you haven't seen it there is an absolute monster (18.57' girth) at Miami University.

Matt
by Matt Markworth
Wed Oct 30, 2013 9:46 pm
 
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Re: State Champion Tulip, KY's tallest

Landon,

This was an epic event. We congratulate you. Your confirmation also put another point on the map for the geographical range of 170-foot tulips. We have them in South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, North Carolina, West Virginia, and Ohio. We might have one in VA. We have two that are very close. We then have 160-footers in PA and DE. I expect there is at least one in NJ. Basically, we can see the drop in maximum height as we move northward. In CT and NY, we're down into the 150s. Going westward, I think we can find 150s in IN and IL. MI probably has a few 150s. We are getting a handle on the height curve for the species. I'm curious about AL. There are 150s there. I don't know about 160s. Probably not, and the max seems to drop off fairly significantly in MS.

Bob
by dbhguru
Thu Oct 31, 2013 10:35 pm
 
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Gold fall foliage

NTS:

While most people concentrate on red fall colors, here are two images of fall gold.
First, very metallic-looking gold on leaves of the native shrub Diervilla lonicera (Bush honeysuckle). An unusual sequence of weather, very warm followed by colder than average, has led to this metallic look, which is more pronounced this year than usual.
Diervilla-10-23-2013.jpg

Second, tamarack in late fall. Sigurd Olson wrote an essay entitled 'Smoky Gold' in his 1956 book, The Singing Wilderness, in which he described the last fall color retained in the boreal forest--the smoky gold of tamarack. Here is such a tamarack from my recent visit to northern MN to speak at the National Extension Climate Science Initiative Conference, in Cloquet MN. Its a somber scene of muted colors and gray skies that occurs each year in early November as the boreal forest awaits the arrival of snow.
Larch-10-30-2013.jpg
by Lee Frelich
Sat Nov 02, 2013 10:35 am
 
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Last Days of a Noble Bur Oak, Delaware, OH

Blundered into this massive Burr Oak at the Front of Gallant Woods Metropark located NE of Delaware Ohio. Perhaps the largest I've personally seen. Not sure what is killing it. Typically large isolated trees die from lightening strikes here in Ohio, but there doesn't appear to be a recent lightening score going down the trunk. Ssome care is being taken (pruning off dead limbs, guard rail around the trunk) but it appears to be in vain. The old tree has died back to a few big limbs:

BT-1.jpg

BT-2.jpg

BT-3.jpg

BT-4.jpg

I had my laser, but not my diameter tape. The highest dead limb is ~78' tall and the cbh is perhaps ~16'-18'. The bole is pretty strongly ovoid, and the picture axis is the largest direction.
by Rand
Sun May 23, 2010 8:46 pm
 
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Blue Church, Prescott, On Sept. 19, 2013

NTS:

On this warm sunny day Jack Howard and I visited this beautiful site near the St. Lawrence River just west of Prescott, Ontario on our way back to North Syracuse for our trip to Quebec. This site is an open collection of large White Pines (in an area that does not have many White Pines) in a 200-year-old cemetery surrounding the small Blue Church, which was built about 1845. It is comparable to a similar (but denser) collection of big rather old White Pines in Greenwood Cemetery in Morristown, NY, which is just across the St. Lawrence River. The White Pines near the Blue Church seem to be about 150-200 years old. I measured the largest trees with the NTS method, using laser rangefinder, clinometer, scientific calculator (sine method – multiplying distance by sine of angle – heights are in feet. I got heights on the following trees:

One of 2 White Pines west of Blue Church, with old, platy bark, 49” dbh:
Height 103.71

White Pine just to north of above tree, 37” dbh:
Height 104 tallest tree I have measured in Ontario (there are many taller ones, but this is the tallest I have measured)

These White Pines are quite picturesque, and one of the most picturesque is a battered White Pine 48.6” dbh that used to have 2 trunks, with one trunk broken. I counted 115 rings on a 5” radius cross-section of a broken branch from that trunk. The following is the height of the surviving part of this White Pine:
Height 88.5
IMG_00000719medium.jpg
IMG_00000731medium.jpg
Tom Howard
by tomhoward
Sun Nov 03, 2013 2:57 pm
 
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Tree Maximums - Genus of the Week: Gleditsia (Locust)

Hi All,

Genus of the Week: Gleditsia

Please check your spreadsheets and see if you have a monster Gleditsia lurking in there. Also, when you have a little bit of time, try to compare your own personal spreadsheet to the Tree Maximums List and see if there are some trees lurking that are just waiting to be recognized. So far we've made it through the genera alphabetically A - G.

Here Thoreau uses the alternate name of “three-thorned acacia” for Honeylocust. I still notice them changing to yellow very early in the season, along with Hackberry and Walnut.

"Now, methinks, the autumnal tints are brightest in our streets and in the woods generally. In the streets, the young sugar maples make the most show. The street is never more splendid. As I look up the street from the Mill-Dam, they look like painted screens standing before the houses to celebrate a gala-day. One half of each tree glows with a delicate scarlet. But only one of the large maples on the Common is yet on fire. The butternuts on the street are with, or a little later than, the walnuts. The three-thorned acacias have turned (one half) a peculiarly clear bright and delicate yellow, peculiar also for the smallness of the leaf." - Henry David Thoreau, 10/6/1858

Excerpt from Jess's Maxlist:

gleditsia.PNG

Excerpt from Colby Rucker's February 2004 list:

honeylocust.PNG

Please reply with these measurement details if you think you've measured a specimen displaying the growth potential (Height, Girth, Spread, or Volume) of the species. Please include photos when possible.

Species (Scientific):
Species (Common):
Height (ft):
CBH (ft):
Maximum Spread (ft):
Average Spread (ft):
Volume (ft3):
Site Name:
Subsite Name:
Country:
State or Province:
Property Owner:
Date of Measurement:
Measurer(s):
Method of Height Measurement:
Tree Name:
Habitat:
Notes:

Tree of the Week Guidelines: http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=393&t=5221

Tree of the Week Forum: http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewforum.php?f=393

USDA Plants Database: http://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=GLEDI

Don Leopold video . . .

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Qg3vNlQ8Zw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Qg3vNlQ8Zw

- Matt Markworth
by Matt Markworth
Mon Oct 21, 2013 6:22 pm
 
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Drayton Hall, Charleston, SC

While on vacation in Charleston, I continued my pursuit of plantation gardens. Drayton Hall is the only plantation house that has not been restored. An enormous live oak greeted me on the way to the parking lot.

Carya ovata var. australis 84.8'

Pinus taeda loblolly 118.5'
110.7' 8'3" cir
107.4'

Pinus echinata shortleaf pine 83.3' 7'1" cir

Quercus shumardii shumard oak 114.2'

Taxodium distichum baldcypress 82.1'

Juniperus virginiana redcedar 8'6" cir

Quercus virginiana live oak 20'5" cir
18'7" cir
18'7" cir double trunk
16'6" cir
59.7' 30'5.5" cir single or double? spread 129.6' x 108.6' avg 119.1'
hall.JPG live oak a.JPG live oak aaa.JPG big daddy1.JPG big daddy 2.JPG big daddy 3.JPG big daddy 4.JPG big daddy 5.JPG

Is it a double like it appears so obviously in the first three photos or is it a single like it appears in the last two photos?

Larry, I know you appreciate it either way.

There are seams that make it look like a double but the Angel Oak and Middleton Oak also have seams.
by bbeduhn
Thu Nov 07, 2013 5:37 pm
 
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Re: State Champion Tulip, KY's tallest

Landon,

Welcome to NTS. That tulip is a beast!!! Great report, great pictures, can't wait to hear what else you find. Congratulations.

Landon,

This was an epic event. We congratulate you. Your confirmation also put another point on the map for the geographical range of 170-foot tulips. We have them in South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, North Carolina, West Virginia, and Ohio. We might have one in VA. We have two that are very close. We then have 160-footers in PA and DE. I expect there is at least one in NJ. Basically, we can see the drop in maximum height as we move northward. In CT and NY, we're down into the 150s. Going westward, I think we can find 150s in IN and IL. MI probably has a few 150s. We are getting a handle on the height curve for the species. I'm curious about AL. There are 150s there. I don't know about 160s. Probably not, and the max seems to drop off fairly significantly in MS.

Bob

Bob,

Maryland has two 160' tulips. One in Belt woods and one I've not reported on yet.

George
by George Fieo
Wed Nov 13, 2013 10:33 pm
 
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Re: Does anyone recognize these trees?

Barry-They look like Siberian elms to me, Ulmus pumila.
by Steve Galehouse
Sun Nov 10, 2013 11:34 pm
 
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big tulip tree in Atlantic County, NJ

Since I live in Atlantic County, I figured I would show something from Atlantic County. As far as I can tell, this is the largest Tulip Tree in Atlantic County. It is 16' 10" CBH. It is at a Christmas tree farm just outside of Hammonton. Unfortunately there aren't any huge trees here, but there are some that are pretty big, none the less.
by tclikesbigtrees
Wed Dec 11, 2013 5:53 pm
 
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Redwood cutting has albino sprout

I took a cutting from a stump sprout growing on a redwood on private property a year ago. The mother tree was unremarkable except for a gigantic burl. The cutting rooted in 2 weeks and then grew rapdily for a year. I had to transplant it into larger and larger pots. The cutting's growth is spindley and its branches weep like a willow tree. A few weeks ago, I noticed a pure white sprout growing from the base of the cutting. The sprout is in direct sun, yet shows no signs of green or yellow. The sprout is growing very slowly compared to other parts of the tree.

Why would a non-albino cutting from a non-albino mother tree suddenly grow an albino stump sprout? I have included a picture of the albino sucker:
http://s29.postimg.org/6gjzn7w6v/image.jpg
by Luke
Sat Dec 21, 2013 11:04 pm
 
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Sielbeck Forest State Natural Area, IL

NTS,

Illinois does not come within 400 miles of the ocean, and eroded hills, mountains in miniature, cover most of the southern end of the state. However, the low ground in southern Illinois supports forests striking similar to southern bottomland hardwoods found in places like Congaree National Park, and supports such iconic southern species as bald cypress. Much of the flat area has been drained and converted to agriculture, but the Sielbeck family preserved a 125 acre block of forest for decades. The Nature Conservancy then purchased the tract at auction and transferred it to the state to create the Sielbeck Forest State Natural Area (Davis, 2003).

Only a few miles off the interstate, the site sounded like a convenient old-growth stand to stop at as I traveled cross country for the holidays, but I almost turned around before I got there. Each stream I crossed as I approached was over its banks from the recent storm, and flooded fields greeted me as I turned off the interstate. I found the site mostly shallowly inundated, but some areas adjacent to the uplands were merely squishy with abundant puddles. Consequently, I saw only a little of the site, and did not visit the wetter cypress-tupelo portion.

The forest sits in the middle of a crescent of 125’ high rounded hills that opens to the north and occupies most of the half mile wide valley bottom. The state has abandoned the agricultural lands that surround the forest to provide a buffer. Dense thickets of 20’ tall sweetgums with an occasional sycamore of swamp white oak now occupy the old fields. Sweetgum also forms the overstory with the help of cherrybark oaks and, in slightly wetter areas, pin oak. Green ash, swamp white oak, overcup oak, shagbark hickory, and sycamore grow much more widely scattered in the overstory. Green ash is also common in the well-developed midstory along with Carolina red maple, sugarberry, and a mixture of elms. Saplings of those midstory species combine with spicebush, paw paw, greenbrier, and a few possumhaw to create a surprisingly think understory.

SielbeckMeasurements.JPG
Three foot diameter trees are common except in swaths where storms hade broken up the overstory. The trees were probably taller before a severe ice storm hit the region in February 2009. All of the upper branches of the red oaks and sweetgum ended in roughly four inch diameter stubs surrounded by a dense bush of new growth. The white oaks on the other had appeared to suffer little damage from the ice.

IMG_4063.JPG
The dominance of early successional species and their evenness of size make me question whether the site is really old-growth or not. Some of the small streams that converge in the stand are ditched and have an artificial levee on one side. The sweetgums appear to regenerating, but I saw only one small oak.

I think this site could prove very valuable for helping to understand how species sizes vary across their ranges. Cherrybark oak, overcup oak, sweetgum, bald cypress, water tupelo, all, to varying degrees, approach their northern range margins in the area, and I explored only a fraction of the site.

Jess

Davis, M. B. (2003). Old Growth in the East: a survey. Appalachia-Science in the Public Interest. Mt. Vernon, KY.
by Jess Riddle
Thu Dec 26, 2013 10:13 pm
 
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Largest Eastern Cottonwood in NZ (and the world?)

Hi All,

A few years ago I made a quick note about the Frimley Poplar, the largest deciduous tree in New Zealand. I finally managed to spend some time in the area and managed to take a few photos of this impressive tree.

Measurements, as of 2011 ( http://register.notabletrees.org.nz/tree/view/210 ):

Height: 138 ft
dbh: 128 inches - actually diameter at head height (1.9 m/75 inches) to get above some basal flaring
circumference: 33.5 ft
spread: 111.5 ft
points: 568

The points total is 3 more than the US national champion P. deltoides var deltoides ( http://www.americanforests.org/bigtree/populus-deltoides-ssp-deltoides/ ), 38 more than the US national P. deltoides var. monilifera ( http://www.americanforests.org/bigtree/populus-deltoides-ssp-monilifera-3/ ) and 70 more points than the US national champion P. deltoides var. wizlesni ( http://www.americanforests.org/bigtree/populus-deltoides-ssp-wislizeni/ ). Not as many points as the US national chamption Fremont Cottonwood ( http://www.americanforests.org/bigtree/populus-fremontii-ssp-fremontii-3/ ), but that tree, and all the other US champions above are all multi-stem trees.

It is summer here at the moment, so the tree was in full leaf. It is past its prime, with a large hollow (and fire damage), but still a very impressive specimen.

One of the highlights of a (rather too short) summer vacation.

Cheers,
Matt

DSC03449_small.jpg

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DSC03446_small.jpg
by fooman
Wed Jan 01, 2014 4:00 am
 
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