Posted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 6:57 pm
by Lucas
Image


[googlevideo]https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipMP6wesHgnL_v_d-fjNofrw-oCb4Hah_G7wuO2Eoq34hpPcXZ94Y7PiV29l3XstYQ/photo/AF1QipNx9p4huWqXhqYP03bkpZlZjI525fC2YuEhccyi?key=dmc0QzhLUC10UTBRM1c1TEVfUVBaRXpRaWxyeFVn[/googlevideo]

Does google video work here?

https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipMP6wesHgnL_v_d-fjNofrw-oCb4Hah_G7wuO2Eoq34hpPcXZ94Y7PiV29l3XstYQ/photo/AF1QipNx9p4huWqXhqYP03bkpZlZjI525fC2YuEhccyi?key=dmc0QzhLUC10UTBRM1c1TEVfUVBaRXpRaWxyeFVn

Visible from the link anyway.

I was in the more than 125 years old local park, "including a dramatic steep-sided gorge, a winding river, cascading waterfalls, and a stately old-growth Eastern Hemlock forest", on the weekend. I rarely go there but while there I noticed that the trees were very high for here. It was hard to judge but I would guess 100 feet or more. Red spruce, hemlock, and some norway spruce were all tall.

I talked to some people from the Carolinas while there and they were super impressed with the trees. They said it was as good as what they had seen in the south. One guy knew what hemlock adelgid was so they knew more than most.

If more pix, or whatever, are of interest let me know.